S K Mathur

Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

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Publications (6)11.43 Total impact

  • S K Mathur, M A Mont, J W McCutchen
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    ABSTRACT: A consecutive group of 60 patients who had intraoperative custom press-fit total hip arthroplasties (67 hips; Identifit, Thackray, London, United Kingdom) was compared with a similar group of 60 patients who had standard press-fit arthroplasties (66 hips; McCutchen, Wright Medical Technologies, Arlington, Tennessee) to determine if there were differences in operative time and charges, as well as early complications and early radiographic results. The unilateral intraoperative custom group had an average anesthesia time of 3 hours, 39 minutes, an operating time of 2 hours and 26 minutes, and a blood loss of 725 mL. The averages for the standard group included an anesthesia time of 2 hours, 19 minutes, a surgical time of 1 hour, 25 minutes, and a blood loss of 480 mL. By 6 months after surgery, 49 (73%) in the custom group had subsidence of 2 mm or more, compared with 10 hips (15%) in the standard group. The custom group had 17 early postoperative complications versus 3 in the standard group. The charge for the hospital stay averaged $19,950 for the custom group and $14,322 for the standard group. At the present time, the high incidence of complications and the increased charges make the intraoperative custom hip replacement an unlikely first choice of recommendation.
    American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) 08/1996; 25(7):486-91.
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    ABSTRACT: The heaviest 45 patients (50 knees) who underwent cementless total knee arthroplasty were compared with a matched control group of 45 total knee arthroplasty patients (50 knees) with respect to clinical and radiographic data. Surgery was performed over a 10-year period (1980-1989) and follow-up evaluation averaged 7 years (range, 2-11 years). The control group consisted of nonobese patients matched to the obese group with respect to age, sex, diagnosis, preoperative deformity, and length of follow-up evaluation. Clinical evaluation was made using the Knee Society rating scale as well as an analysis of multiple other clinical parameters. Radiographically, each patient was evaluated with long-standing anteroposterior views, lateral and patellar views, and spot fluoroscopic views of the involved knee. This evaluation included an analysis of lucencies, bead shedding, and prosthetic alignment. The final average clinical score in the obese group was 88 points with four revisions, and that for the control group was 91 points with two revisions. There were no significant differences in the combined percentage of good and excellent results between the two groups. On the basis of the results of this study, it is believed that weight as a factor by itself should not compromise the early (7-year average follow-up period) results of total knee arthroplasty.
    The Journal of Arthroplasty 03/1996; 11(2):153-6. · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ciprofloxacin is a highly potent antibacterial agent that is used extensively in bone and joint infections. Because of reports of potential chondro-toxicity in animals, the effects of this drug on cells derived from human cartilage were tested in liquid micromass and agarose gel cultures. An inhibition of cell proliferation as indicated by a decrease in [3H]-thymidine uptake and bromodeoxyuridine labeling at ciprofloxacin concentrations of 0.5 and 50 mg/l was found which corresponded to the therapeutic and toxic serum levels. There was no effect on proteoglycan synthesis as indicated by 35SO4 incorporation. Immunocytochemistry showed no changes in morphology or staining patterns for type-I procollagen, type-II collagen, keratan sulfate and unsulfated chondroitin. Because the amount of inhibition of DNA synthesis varied with different ciprofloxacin concentrations, this data suggests that this agent has a differential effect on newly differentiating cells and might be the basis for contraindication in pediatric patients.
    Infection 02/1996; 24(2):151-5. · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The heaviest 45 patients (50 knees) who underwent cementless total knee arthroplasty were compared with a matched control group of 45 total knee arthroplasty patients (50 knees) with respect to clinical and radiographic data. Surgery was performed over a 10-year period (1980–1989) and follow-up evaluation averaged 7 years (range, 2–11 years). The control group consisted of nonobese patients matched to the obese group with respect to age, sex, diagnosis, preoperative deformity, and length of follow-up evaluation. Clinical evaluation was made using the Knee Society rating scale as well as an analysis of multiple other clinical parameters. Radiographically, each patient was evaluated with long-standing anteroposterior views, lateral and patellar views, and spot fluoroscopic views of the involved knee. This evaluation included an analysis of lucencies, bead shedding, and prosthetic alignment. The final average clinical score in the obese group was 88 points with four revisions, and that for the control group was 91 points with two revisions. There were no significant differences in the combined percentage of good and excellent results between the two groups. On the basis of the results of this study, it is believed that weight as a factor by itself should not compromise the early (7-year average follow-up period) results of total knee arthroplasty.
    Journal of Arthroplasty - J ARTHROPLASTY. 01/1996; 11(2):153-156.
  • Infection 01/1996; 24(2):151-155. · 2.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thirty elite tennis players were randomly assigned to three groups to evaluate shoulder isokinetic internal and external rotation training: an isokinetic concentric group, an isokinetic eccentric group, and a control group with no training. Subjects were tested before and after training both concentrically and eccentrically using an isokinetic dynamometer. Functional output before and after training was assessed by the average and peak velocity of six maximal serves. The effect of training on serve velocity endurance was also assessed. Statistically significant concentric and eccentric strength gains (11%) were obtained in both training groups when compared with controls (decreased total average strain of 2%) (P < 0.0004). Serve velocity increased by greater than 11% in both training groups, which was a significant increase from the average of 1% in the control group (P < 0.0001). In the endurance study, training group subjects displayed a tendency to maintain their serve velocity (loss of approximately 2%) greater than controls (loss of 6.4%) (P < 0.05). Isokinetic training led to increases in objective and functional output in elite tennis players. This training regimen may have significance in the final stages of the rehabilitation of injured shoulders as well as in improved performance and reduced injury risk.
    The American Journal of Sports Medicine 01/1994; 22(4):513-7. · 4.44 Impact Factor