S Alonso

Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France

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Publications (6)67.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The development of safe and potent mucosal adjuvants remains a major objective in vaccinology. The potential usefulness of filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA) of Bordetella pertussis as an adjuvant was assessed in a mouse model. The glutathione-S-transferase of Schistosoma mansoni (Sm28GST) was used for intranasal administration, while the gut-resistant keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) was administrated by the oral route. For both antigens, coadministration with FHA increased antigen-specific immunoglobulin titres. This adjuvant effect did not require chemical cross-linking or direct interaction between FHA and the antigen tested. FHA also behaved as an adjuvant by the subcutaneous route, indicating that its adjuvanticity is not restricted to binding to mucosal surfaces. The FHA-induced adjuvanticity was also observed in mice with high anti-FHA antibody titres as a result of antipertussis vaccination, indicating that pre-existing anti-FHA antibodies do not impair FHA adjuvanticity. No mRNA coding for proinflammatory cytokines was induced in the lungs after intranasal FHA administration. However, an increase in the levels of mRNAs coding for B7-1, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II was detected in the lungs after FHA administration. Although the molecular mechanisms of the FHA-induced adjuvanticity remain to be elucidated, the data presented here indicate that this adhesin, already assessed for human use as a pertussis vaccine constituent, represents a promising adjuvant to improve the humoral immune response when given by mucosal routes.
    Scandinavian Journal of Immunology 12/2003; 58(5):503-10. DOI:10.1046/j.1365-3083.2003.01336.x · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) are two major virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis. FHA is the main adhesin, whereas PT is a toxin with an A-B structure, in which the A protomer expresses ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and the B moiety is responsible for binding to the target cells. Here, we show redundancy of FHA and PT during infection. Whereas PT-deficient and FHA-deficient mutants colonized the mouse respiratory tract nearly as efficiently as did the isogenic parent strain, a mutant deficient for both factors colonized substantially less well. This was not due to redundant functions of PT and FHA as adhesins, since in vitro studies of epithelial cells and macrophages indicated that FHA, but not PT, acts as an adhesin. An FHA-deficient B. pertussis strain producing enzymatically inactive PT colonized as poorly as did the FHA-deficient, PT-deficient strain, indicating that the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of PT is required for redundancy with FHA. Only strains producing active PT induced a local transient release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), suggesting that the pharmacological effects of PT are the basis of the redundancy with FHA, through the release of TNF-alpha. This may lead to damage of the pulmonary epithelium, allowing the bacteria to colonize even in the absence of FHA.
    Infection and Immunity 11/2001; 69(10):6038-43. DOI:10.1128/IAI.69.10.6038-6043.2001 · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B infections are among the major causes of fulminant septicemia and meningitis, especially severe in young children, and no broad vaccine is available yet. Because of poor immunogenicity of the serogroup B capsule, many efforts are now devoted to the identification of protective protein antigens. Among those are PorA and, more recently, transferrin-binding protein B (TbpB). In this study, TbpB of N. meningitidis was genetically fused to the N-terminal domain of the Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and the fha-tbpB hybrid gene was expressed in B. pertussis either as a plasmid-borne gene or as a single copy inserted into the chromosome. The hybrid protein was efficiently secreted by the recombinant strains, despite its large size, and was recognized by both anti-FHA and anti-TbpB antibodies. A single intranasal administration of recombinant virulent or pertussis-toxin-deficient, attenuated B. pertussis to mice resulted in the production of antigen-specific systemic immunoglobulin G (IgG), as well as local IgG and IgA. The anti-TbpB serum antibodies were of the IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b isotypes and were found to express complement-mediated bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis. These observations indicate that recombinant B. pertussis may be a promising vector for the development of a mucosal vaccine against serogroup B meningococci.
    Infection and Immunity 10/2001; 69(9):5440-6. DOI:10.1128/IAI.69.9.5440-5446.2001 · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Live recombinant bacteria represent an attractive means to induce both mucosal and systemic immune responses against heterologous antigens. Several models have now been developed and shown to be highly efficient following intranasal immunization. In this review, we describe the two main classes of live recombinant bacteria: generally recognized as safe bacteria and attenuated strains derived from pathogenic bacteria. Among the latter, we have differentiated the bacteria, which do not usually colonize the respiratory tract from those that are especially adapted to respiratory tissues. The strategies of expression of the heterologous antigens, the invasiveness and the immunogenicity of the recombinant bacteria are discussed.
    Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews 10/2001; 51(1-3):55-69. DOI:10.1016/S0169-409X(01)00168-5 · 12.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tuberculosis remains the world's leading cause of death due to a single infectious agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with 3 million deaths and 10 million new cases per year. The infection initiates in the lungs and can then spread rapidly to other tissues. The availability of the entire M. tuberculosis genome sequence and advances in gene disruption technologies have led to the identification of several mycobacterial determinants involved in virulence. However, no virulence factor specifically involved in the extrapulmonary dissemination of M. tuberculosis has been identified to date. Here we show that the disruption of the M. tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) hbhA gene encoding the heparin-binding haemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) markedly affects mycobacterial interactions with epithelial cells, but not with macrophage-like cells. When nasally administered to mice, the mutant strains were severely impaired in spleen colonization, but not in lung colonization. Coating wild-type mycobacteria with anti-HBHA antibodies also impaired dissemination after intranasal infection. These results provide evidence that adhesins such as HBHA are required for extrapulmonary dissemination, and that interactions with non-phagocytic cells have an important role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. They also suggest that antibody responses to HBHA may add to immune protection against tuberculosis.
    Nature 08/2001; 412(6843):190-4. DOI:10.1038/35084083 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An in silico scan of the partially completed genome sequence of Bordetella pertussis and analyses of transcriptional fusions generated with a new integrational vector were used to identify new potential virulence genes. The genes encoding a putative siderophore receptor, adhesins, and an autotransporter protein appeared to be regulated in a manner similar to Bordetella virulence genes by the global virulence regulator BvgAS. In contrast, the gene encoding a putative intimin-like protein appeared to be repressed under conditions of virulence.
    Journal of Bacteriology 11/2000; 182(20):5902-5. DOI:10.1128/JB.182.20.5902-5905.2000 · 2.69 Impact Factor