R S Greenberg

Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, United States

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Publications (114)757.29 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This population-based case-control study examined the relationship between occupation, living or working on a farm, pesticide exposure, and the risk of multiple myeloma. The study included 573 persons newly diagnosed with myeloma and 2131 controls. Information was obtained on sociodemographic factors, occupational history, and history of living and working on a farm. Occupational and industrial titles were coded by standardized classification systems. A job-exposure matrix was developed for occupational pesticide exposure. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. Farmers and farm workers had odds ratios of 1.9 (95% CI 0.8-4.6) and 1.4 (95% CI 0.8-2.3), respectively. An odds ratio of 1.7 (95% CI 1.0-2.7) was observed for sheep farm residents or workers, whereas no increased risks were found for cattle, beef, pig, or chicken farm residents or workers. A modestly increased risk was observed for pesticides (OR 1.3, 95% CI 0.9-1.8). Significantly increased risks were found for pharmacists, dieticians and therapists (OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.7-22.5), service occupations (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.02-1.7), roofers (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.1-9.8), precision printing occupations (OR 10.1, 95% CI 1.03-99.8), heating equipment operators (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.4-15.8), and hand molders and casters (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.0-8.4). A modest increased risk of multiple myeloma is suggested for occupational pesticide exposure. The increased risk for sheep farm residents or workers indicates that certain animal viruses may be involved in myeloma risk.
    Scandinavian journal of work, environment & health 07/2004; 30(3):215-22. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The interpretation of the evidence linking exposure to secondhand smoke with lung cancer is constrained by the imprecision of risk estimates. The objective of the study was to obtain precise and valid estimates of the risk of lung cancer in never smokers following exposure to secondhand smoke, including adjustment for potential confounders and exposure misclassification. Pooled analysis of data from 2 previously reported large case-control studies was used. Subjects included 1263 never smoking lung cancer patients and 2740 population and hospital controls recruited during 1985-1994 from 5 metropolitan areas in the United States, 11 areas in Germany, Italy, Sweden, United Kingdom, France, Spain and Portugal. Odds ratios (ORs) of lung cancer were calculated for ever exposure and duration of exposure to secondhand smoke from spouse, workplace and social sources. The OR for ever exposure to spousal smoking was 1.18 (95% CI = 1.01-1.37) and for long-term exposure was 1.23 (95% CI = 1.01-1.51). After exclusion of proxy interviews, the OR for ever exposure from the workplace was 1.16 (95% CI = 0.99-1.36) and for long-term exposure was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.03-1.57). Similar results were obtained for exposure from social settings and for exposure from combined sources. A dose-response relationship was present with increasing duration of exposure to secondhand smoke for all 3 sources, with an OR of 1.32 (95% CI = 1.10-1.79) for the long-term exposure from all sources. There was no evidence of confounding by employment in high-risk occupations, education or low vegetable intake. Sensitivity analysis for the effects of misclassification (both positive and negative) indicated that the observed risks are likely to underestimate the true risk. Clear dose-response relationships consistent with a causal association were observed between exposure to secondhand smoke from spousal, workplace and social sources and the development of lung cancer among never smokers.
    International Journal of Cancer 04/2004; 109(1):125-31. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prostate cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men worldwide and the most common cancer in men in the United States, with reported incidence rates for U.S. blacks being the highest in the world. The etiology of prostate cancer and an explanation for the racial disparity in incidence in the United States remain elusive. Epidemiologic studies suggest that selenium, an essential trace element, may protect against the disease. To further explore this hypothesis, we measured serum selenium in 212 cases and 233 controls participating in a multicenter, population-based case-control study that included comparable numbers of U.S. black and white men aged 40-79 years. Serum selenium was inversely associated with risk of prostate cancer (comparing highest to lowest quartiles, OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.39-1.28; p for trend = 0.11), with similar patterns seen in both blacks and whites. Cubic regression spline analysis of continuous serum selenium indicated a reduced risk of prostate cancer above concentrations of 0.135 microg/ml (median among controls) compared to a reference value set at the median of the lowest selenium quartile. Because both the selenoenzyme GPX and vitamin E can function as antioxidants, we also explored their joint effect. Consistent with other studies, the inverse association with selenium was strongest among men with low serum alpha-tocopherol concentrations. In conclusion, our results suggest a moderately reduced risk of prostate cancer at higher serum selenium concentrations, a finding that can now be extended to include U.S. blacks. Since selenium exposure varies widely throughout the world, further research on optimal concentrations for cancer prevention is justified.
    International Journal of Cancer 03/2003; 103(5):664-70. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: For several decades, the incidence of pancreatic cancer has been 50% to 90% higher among blacks than among whites in the United States. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that may contribute to this racial disparity. We conducted a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer diagnosed in Atlanta (GA), Detroit (MI), and 10 New Jersey counties from August 1986 through April 1989. In-person interviews were exclusively with subjects (526 cases and 2153 population controls), rather than with next of kin. The determinants of the higher incidence of pancreatic cancer among blacks than among whites differed by sex. Among men, established risk factors (, cigarette smoking, long-term diabetes mellitus, family history of pancreatic cancer) account for 46% of the disease in blacks and 37% in whites, potentially explaining all but 6% of the excess risk among blacks. Among women, however, other factors appear to contribute to the racial disparity, notably moderate/heavy alcohol consumption (>7 drinks per week) and elevated body mass index (above the first quartile). When these less accepted risk factors were combined with the established risk factors, 88% of the disease in black women and 47% in white women were explained, potentially accounting for all of the excess risk among blacks in our female study population. Among men, the established risk factors (mainly cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus) explain almost the entire black/white disparity in incidence. Among women, however, other factors appear to contribute to the racial disparity, notably moderate/heavy alcohol consumption and elevated body mass index. In the absence of these factors, pancreatic cancer incidence rates among blacks probably would not exceed those among whites of either sex.
    Epidemiology 01/2003; 14(1):45-54. · 5.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiologic studies investigating the relation between individual carotenoids and risk of prostate cancer have produced inconsistent results. To further explore these associations and to search for reasons prostate cancer incidence is over 50% higher in US Blacks than Whites, the authors analyzed the serum levels of individual carotenoids in 209 cases and 228 controls in a US multicenter, population-based case-control study (1986-1989) that included comparable numbers of Black men and White men aged 40-79 years. Lycopene was inversely associated with prostate cancer risk (comparing highest with lowest quartiles, odds ratio (OR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36, 1.15; test for trend, p = 0.09), particularly for aggressive disease (comparing extreme quartiles, OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.94; test for trend, p = 0.04). Other carotenoids were positively associated with risk. For all carotenoids, patterns were similar for Blacks and Whites. However, in both the controls and the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, serum lycopene concentrations were significantly lower in Blacks than in Whites, raising the possibility that differences in lycopene exposure may contribute to the racial disparity in incidence. In conclusion, the results, though not statistically significant, suggest that serum lycopene is inversely related to prostate cancer risk in US Blacks and Whites.
    American Journal of Epidemiology 07/2002; 155(11):1023-32. · 4.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the relationship between cumulative lifetime exposure to diagnostic radiation and the risk of multiple myeloma using data from a large, multi-center, population-based case-control study. Study subjects included a total of 540 cases with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma and 1998 frequency-matched population controls living in three areas of the United States (Georgia, Michigan, New Jersey). Information on exposure to diagnostic X-rays was obtained by personal interview. No association was found between case-control status and the total number of reported diagnostic X-rays of any type (odds ratio (OR) for 20 or more compared to less than 5 X-rays = 0.9, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.7-1.2). There was no evidence of an excess risk of multiple myeloma among individuals who reported exposure to 10 or more diagnostic X-rays that impart a relatively high radiation dose to the bone marrow, as compared to individuals reporting no such exposures (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.4-1.3). These data suggest that exposure to diagnostic X-rays has a negligible impact, if any, on risk of developing multiple myeloma.
    Cancer Causes and Control 11/2001; 12(8):755-61. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Data from a population-based case-control study were used to evaluate the relation between social class factors and squamous cell esophageal cancer and the extent to which alcohol, tobacco, diet, and low income contribute to the higher incidence among Black men than among White men in the United States. A total of 347 male cases (119 White, 228 Black) and 1,354 male controls (743 White, 611 Black) were selected from three US geographic areas (Atlanta, Georgia, Detroit, Michigan, and New Jersey). Cases were residents of the study areas aged 30-79 years who had been diagnosed with histologically confirmed esophageal cancer between 1986 and 1989. The adjusted odds ratios for subjects with annual incomes less than $10,000 versus incomes of $25,000 or more were 4.3 (95% confidence interval: 2.1, 8.7) for Whites and 8.0 (95% confidence interval: 4.3, 15.0) for Blacks. The combination of all four major risk factors-low income, moderate/heavy alcohol intake, tobacco use, and infrequent consumption of raw fruits and vegetables-accounted for almost all of the squamous cell esophageal cancers in Whites (98%) and Blacks (99%) and for 99% of the excess incidence among Black men. Thus, lifestyle modifications, especially a lowered intake of alcoholic beverages, would markedly decrease the incidence of squamous cell esophageal cancer in both racial groups and would narrow the racial disparity in risk. Further studies on the determinants of social class may help to identify a new set of exposures for this tumor that are amenable to intervention.
    American Journal of Epidemiology 02/2001; 153(2):114-22. · 4.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An increased risk of exposure to pesticides for pancreatic cancer has been suggested in a number of epidemiologic studies. Cases (N = 484), aged 30-79 years, were diagnosed in 1986-1989. Controls (N = 2,095) were a random sample of the general population. Information on usual occupation and potential confounding factors was obtained. A job-exposure matrix (JEM) approach was used to estimate the level of occupational exposure to pesticides. A significant trend in risk with increasing exposure level of pesticides was observed, with ORs of 1.3 and 1.4 for low and moderate/high exposure levels, respectively. Excess risks were found for occupational exposure to fungicides (OR = 1.5) and herbicides (OR = 1.6) in the moderate/high level after adjustment for potential confounding factors. An increased risk for insecticide exposure was disappeared after adjustment for fungicide and herbicide exposures. Results of our occupation-based analysis were consistent with those from the JEM-based analysis. Our results suggest that pesticides may increase risk of pancreatic cancer, and indicate the need for investigations that can evaluate risk by specific chemical exposures. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Industrial Medicine 02/2001; 39(1):92-9. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To explore whether dietary factors contribute to the risk of multiple myeloma and the two-fold higher incidence among blacks compared to whites in the United States. Methods: Data from a food-frequency questionnaire were analyzed for 346 white and 193 black subjects with multiple myeloma, and 1086 white and 903 black controls who participated in a population-based case–control study of multiple myeloma in three areas of the United States. Results: Elevated risks were associated with obese vs. normal weight (OR = 1.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2–3.1 for whites and OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.9–2.4 for blacks), while the frequency of obesity was greater for black than white controls. Reduced risks were related to frequent intake of cruciferous vegetables (OR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.6–0.99) and fish (OR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.5–0.9) in both races combined, and to vitamin C supplements in whites (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.5–0.9) and blacks (OR = 0.8, 95% CI = 0.5–1.4), with the frequency of vitamin supplement use being greater for white than black controls. However, frequent intake of vitamin C from food and supplements combined was associated with a protective effect in whites (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4–0.9), but not blacks (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.8–2.1). Conclusions: The greater use of vitamin C supplements by whites and the higher frequency of obesity among blacks may explain part of the higher incidence of multiple myeloma among blacks compared to whites in the United States. In addition, the increasing prevalence of obesity may have contributed to the upward trend in the incidence of multiple myeloma during recent decades.
    Cancer Causes and Control 01/2001; 12(2):117-125. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Blacks are less likely than whites to develop bladder cancer; although once diagnosed, blacks experience poorer survival. This study sought to examine multiple biological and behavioral factors and their influence on extent of disease. A population-based cohort of black bladder cancer patients and a random sample of frequency-matched white bladder cancer patients, stratified by age, gender, and race were identified through cancer registry systems in metropolitan Atlanta, New Orleans, and the San Francisco/Oakland area. Patients were ages 20-79 years at bladder cancer diagnosis from 1985-1987, and had no previous cancer history. Medical records were reviewed at initial diagnosis. Of the patients selected for study, a total of 77% of patients was interviewed. Grade, stage, and other variables (including age, socioeconomic status, symptom duration, and smoking history) were recorded. Extent of disease was modeled in 497 patients with urothelial carcinoma using logistic regression. Extent of disease at diagnosis was significantly greater in Blacks than in Whites. Older age group, higher tumor grade, larger tumors, and presence of carcinoma in situ were related to greater extent of disease in blacks and in whites. Large disparities between blacks and whites were found for socioeconomic status and source of care. Blacks had greater symptom duration and higher grade. Black women were more likely to have invasive disease than white women; this difference was not seen among men. Blacks in unskilled occupational categories, perhaps reflecting socioeconomic factors, were at much higher risk for muscle invasion than whites. While specific relationships between variables were noted, an overall pattern defining black and white differences in stage did not emerge. Future studies should examine the basis upon which occupation and life style factors operate by using biochemical and molecular methods to study the genetic factors involved.
    Cancer 10/2000; 89(6):1349-58. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between social class factors and squamous cell esophageal cancer and the extent to which alcohol, tobacco, diet, and social class contribute to the five-fold higher incidence among black than white men in the United States.METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 347 incident cases of squamous cell esophageal cancer (119 white males and 228 black males) and 1354 population-based controls (743 white males and 611 black males) from Atlanta, Detroit, and New Jersey. Risks were estimated using unconditional logistic regression controlling for potential confounders.RESULTS: Elevated risks of squamous cell esophageal cancer were associated with indicators of low social class, especially low annual income. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for subjects with incomes < $10,000 versus incomes of $25,000 or more were 4.3 (95% CI = 2.1-8.7) for whites and 8.0 (95% CI = 4.3-15.0) for blacks. The combination of all four major risk factors: annual income less than $25,000, moderate/heavy use of alcohol, use of tobacco for six months or longer, and consumption of less than 2.5 servings of raw fruits and vegetables per day accounted for almost all of the squamous cell esophageal cancers in whites (98%) and blacks (99%), and for 99% of the excess incidence among black men.CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle modifications, especially a lower intake of alcoholic beverages, would markedly decrease the incidence of this cancer in both races and narrow the racial disparity in risk. Further studies into the determinants of social class may help identify a new set of exposures for this tumor that are amendable to intervention.
    Annals of epidemiology 10/2000; 10(7):468. · 2.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the relation between socioeconomic status (SES) and risk of multiple myeloma among Blacks and Whites in the United States. This population-based case-control study included 573 cases (206 Blacks and 367 Whites) with new diagnoses of multiple myeloma identified between August 1, 1986, and April 30, 1989, and 2131 controls (967 Blacks and 1164 Whites) from 3 US geographic areas. Information on occupation, income, and education was obtained by personal interview. Inverse gradients in risk were associated with occupation-based SES, income, and education. Risks were significantly elevated for subjects in the lowest categories of occupation-based SES (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16, 2.53), education (OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06, 1.75), and income (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.93). Occupation-based low SES accounted for 37% of multiple myeloma in Blacks and 17% in Whites, as well as 49% of the excess incidence in Blacks. Low education and low income accounted for 17% and 28% of the excess incidence in Blacks, respectively. Our results indicate that the measured SES-related factors account for a substantial amount of the Black-White differential in multiple myeloma incidence.
    American Journal of Public Health 09/2000; 90(8):1277-81. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A population-based case-control study was carried out among 981 men (479 black, 502 white) with pathologically confirmed prostate cancer and 1315 controls (594 black, 721 white). In-person interviews elicited information on sexual behaviour and other potential risk factors for prostate cancer. Blood was drawn for serologic studies in a subset of the cases (n = 276) and controls (n = 295). Prostate cancer risk was increased among men who reported a history of gonorrhoea or syphilis (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6; 95% confidence internal (CI) 1.2-2.1) or showed serological evidence of syphilis (MHA-TP) (OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.0-3.5). Patterns of risk for gonorrhoea and syphilis were similar for blacks (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.2-2.2) and whites (OR = 1.6; 95% CI 0.8-3.2). Risks increased with increasing occurrences of gonorrhoea, rising to OR = 3.3 (95% CI 1.4-7.8) among subjects with three or more events (Ptrend = 0.0005). Frequent sexual encounters with prostitutes and failure to use condoms were also associated with increased risk. Syphilis, gonorrhoea, sex with prostitutes and unprotected sexual intercourse may be indicators of contact with a sexually transmissible factor that increases the risk of prostate cancer.
    British Journal of Cancer 03/2000; 82(3):718-25. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between social class factors and squamous cell esophageal cancer and the extent to which alcohol, tobacco, diet, and social class contribute to the five-fold higher incidence among black than white men in the United States.METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 347 incident cases of squamous cell esophageal cancer (119 white males and 228 black males) and 1354 population-based controls (743 white males and 611 black males) from Atlanta, Detroit, and New Jersey. Risks were estimated using unconditional logistic regression controlling for potential confounders.RESULTS: Elevated risks of squamous cell esophageal cancer were associated with indicators of low social class, especially low annual income. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for subjects with incomes < $10,000 versus incomes of $25,000 or more were 4.3 (95% CI = 2.1–8.7) for whites and 8.0 (95% CI = 4.3–15.0) for blacks. The combination of all four major risk factors: annual income less than $25,000, moderate/heavy use of alcohol, use of tobacco for six months or longer, and consumption of less than 2.5 servings of raw fruits and vegetables per day accounted for almost all of the squamous cell esophageal cancers in whites (98%) and blacks (99%), and for 99% of the excess incidence among black men.CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle modifications, especially a lower intake of alcoholic beverages, would markedly decrease the incidence of this cancer in both races and narrow the racial disparity in risk. Further studies into the determinants of social class may help identify a new set of exposures for this tumor that are amendable to intervention.
    Annals of Epidemiology - ANN EPIDEMIOL. 01/2000; 10(7):468-468.
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    ABSTRACT: In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer conducted in three areas of the USA, 484 cases and 2099 controls were interviewed to evaluate the aetiologic role of several medical conditions/interventions, including diabetes mellitus, cholecystectomy, ulcer/gastrectomy and allergic states. We also evaluated risk associated with family history of cancer. Our findings support previous studies indicating that diabetes is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, as well as a possible complication of the tumour. A significant positive trend in risk with increasing years prior to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was apparent (P-value for test of trend = 0.016), with diabetics diagnosed at least 10 years prior to diagnosis having a significant 50% increased risk. Those treated with insulin had risks similar to those not treated with insulin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6 and 1.5 respectively), and no trend in risk was associated with increasing duration of insulin treatment. Cholecystectomy also appeared to be a risk factor, as well as a consequence of the malignancy. Subjects with a cholecystectomy at least 20 years prior to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer experienced a 70% increased risk, which was marginally significant. In contrast, subjects with a history of duodenal or gastric ulcer had little or no elevated risk (OR = 1.2; confidence interval = 0.9-1.6). Those treated by gastrectomy had the same risk as those not receiving surgery, providing little support for the hypothesis that gastrectomy is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A significant 40% reduced risk was associated with hay fever, a non-significant 50% decreased risk with allergies to animals, and a non-significant 40% reduced risk with allergies to dust/moulds. These associations, however, may be due to chance since no risk reductions were apparent for asthma or several other types of allergies. In addition, we observed significantly increased risks for subjects reporting a first-degree relative with cancers of the pancreas (OR = 3.2), colon (OR = 1.7) or ovary (OR = 5.3) and non-significantly increased risks for cancers of the endometrium (OR = 1.5) or breast (OR = 1.3). The pattern is consistent with the familial predisposition reported for pancreatic cancer and with the array of tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer.
    British Journal of Cancer 09/1999; 80(11):1830-7. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the U.S., the incidence rate of multiple myeloma is more than twice as high for blacks as for whites, but the etiology of this malignancy is not well understood. A population-based case-control interview study of 565 subjects (361 white, 204 black) with multiple myeloma and 2104 controls (1150 white, 954 black) living in 3 areas of the U.S. offered the opportunity to explore whether family history, of cancer contributes to the risk of multiple myeloma and explains the racial disparity in risk. For both races combined, the risk of multiple myeloma was significantly elevated for subjects who reported that a first-degree relative had multiple myeloma (odds ratio [OR] = 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-12.0). Increased risk was also associated with a family history of any hematolymphoproliferative (HLP) cancer (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.0-2.8), especially in a sibling (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.1-4.5). The risk associated with familial occurrence of HLP cancer was higher for blacks than for whites, but the difference between the ORs was not statistically significant. These data are consistent with previous studies that indicate a familial risk of multiple myeloma, but they explain little of the race-related difference in incidence rates.
    Cancer 07/1999; 85(11):2385-90. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relationship between food and beverage consumption and the development of breast cancer in men.Methods: Possible relationships of dietary factors to risk of breast cancer in men were assessed in a case-control study conducted between 1983 and 1986. Cases (N=220) were ascertained from ten population-based cancer registries. Controls (N=291) were selected by random-digit dialing (age 65).Results: No trends in risk were observed with increasing intakes of specific foods, except for an increase in risk with citrus fruits. No increase in risk with increasing amounts of specific fats, vitamins, or minerals or with amounts of protein, fiber, carbohydrate, starches, nitrites, or alcohol consumed was observed, except for an increase in risk with dietary vitamin C consumption. A decreasing trend in risk with dietary niacin and with coffee and an increasing trend in risk with tea consumption were observed. No associations were found with use of any dietary supplements, including vitamin C.Conclusions: The observed associations are not consistent with findings from studies of breast cancer in women and probably do not represent causal relationships. Dietary factors are unlikely to be strong determinants of breast cancer in men.
    Cancer Causes and Control 03/1999; 10(2):107-113. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men in the United States, with substantially higher rates among American blacks than whites. We carried out a population-based case-control study in three geographic areas of the United States to evaluate the reasons for the racial disparity in incidence rates. A total of 932 men (449 black men and 483 white men) who had been newly diagnosed with pathologically confirmed prostate cancer and 1201 controls (543 black men and 658 white men) were interviewed in person to elicit information on potential risk factors. This report evaluates the impact of dietary factors, particularly the consumption of animal products and animal fat, on the risk of prostate cancer among blacks and whites in the United States. Increased consumption (grams/day) of foods high in animal fat was linked to prostate cancer (independent of intake of other calories) among American blacks [by quartile of intake, odds ratio (OR) = 1.0 (referent), 1.5, 2.1, and 2.0; Ptrend = 0.007], but not among American whites [by quartile of intake, OR = 1.0 (referent), 1.6, 1.5, and 1.1; Ptrend = 0.90]. However, risks for advanced prostate cancer were higher with greater intake of foods high in animal fat among blacks [by quartile of intake, OR = 1.0 (referent), 2.2, 4.2, and 3.1; Ptrend = 0.006] and whites [by quartile of intake, OR = 1.0 (referent), 2.2, 2.6, and 2.4; Ptrend = 0.02]. Increased intake of animal fat as a proportion of total caloric intake also showed positive but weaker associations with advanced prostate cancer among blacks (Ptrend = 0.13) and whites (Ptrend = 0.08). No clear associations were found with vitamin A, calcium, or specific lycopene-rich foods. The study linked greater consumption of fat from animal sources to increased risk for prostate cancer among American blacks and to advanced prostate cancer among American blacks and whites. A reduction of fat from animal sources in the diet could lead to decreased incidence and mortality rates for prostate cancer, particularly among American blacks.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 02/1999; 8(1):25-34. · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between diet and pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assessed the role of diet and nutrition as risk factors for pancreatic cancer, using data obtained from direct interviews only, rather than data from less reliable interviews with next of kin. We evaluated whether dietary factors could explain the higher incidence of pancreatic cancer experienced by black Americans compared with white Americans. We conducted a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer diagnosed in Atlanta (GA), Detroit (MI), and 10 New Jersey counties from August 1986 through April 1989. Reliable dietary histories were obtained for 436 patients and 2003 general-population control subjects aged 30-79 years. Obesity was associated with a statistically significant 50%-60% increased risk of pancreatic cancer that was consistent by sex and race. Although the magnitude of risk associated with obesity was identical in blacks and whites, a higher percentage of blacks were obese than were whites (women: 38% versus 16%; men: 27% versus 22%). A statistically significant positive trend in risk was observed with increasing caloric intake, with subjects in the highest quartile of caloric intake experiencing a 70% higher risk than those in the lowest quartile. A statistically significant interaction between body mass index (weight in kg/height in m2 for men and weight in kg/height in m1.5 for women) and total caloric intake was observed that was consistent by sex and race. Subjects in the highest quartile of both body mass index and caloric intake had a statistically significant 180% higher risk than those in the lowest quartile. Obesity is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and appears to contribute to the higher risk of this disease among blacks than among whites in the United States, particularly among women. Furthermore, the interaction between body mass index and caloric intake suggests the importance of energy balance in pancreatic carcinogenesis.
    JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute 12/1998; 90(22):1710-9. · 14.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although prostate cancer is a major disease, causal factors are only partially understood. We examined occupational risk factors for this disease in a large case control study among U.S. blacks and whites. The study included 981 new pathologically confirmed prostate cancer cases (479 blacks and 502 whites) diagnosed between 1986 and 1989, and 1,315 population controls (594 blacks and 721 whites) who resided in Atlanta, Detroit, and 10 countries in New Jersey, covered by population-based cancer registries. Information on occupation, including a lifetime work history, was collected by in-person interview. No clear patterns of risk were found for U.S. whites versus blacks, nor for white-collar versus blue-collar jobs. Farming was related to prostate cancer (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.18-3.98). Risk was restricted, however, to short-term workers and workers in crop production. Risk was not limited to those farming after 1950, when widespread use of pesticides started. Risks increased with increasing years of employment in firefighting (chi 2trend, p = 0.02) and power plant operations (chi 2trend, p = 0.03), and were elevated among long-term railroad line-haulers (OR = 5.85; 95% CI = 1.25-27.4); jobs with potential polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposures. Risk was elevated among athletes (OR = 5.38; 95% CI = 1.48-19.6). However, most of the cases were athletes before 1960, so the potential use of anabolic steroids was excluded. Although some clues about potential occupational associations were found, the overall results show that occupation is not a major determinant of prostate cancer risk.
    American Journal of Industrial Medicine 12/1998; 34(5):421-30. · 1.97 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
757.29 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2004
    • Medical University of South Carolina
      Charleston, South Carolina, United States
  • 1993–2001
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      Bethesda, MD, United States
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      • National Center for Environmental Health
      Druid Hills, GA, United States
  • 1990–2001
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      • • Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      • • Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology
      • • Radiation Epidemiology
      • • Cancer Etiology Branch (CEB)
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 1985–1998
    • Emory University
      • • Department of Epidemiology
      • • School of Medicine
      Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • 1993–1994
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Seattle, WA, United States
  • 1992–1993
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
      • Epidemiology Program
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 1991
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States