Solmaz Celebi

Uludag University, Boursa, Bursa, Turkey

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Publications (56)62.65 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. Coronary artery lesions (CAL) develop in 15% to 20% of untreated cases. Our objective was to evaluate demographic, clinical, and laboratory features and short-intermediate coronary artery outcomes of children with KD. Medical records of patients with KD were retrospectively identified. Clinical information and echocardiography, laboratory, and angiographic results were noted using a standardized form. The study included 44 patients with a mean age of the 29.72 ± 21 months (ranging from 1 month to 9.5 years). There were 28 male and 16 female patients; 20 patients were diagnosed as having had incomplete KD. Four cases with atypical presentation were significantly older than children with complete and incomplete KD; 17 patients (38.6 %) had coronary artery aneurysm (CAA), which declined to 6.8% after intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment. Time between fever and diagnosis and abnormal levels of hemoglobin and platelets were all associated with CAA. The children were followed up for a mean of 36.39 ± 19 months (with a maximum of 16 years). Angiographic evolution and regression of CALs have been observed in 14 (82.3%) patients. Three patients in whom CALs persisted did not receive IVIG therapy because of delayed diagnosis. Awareness of KD in children has led to an increase in the number of cases. Utility of IVIG treatment to reduce the coronary artery involvement in patients with delayed diagnoses should be discussed and considered. Long-term results are required to assess whether the KD represents a risk factor for coronary artery diseases seen during adulthood. © The Author(s) 2014.
    Clinical Pediatrics 12/2014; · 1.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Successful vaccination policies for protection from bacterial meningitis are dependent on determination of the etiology of bacterial meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained prospectively from children from 1 month to ≤ 18 years of age hospitalized with suspected meningitis, in order to determine the etiology of meningitis in Turkey. DNA evidence of Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), and Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 1452 CSF samples were evaluated and bacterial etiology was determined in 645 (44.4%) cases between 2005 and 2012; N. meningitidis was detected in 333 (51.6%), S. pneumoniae in 195 (30.2%), and Hib in 117 (18.1%) of the PCR positive samples. Of the 333 N. meningitidis positive samples 127 (38.1%) were identified as serogroup W-135, 87 (26.1%) serogroup B, 28 (8.4%) serogroup A and 3 (0.9%) serogroup Y; 88 (26.4%) were non-groupable. As vaccines against the most frequent bacterial isolates in this study are available and licensed, these results highlight the need for broad based protection against meningococcal disease in Turkey.
    Human Vaccines and Therapeutics 07/2014; · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Candidemia is the most frequent manifestation observed with invasive candidiasis. The aim of this study was to analyse the trends of candidemia in a large tertiary-care hospital to determine the overall incidence during January 1996-December 2012, as well as to determine the susceptibility of 453 isolates according to the revised Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints. Candidemia episodes in adult and paediatric patients were retrospectively analysed from the laboratory data of Uludağ University Healthcare and Research Hospital. The 17-year period studied was divided into three periods (1996-2001, 2002-2007 and 2008-2012) for better comparison, and candidemia incidence was determined by the ratio of total number of patients with candidemia per 1000 patients admitted to the hospital and per 10 000 patient days in these three periods. Redefined CLSI M27-A3 breakpoints were used for interpretation of antifungal susceptibility results. Candidemia incidence was determined as 2.2, 1.7 and 1.5 per 1000 admitted patients during 1996-2001, 2002-2007 and 2008-2012 respectively. A significantly decreased candidemia incidence was obtained in the third period. C. albicans (43.8%) was the most common candidemia agent, followed by C.parapsilosis (26.5%) in all three periods. According to the revised CLSI breakpoints, there was fluconazole resistance in C. albicans, C.parapsilosis, C.tropicalis and C.glabrata species (1.4%, 18.2%, 2.6% and 14.3% respectively). Almost all Candida species were found susceptible to voriconazole except one C.glabrata (7.1%) isolate. Candidemia is an important health problem. Local epidemiological data are determinative in the choice of appropriate antifungal treatment agents.
    Mycoses 06/2014; · 1.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains lead to severe infections in immunosupressive patients, geriatric population and premature infants. 27 MRSA strains isolated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit was considered as an outbreak and it was aimed to investigate the genetic and epidemiologic relation of the MRSA outbreak. MecA gene was investigated in the S. aureus strains and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to investigate the genetic relation between outbreak strains. MecA gene was showed in all isolates. PFGE revealed that there were two different strains and most of the isolates (25/27) were owing to same clone. One of the samples were found closely related with the common strain and the other sample was found genetically unrelated. To terminate the outbreak; liquid baby food was gained to the baby food kitchen, no more new patient was imported to the neonatal unit and none of the patients were exported from neonatal unit to other clinics during outbreak, education about infection control precautions was given to all the staff and nursing bottle dishwasher was obtained. To manage and terminate the outbreak, besides the infection control precautions, tests to determine the genetic relation between outbreak strains which are done in the microbiology laboratory are needed. Molecular analysis of outbreak strains will contribute to prove the epidemiologic and evolution of outbreaks.
    International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine 01/2014; 7(8):2209-13. · 1.42 Impact Factor
  • Çocuk Enfeksiyon Dergisi/Journal of Pediatric Infection. 12/2013; 7(4):147-156.
  • Çocuk Enfeksiyon Dergisi/Journal of Pediatric Infection. 09/2013; 7(3):125-127.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the causative agents in early-, late- and very late-onset sepsis in preterm infants. The demographic features, risk factors, clinical and laboratory findings in sepsis types were also defined. A total of 151 preterm infants with culture-proven neonatal sepsis were enrolled in this prospective study. The infants were classified into three groups with regard to the onset of sepsis: early onset sepsis (EOS), late onset sepsis (LOS) and very late onset sepsis (VLOS). A sepsis screen including whole blood count, blood smear, infection markers and cultures was performed before initiating antibiotic therapy. EOS, LOS and VLOS groups consisted of 23, 86 and 42 infants, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CONS) was the most common organism in all sepsis groups. The main factors associated with EOS included presence of premature rupture of membranes, antibiotic use in pregnancy and choriamnionitis. Previous antibiotic use was the main factor associated with LOS, while low birth weight was the main factor in infants with VLOS. Although mortality rate due to Gram negative bacteria and fungi was higher, CONS was an important cause of mortality in infants with LOS and VLOS. CONS was found to be the most common causative organism in three sepsis types in preterm neonates. Although mortality rate due to CONS was lower in EOS, it was an important cause of mortality in LOS and VLOS. CONS seems to be the main pathogen in neonatal sepsis in developing countries, as in those developed.
    Pediatrics International 09/2013; · 0.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common etiological cause of complicated pneumonia, including empyema. In this study, we investigated the serotypes of S. pneumoniae causing empyema in children. During 2010-2012, 156 children with a diagnosis of pneumonia complicated with empyema from 13 hospitals in seven geographic regions of Turkey were included in this study. Pleural fluid samples were collected by thoracentesis and tested for 14 serotypes/serogoups using a Bio-Plex multiplex antigen detection assay. Serotypes of S. pneumoniae were specified in 33 of 156 samples. The median age of the 33 patients was 6.17 ± 3.54 years (range, 0.6-15 years). All children were unvaccinated according to the vaccination reports. Eighteen of the children were male and 15 were female. The serotypes of the non-7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV) serotype-1, serotype-5 and serotype-3 were detected in eight (14.5%), seven (12.7%), and five (9.1%) of the samples, respectively. Serotypes 1 and 5 were co-detected in two samples. The remaining non-PCV-7 serotypes were 8 (n = 3), 18 (n = 1), 19A (n = 1), and 7F/A (n = 1). PCV-7 serotypes 6B, 9V, 14, 19F, and 23F were detected in nine (16.3%) of the samples. The potential serotype coverage of PCV-7, PCV-10, and PCV-13 were 16.3%, 45.4%, and 60%, respectively. Pediatric parapneumonic empyema continues to be an important health problem despite the introduction of conjugated pneumococcal vaccines. Active surveillance studies are needed to monitor the change in S. pneumoniae serotypes causing empyema in order to have a better selection of pneumococcal vaccines.
    Clinical and vaccine Immunology: CVI 05/2013; · 2.37 Impact Factor
  • Tuberculin Skin Test in Children. 03/2013; 12(1):43-46.
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    ABSTRACT: Catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CABSIs) are common complications encountered with cancer treatment. The aims of this study were to analyze the factors associated with recurrent infection and catheter removal in pediatric hematology-oncology patients. All cases of CABSIs in patients attending the Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology between January 2008 and December 2010 were reviewed. A total of 44 episodes of CABSIs, including multiple episodes involving the same catheter, were identified in 31 children with cancer. The overall CABSIs rate was 7.4 infections per 1000 central venous catheter (CVC) days. The most frequent organism isolated was coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS). The CVC was removed in nine (20.4%) episodes. We found that hypotension, persistent bacteremia, Candida infection, exit-side infection, neutropenia, and prolonged duration of neutropenia were the factors for catheter removal. There were 23 (52.2%) episodes of recurrence or reinfection. Mortality rate was found to be 9.6% in children with CABSIs. In this study, we found that CABSIs rate was 7.4 infections per 1000 catheter-days. CABSIs rates in our hematology-oncology patients are comparable to prior reports. Because CONS is the most common isolated microorganism in CABSIs, vancomycin can be considered part of the initial empirical regimen.
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 03/2013; · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of piperacillin-tazobactam (PIP/TAZO) plus amikacin (AMK) (PIP/TAZO+AMK) versus cefoperazone-sulbactam (CS) plus AMK (CS+AMK) for the treatment of febrile neutropenia (FN) in children with cancer. The study was designed prospectively and randomized in 0- to 18-year-old children with lymphoma or solid tumor who were hospitalized with FN diagnosis. Consecutively randomized patients received either PIP/TAZO 360 mg/kg/day in 4 doses plus AMK 15 mg/kg/day in 3 doses or CS 100 mg/kg/day in 3 doses plus AMK 15 mg/kg/day in 3 doses intravenously. Treatment modification was defined as any change in the initial empirical antibiotic therapy. A total of 116 FN episodes were managed in 46 patients (26 boys and 20 girls) with a median age of 6.5 years (range .8-17.0) during the study period. Success rates without modification of therapy were 47.5% and 52.6% in PIP/TAZO+AMK group and CS+AMK group, respectively (P >.05). No statistical difference was found between treatment groups in terms of durations of neutropenia, fever, and hospitalization. The overall success rate in all groups was 97.4%. No major side effect was observed in either group during the course of the study. Our study is the first to compare the effectiveness of PIP/TAZO+AMK and CS+AMK therapies. Both combinations were effective and safe as empirical therapy for febrile neutropenic patients.
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 01/2013; · 0.90 Impact Factor
  • Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences 01/2013; 43:617-624. · 0.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) is a rare syndrome characterized by predisposition to severe, sometimes lethal, disease caused by otherwise poorly virulent mycobacteria. We report here a boy with a recurrent mycobacterial infection from the age of five months. Immunological analyses revealed an inability to respond to IFN-γ, subsequent genetic analyses revealed a novel homozygous mutation, r.679G > A in the IFNGR2 gene, resulting in a G227R substitution, that caused IFN-γR2 deficiency. This is only the 8th mutation in IFN-γR2 known so far. The boy eventually died of hepatic coma due to liver failure at the age of five.
    The Journal of infection 08/2012; · 4.13 Impact Factor
  • Çocuk Enfeksiyon Dergisi/Journal of Pediatric Infection. 04/2012; 6(1):33-34.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the risk factors, demographic features, treatment and clinical outcome associated with candidemia in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) within an 8 year period. The data of infants who were diagnosed as having candidemia, were evaluated. Between January 2000 and December 2007, a total of 28 candidemia episodes were identified in 28 infants. A 1.1% candidemia incidence was documented in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The species most frequently causing candidemia were Candida parapsilosis (57.1%), followed by C. albicans (42.9%). The main predisposing factors for candidemia with C. parapsilosis included presence of maternal pre-eclampsia, prematurity, prolonged mechanical ventilation, prolonged total parenteral nutrition and presence of jaundice. Retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia were the most frequently seen underlying illnesses in infants with C. parapsilosis. In the present study, 13 infants (46.4%) had evidence of organ dissemination. The mortality rate was 42.8% in infants with candidemia. Mean leukocyte counts and mean C-reactive protein were significantly higher in neonates who died compared with those who survived. Candida parapsilosis (57.1%) was the leading causative organism, followed by C. albicans (42.9%) in infants. The rate of organ dissemination in the present cases was high. The mortality rate was 42.8% in infants with candidemia.
    Pediatrics International 02/2012; 54(3):341-9. · 0.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Varicella can cause complications that are potentially serious and require hospitalization. Our current understanding of the causes and incidence of varicella-related hospitalization in Turkey is limited and sufficiently accurate epidemiological and economical information is lacking. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual incidence of varicella-related hospitalizations, describe the complications, and estimate the annual mortality and cost of varicella in children. VARICOMP is a multi-center study that was performed to provide epidemiological and economic data on hospitalization for varicella in children between 0 and 15 years of age from October 2008 to September 2010 in Turkey. According to medical records from 27 health care centers in 14 cities (representing 49.3% of the childhood population in Turkey), 824 children (73% previously healthy) were hospitalized for varicella over the 2-year period. Most cases occurred in the spring and early summer months. Most cases were in children under 5 years of age, and 29.5% were in children under 1 year of age. The estimated incidence of varicella-related hospitalization was 5.29-6.89 per 100,000 in all children between 0-15 years of age in Turkey, 21.7 to 28 per 100,000 children under 1 year of age, 9.8-13.8 per 100,000 children under 5 years of age, 3.96-6.52 per 100,000 children between 5 and 10 years of age and 0.42 to 0.71 per 100,000 children between 10 and 15 years of age. Among the 824 children, 212 (25.7%) were hospitalized because of primary varicella infection. The most common complications in children were secondary bacterial infection (23%), neurological (19.1%), and respiratory (17.5%) complications. Secondary bacterial infections (p < 0.001) and neurological complications (p < 0.001) were significantly more common in previously healthy children, whereas hematological complications (p < 0.001) were more commonly observed in children with underlying conditions. The median length of the hospital stay was 6 days, and it was longer in children with underlying conditions (<0.001). The median cost of hospitalization per patient was $338 and was significantly higher in children with underlying conditions (p < 0.001). The estimated direct annual cost (not including the loss of parental work time and school absence) of varicella-related hospitalization in children under the age of 15 years in Turkey was $856,190 to $1,407,006. According to our estimates, 882 to 1,450 children are hospitalized for varicella each year, reflecting a population-wide occurrence of 466-768 varicella cases per 100,000 children. In conclusion, this study confirms that varicella-related hospitalizations are not uncommon in children, and two thirds of these children are otherwise healthy. The annual cost of hospitalization for varicella reflects only a small part of the overall cost of this disease, as only a very few cases require hospital admission. The incidence of this disease was higher in children <1 year of age, and there are no prevention strategies for these children other than population-wide vaccination. Universal vaccination is therefore the only realistic option for the prevention of severe complications and deaths. The surveillance of varicella-associated complications is essential for monitoring of the impact of varicella immunization.
    European Journal of Pediatrics 12/2011; 171(5):817-25. · 1.98 Impact Factor
  • Turk Pediatri Arsivi 12/2011; 46(4):302-307. · 0.06 Impact Factor
  • Mustafa Hacimustafaoglu, Solmaz Celebi
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    ABSTRACT: There are a variety of diseases, from local mucous membrane infections to invasive systemic infections, that are caused by Candida species. As a causative agent, Candida albicans is the most common; however, the other Candida species can also cause the same clinical syndromes. Most invasive fungal infections in children occur in the hospital setting. Candidemia is a serious condition associated with high morbidity and mortality and increased healthcare costs in pediatric patients. Children at the highest risk are those with prolonged intensive care unit stays, reduced immune function, recent surgery, prior bacterial infection, prior use of antibiotics and/or corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents, as well as use of a central venous catheter, total parenteral nutrition, mechanical ventilation and dialysis. Positive blood culture is the gold standard of candidemia; it should not be accepted as contamination or colonization in children with an intravascular catheter. However, in oropharyngeal or vulvovaginal candidiasis, culture of lesions is rarely indicated unless the disease is recalcitrant or recurrent. Recovery of Candida from the sputum should usually be considered as colonization and should not be treated with antifungal therapy. Antigen and antibody detecting tests are evaluated in invasive Candida infections; however, there are no published results in children, and their roles in diagnosis are also unclear. For the therapy of invasive Candida infections in non-neutropenic patients, fluconazole or an echinocandin is usually recommended. Alternatively, amphotericin B deoxycholate or lipid formulations of amphotericin B can also be used. The recommended therapy of Candida meningitis is amphotericin B combined with flucytosine. The combination therapy for Candida infections is usually not indicated. Prophylaxis in non-neonatal, immunocompetent children is not recommended.
    Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy 10/2011; 9(10):923-40. · 3.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In April 2009 a novel strain of human influenza A, identified as H1N1 virus, rapidly spread worldwide, and in early June 2009 the World Health Organization raised the pandemic alert level to phase 6. Herein we present the largest series of children who were hospitalized due to pandemic H1N1 infection in Turkey. We conducted a retrospective multicentre analysis of case records involving children hospitalized with influenza-like illness, in whom 2009 H1N1 influenza was diagnosed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay, at 17 different tertiary hospitals. A total of 821 children with 2009 pandemic H1N1 were hospitalized. The majority of admitted children (56.9%) were younger than 5 y of age. Three hundred and seventy-six children (45.8%) had 1 or more pre-existing conditions. Respiratory complications including wheezing, pneumonia, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and hypoxemia were seen in 272 (33.2%) children. Ninety of the patients (11.0%) were admitted or transferred to the paediatric intensive care units (PICU) and 52 (6.3%) received mechanical ventilation. Thirty-five children (4.3%) died. The mortality rate did not differ between age groups. Of the patients who died, 25.7% were healthy before the H1N1 virus infection. However, the death rate was significantly higher in patients with malignancy, chronic neurological disease, immunosuppressive therapy, at least 1 pre-existing condition, and respiratory complications. The most common causes of mortality were pneumonia and sepsis. In Turkey, 2009 H1N1 infection caused high mortality and PICU admission due to severe respiratory illness and complications, especially in children with an underlying condition.
    Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 08/2011; 43(11-12):923-9. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels and the frequency of MBL gene polymorphisms in infants with neonatal sepsis. Between January 2008 and January 2010, a total of 93 infants were included in this study and 53 of them had neonatal sepsis diagnosis as study group and 40 infants who had no sepsis according to clinical and laboratory findings as control group. Serum MBL levels were found to be low in 17 of 93 infants. Eleven of them were in the sepsis group and six of them were in the control group. Serum MBL levels were significantly lower in infants with sepsis compared with the control group. Frequencies of genotype AB and BB were also significantly higher in the study group compared with the control group. Most importantly, presence of B allele of MBL exon 1 gene was found to be associated with an increased risk for neonatal sepsis. Additionally, in the study group, the mean serum MBL levels were found to be significantly lower in the premature infants compared with the term infants. Pneumonia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) were significantly higher in infants with MBL deficiency compared with infants with normal MBL levels. Low MBL levels and presence of B allele of MBL exon 1 gene were found to be important risk factors for development of both neonatal sepsis and pneumonia, especially in premature infants. Low MBL levels and MBL gene polymorphisms might also be associated with inflammation-related neonatal morbidities such as BPD and IVH.
    Journal of perinatology: official journal of the California Perinatal Association 06/2011; 32(3):210-7. · 1.59 Impact Factor