S-M Ho

University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, United States

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Publications (2)13.32 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening has low specificity. Assessment of methylation status in body fluids may complement PSA screening if the test has high specificity. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of the sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer detection of glutathione-s-transferase-π (GSTP1) methylation in body fluids (plasma, serum, whole blood, urine, ejaculate, and prostatic secretions). We conducted a comprehensive literature search on Medline (Pubmed). We included studies if they met all four of the following criteria: (1) measurement of DNA methylation in body fluids; (2) a case-control or case-only design; (3) publication in an English journal; and (4) adult subjects. Reviewers conducted data extraction independently using a standardised protocol. Twenty-two studies were finally included in this paper. Primer sequences and methylation method in each study were summarised and evaluated using meta-analyses. This paper represents a unique cross-disciplinary approach to molecular epidemiology. The pooled specificity of GSTP1 promoter methylation measured in plasma, serum, and urine samples from negative-biopsy controls was 0.89 (95% CI, 0.80-0.95). Stratified analyses consistently showed a high specificity across different sample types and methylation methods (include both primer sequences and location). The pooled sensitivity was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.40-0.64). The pooled specificity of GSTP1 promoter methylation measures in plasma, serum, and urine was excellent and much higher than the specificity of PSA. The sensitivity of GSTP1 was modest, no higher than that of PSA. These results suggest that measurement of GSTP1 promoter methylation in plasma, serum, or urine samples may complement PSA screening for prostate cancer diagnosis.
    British Journal of Cancer 06/2011; 105(1):65-73. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: G-protein-coupled receptor-30 (GPR30) shows estrogen-binding affinity and mediates non-genomic signaling of estrogen to regulate cell growth. We here showed for the first time, in contrast to the reported promoting action of GPR30 on the growth of breast and ovarian cancer cells, that activation of GPR30 by the receptor-specific, non-estrogenic ligand G-1 inhibited the growth of androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vitro and PC-3 xenografts in vivo. However, G-1 elicited no growth or histological changes in the prostates of intact mice and did not inhibit growth in quiescent BPH-1, an immortalized benign prostatic epithelial cell line. Treatment of PC-3 cells with G-1 induced cell-cycle arrest at the G(2) phase and reduced the expression of G(2)-checkpoint regulators (cyclin-A2, cyclin-B1, cdc25c, and cdc2) and phosphorylation of their common transcriptional regulator NF-YA in PC-3 cells. With extensive use of siRNA-knockdown experiments and the MEK inhibitor PD98059 in this study, we dissected the mechanism underlying G-1-induced inhibition of PC-3 cell growth, which was mediated through GPR30, followed by sustained activation of Erk1/2 and a c-jun/c-fos-dependent upregulation of p21, resulting in the arrest of PC-3 growth at the G(2) phase. The discovery of this signaling pathway lays the foundation for future development of GPR30-based therapies for PCa.
    Cell death and differentiation 03/2010; 17(9):1511-23. · 8.24 Impact Factor