Robert N Hoover

National Cancer Institute (USA), 베서스다, Maryland, United States

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Publications (526)4965.35 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We examined lifestyle, occupation, medical history and medication use with multiple myeloma risk in a case-spouse study (481 patients, 351 spouses). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Compared to spouse controls, cases were more likely to have a family history of multiple myeloma (OR: 2.8,95% CI:1.2,6.4) and smoked cigarettes (OR:1.7,95%CI:1.2,2.5), but less likely to have consumed alcohol (OR:0.6,95%CI:0.4,0.9). Nurse/health practitioners (OR:2.8,95%CI:1.3,6.2) and production workers (OR:3.7,95%CI:1.0,13.7) had significantly increased risks; and some occupations linked to diesel exhaust had elevated, but non-significant, risks. History of herpes simplex (OR:1.7,95%CI:1.2,2.4), shingles (OR:1.7,95%CI:1.1,2.7), sexually transmitted diseases (OR:2.0,95%CI:1.0,3.7), and medication allergies (OR:1.7,95%CI:1.2,2.4) were associated with higher risks. Use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, anti-convulsants, antidepressants, statins, and diuretics were associated with reduced risks. Our results are consistent with previous population-based studies, and support the utility of patient databanks and spouse controls as a resource in epidemiologic research.
    Leukemia & lymphoma 09/2015; DOI:10.3109/10428194.2015.1094693 · 2.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ABO blood group has been associated with risk of cancers of the pancreas, stomach, ovary, kidney, and skin, but has not been evaluated in relation to risk of aggressive prostate cancer. We used three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs8176746, rs505922, and rs8176704) to determine ABO genotype in 2,774 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,443 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate age and study-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between blood type, genotype, and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 or locally advanced/metastatic disease (stage T3/T4/N1/M1). We found no association between ABO blood type and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Type A: OR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.87-1.08; Type B: OR = 0.92, 95%CI =n0.77-1.09; Type AB: OR = 1.25, 95%CI = 0.98-1.59, compared to Type O, respectively). Similarly, there was no association between "dose" of A or B alleles and aggressive prostate cancer risk. ABO blood type was not associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Prostate 9999: 1-5, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    The Prostate 08/2015; DOI:10.1002/pros.23035 · 3.57 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 08/2015; 75(15 Supplement):878-878. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2015-878 · 9.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interpretation of biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk associations for prostate cancer is complicated by the relatively large number of risk variants (n=100) and the thousands of surrogate SNPs in linkage disequilibrium. Here we combined three distinct approaches: multiethnic fine-mapping, putative functional annotation (based upon epigenetic data and genome-encoded features), and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses, in an attempt to reduce this complexity. We examined 67 risk regions using genotyping and imputation-based fine-mapping in populations of European (cases/controls: 8,600/6,946), African (cases/controls: 5,327/5,136), Japanese (cases/controls: 2,563/4,391) and Latino (cases/controls: 1,034/1,046) ancestry. Markers at 55 regions passed a region-specific significance threshold (p-value cutoff range: 3.9×10(-4)-5.6×10(-3)) and in 30 regions we identified markers that were more significantly associated with risk than the previously reported variants in the multiethnic sample. Novel secondary signals (p<5.0×10(-6)) were also detected in two regions (rs13062436/3q21 and rs17181170/3p12). Among 666 variants in the 55 regions with p-values within one order of magnitude of the most-associated marker, 193 variants (29%) in 48 regions overlapped with epigenetic or other putative functional marks. In 11 of the 55 regions, cis-eQTLs were detected with nearby genes. For 12 of the 55 regions (22%), the most significant region-specific, prostate-cancer associated variant represented the strongest candidate functional variant based on our annotations; the number of regions increased to 20 (36%) and 27 (49%) when examining the 2 and 3 most significantly associated variants in each region, respectively. These results have prioritized subsets of candidate variants for downstream functional evaluation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email:
    Human Molecular Genetics 07/2015; DOI:10.1093/hmg/ddv269 · 6.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.
    Nature Genetics 06/2015; 47(8). DOI:10.1038/ng.3341 · 29.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2x10(-9), OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83-3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. Copyright © 2015, American Association for Cancer Research.
    Cancer Discovery 06/2015; 5(9). DOI:10.1158/2159-8290.CD-15-0125 · 19.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer in situ (BCIS) diagnoses, a precursor lesion for invasive breast cancer, comprise about 20 % of all breast cancers (BC) in countries with screening programs. Family history of BC is considered one of the strongest risk factors for BCIS. To evaluate the association of BC susceptibility loci with BCIS risk, we genotyped 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), associated with risk of invasive BC, in 1317 BCIS cases, 10,645 invasive BC cases, and 14,006 healthy controls in the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Using unconditional logistic regression models adjusted for age and study, we estimated the association of SNPs with BCIS using two different comparison groups: healthy controls and invasive BC subjects to investigate whether BCIS and BC share a common genetic profile. We found that five SNPs (CDKN2BAS-rs1011970, FGFR2-rs3750817, FGFR2-rs2981582 TNRC9-rs3803662, 5p12-rs10941679) were significantly associated with BCIS risk (p-value adjusted for multiple comparisons <0.0016). Comparing invasive BC and BCIS, the largest difference was for CDKN2BAS-rs1011970 which showed a positive association with BCIS (OR = 1.24, 95 % CI: 1.11-1.38, P = 1.27x10(-4)) and no association with invasive BC (OR = 1.03, 95 % CI: 0.99-1.07, P = 0.06), with a p-value for case-case comparison of 0.006. Subgroup analyses investigating associations with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) found similar associations, albeit less significant (OR = 1.25, 95 % CI: 1.09-1.42, P = 1.07x10(-3)). Additional risk analyses showed significant associations with invasive disease at the 0.05-level for 28 of the alleles and the OR estimates were consistent with those reported by other studies. Our study adds to the knowledge that several of the known BC susceptibility loci are risk factors for both BCIS and invasive BC, with the possible exception of rs1011970, a putatively functional SNP situated in the CDKN2BAS gene that may be a specific BCIS susceptibility locus.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 06/2015; 17(1):82. DOI:10.1186/s13058-015-0596-x · 5.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN) totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L) for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713) and controls (n = 878). The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830). Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186), LRP2 (rs4668123), CYP24A1 (rs2762932), GC (rs2282679), and CUBN (rs1810205) genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037), but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.
    PLoS ONE 06/2015; 10(6):e0129983. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0129983 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are implicated in many normal physiological processes and pathological states, including cancer. For large consortia projects, it may be necessary to make comparisons among studies with different specimens that were not collected specifically to optimize the measurement of IGFs. This study aimed to compare IGFs in matched serum and plasma samples. We measured IGF-I, IGF-II, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-3, C-peptide, and leptin in serum and ethylenediaminetetraacetic-containing-plasma samples obtained concurrently from 30 healthy women aged 64-80 years in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial using chemiluminescent or colorimetric enzyme-linked immune assays. Coefficients of variation (CVs) and correlations were determined. Intraassay CVs ranged from 0.4% for IGFBP-3 to 10% for IGF-II. Mean concentrations of all analytes were higher in the serum, but the differences in mean concentrations of the analytes between serum and plasma were all <11%. Concordance correlation coefficients of matched serum/plasma specimens were 0.92, 0.91, 0.82, 0.96, and 0.99 for IGF-I, IGFBP-3, IGF-II, C-peptide, and leptin, respectively. IGF concentrations measured in serum and plasma are highly correlated but are consistently slightly higher in serum, suggesting that IGF values should be corrected for systematic bias, particularly in consortial efforts when pooling data derived from different specimens.
    06/2015; 7:13-7. DOI:10.4137/BIC.S23088
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    ABSTRACT: Despite progress in identifying genes associated with breast cancer, many more risk loci exist. Genome-wide association analyses in genetically-homogeneous populations, such as that of Sardinia (Italy), could represent an additional approach to detect low penetrance alleles. We performed a genome-wide association study comparing 1431 Sardinian patients with non-familial, BRCA1/2-mutation-negative breast cancer to 2171 healthy Sardinian blood donors. DNA was genotyped using GeneChip Human Mapping 500 K Arrays or Genome-Wide Human SNP Arrays 6.0. To increase genomic coverage, genotypes of additional SNPs were imputed using data from HapMap Phase II. After quality control filtering of genotype data, 1367 cases (9 men) and 1658 controls (1156 men) were analyzed on a total of 2,067,645 SNPs. Overall, 33 genomic regions (67 candidate SNPs) were associated with breast cancer risk at the p < 10(-6) level. Twenty of these regions contained defined genes, including one already associated with breast cancer risk: TOX3. With a lower threshold for preliminary significance to p < 10(-5), we identified 11 additional SNPs in FGFR2, a well-established breast cancer-associated gene. Ten candidate SNPs were selected, excluding those already associated with breast cancer, for technical validation as well as replication in 1668 samples from the same population. Only SNP rs345299, located in intron 1 of VAV3, remained suggestively associated (p-value, 1.16x10(-5)), but it did not associate with breast cancer risk in pooled data from two large, mixed-population cohorts. This study indicated the role of TOX3 and FGFR2 as breast cancer susceptibility genes in BRCA1/2-wild-type breast cancer patients from Sardinian population.
    BMC Cancer 05/2015; 15(1):383. DOI:10.1186/s12885-015-1392-9 · 3.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will experience indolent disease; hence, discovering genetic variants that distinguish aggressive from nonaggressive prostate cancer is of critical clinical importance for disease prevention and treatment. In a multistage, case-only genome-wide association study of 12,518 prostate cancer cases, we identify two loci associated with Gleason score, a pathological measure of disease aggressiveness: rs35148638 at 5q14.3 (RASA1, P=6.49 × 10(-9)) and rs78943174 at 3q26.31 (NAALADL2, P=4.18 × 10(-8)). In a stratified case-control analysis, the SNP at 5q14.3 appears specific for aggressive prostate cancer (P=8.85 × 10(-5)) with no association for nonaggressive prostate cancer compared with controls (P=0.57). The proximity of these loci to genes involved in vascular disease suggests potential biological mechanisms worthy of further investigation.
    Nature Communications 05/2015; 6:6889. DOI:10.1038/ncomms7889 · 11.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We confirmed strong association of rs78378222:A>C (per allele odds ratio = 3.14; P = 6.48×10(-11) ), a germline rare single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TP53, via imputation of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of glioma (1856 cases and 4955 controls). We subsequently performed integrative analyses on the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data for GBM (glioblastoma) and LUAD (lung adenocarcinoma). Based on SNP data, we imputed genotypes for rs78378222 and selected individuals carrying rare risk allele (C). Using RNA sequencing data, we observed aberrant transcripts with ∼3kb longer than normal for those individuals. Using exome sequencing data, we further showed that loss of haplotype carrying common protective allele (A) occurred somatically in GBM but not in LUAD. Our bioinformatic analysis suggests rare risk allele (C) disrupts mRNA termination and an allelic loss of a genomic region harboring common protective allele (A) occurs during tumor initiation or progression for glioma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Human Mutation 04/2015; 36(7). DOI:10.1002/humu.22799 · 5.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Previous studies have identified common germline variants nominally associated with breast cancer survival. These associations have not been widely replicated in further studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of previously reported SNPs with breast cancer-specific survival using data from a pooled analysis of eight breast cancer survival genome-wide association studies (GWAS) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Methods: A literature review was conducted of all previously published associations between common germline variants and three survival outcomes: breast cancer-specific survival, overall survival and disease-free survival. All associations that reached the nominal significance level of P value <0.05 were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms that had been previously reported as nominally associated with at least one survival outcome were evaluated in the pooled analysis of over 37,000 breast cancer cases for association with breast cancer-specific survival. Previous associations were evaluated using a one-sided test based on the reported direction of effect. Results: Fifty-six variants from 45 previous publications were evaluated in the meta-analysis. Fifty-four of these were evaluated in the full set of 37,954 breast cancer cases with 2,900 events and the two additional variants were evaluated in a reduced sample size of 30,000 samples in order to ensure independence from the previously published studies. Five variants reached nominal significance (P <0.05) in the pooled GWAS data compared to 2.8 expected under the null hypothesis. Seven additional variants were associated (P <0.05) with ER-positive disease. Conclusions: Although no variants reached genome-wide significance (P <5 x 10(-8)), these results suggest that there is some evidence of association between candidate common germline variants and breast cancer prognosis. Larger studies from multinational collaborations are necessary to increase the power to detect associations, between common variants and prognosis, at more stringent significance levels.
    Breast Cancer Research 04/2015; 17(1). DOI:10.1186/s13058-015-0570-7 · 5.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P < 5 × 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.
    Nature Genetics 03/2015; DOI:10.1038/ng.3242 · 29.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10(-31)) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 03/2015; 96(3):487-97. DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2015.01.011 · 10.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A prior analysis of postmenopausal breast cancer patients linked a decline in mammographic density (MD) following the initiation of tamoxifen treatment with improved survival, but excluded premenopausal women, for whom tamoxifen is the primary anti-endocrine therapy. Therefore, we evaluated change in MD after tamoxifen and breast cancer death among patients age 32 to 87 years. This case-control study included 349 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients who were treated with tamoxifen at Kaiser Permanente Northwest (1990-2008): 97 who died from breast cancer (case patients) and 252 who did not (control patients), matched on age and year at diagnosis and disease stage. Percent MD in the unaffected breast was measured at baseline (mean six months before tamoxifen initiation) and follow-up (mean 12 months after initiation). Associations between change in MD and breast cancer death were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Patients in the highest tertile of MD decline had a lower risk of breast cancer death when compared with women in the lowest tertile (odds ratio [OR] = 0.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.22 to 0.88); results were similar after adjustment for baseline MD (OR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.23 to 1.02). Reductions in death were observed only among patients in the middle and upper tertiles of baseline MD. Associations did not differ by age, tamoxifen use duration, estrogen and/or progestin use, body mass index, or receipt of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. These data suggest that younger and older ER-positive breast cancer patients who experience large reductions in MD following tamoxifen initiation have an improved prognosis. Published by Oxford University Press 2015.
    JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute 03/2015; 107(3). DOI:10.1093/jnci/dju425 · 12.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a non-steroidal estrogen that was commonly prescribed during pregnancy from the late 1940s to 1971. A potent endocrine disruptor, prenatal DES exposure has been linked with reproductive tract malformations, adverse pregnancy outcomes, cancer, infertility and earlier menopause. DES was used for years as a growth promoter in animal production. Some animal studies suggest that prenatal DES exposure is associated with obesity and metabolic disturbances. Using data from the National Cancer Institute DES Follow-Up Study, we evaluated the association between DES and adult obesity, weight gain from age 20 to mid-life, central adiposity and height among 2871 prenatally exposed and 1352 unexposed women between 23 and 52 years of age (median 41.5) at baseline in 1994. DES exposure status was confirmed by prenatal medical record review. We used multivariable log-binomial models to calculate risk ratios (RRs) for obesity in 2006, and linear regression to calculate mean differences in body mass index, weight gain, waist circumference and height. The adjusted RR for DES and obesity was 1.09 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.97, 1.22], and RRs were 1.23 (CI: 1.07, 1.42) and 1.05 (CI: 0.91, 1.20) for low and high estimated total DES dose, respectively, compared with no exposure. DES-exposed women gained slightly more weight than unexposed women [mean difference, 0.70 kg (CI: -0.27, 1.66)]. This study suggests that prenatal DES exposure may be associated with a small increase in adult obesity.
    Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 02/2015; 6(03):1-7. DOI:10.1017/S2040174415000033 · 0.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The survival of breast cancer patients is largely influenced by tumor characteristics, such as TNM stage, tumor grade and hormone receptor status. However, there is growing evidence that inherited genetic variation might affect the disease prognosis and response to treatment. Several lines of evidence suggest that alleles influencing breast cancer risk might also be associated with breast cancer survival. We examined the associations between 35 breast cancer susceptibility loci and the disease over-all survival (OS) in 10,255 breast cancer patients from the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3) of which 1,379 died, including 754 of breast cancer. We also conducted a meta-analysis of almost 35,000 patients and 5,000 deaths, combining results from BPC3 and the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and performed in silico analyses of SNPs with significant associations. In BPC3, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was significantly associated with improved OS (HRper-allele =0.70; 95% CI: 0.58-0.85; Ptrend =2.84 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes =0.71; 95% CI: 0.55-0.92; HRhomozygotes =0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.76; P2DF =1.45 × 10(-3) ). In silico, the C allele of LSP1-rs3817198 was predicted to increase expression of the tumor suppressor cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C). In the meta-analysis, TNRC9-rs3803662 was significantly associated with increased death hazard (HRMETA =1.09; 95% CI: 1.04-1.15; Ptrend =6.6 × 10(-4) ; HRheterozygotes =0.96 95% CI: 0.90-1.03; HRhomozygotes = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35; P2DF =1.25 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, we show that there is little overlap between the breast cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified so far and the SNPs associated with breast cancer prognosis, with the possible exceptions of LSP1-rs3817198 and TNRC9-rs3803662. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2015 UICC.
    International Journal of Cancer 01/2015; DOI:10.1002/ijc.29446 · 5.09 Impact Factor
  • Robert N Hoover · Stephen J Chanock
    JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute 01/2015; 107(1). DOI:10.1093/jnci/dju398 · 12.58 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

34k Citations
4,965.35 Total Impact Points


  • 1975–2015
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      • • Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      • • Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology
      • • Cancer Etiology Branch (CEB)
      베서스다, Maryland, United States
  • 1973–2015
    • National Institutes of Health
      • • Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
      • • Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis
      • • Branch of Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology
      • • Division of Cancer Prevention
      • • Branch of Radiation Epidemiology
      • • Branch of Epidemiology (EPI)
      베서스다, Maryland, United States
  • 2007–2014
    • NCI-Frederick
      Фредерик, Maryland, United States
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
    • Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center
      Lebanon, New Hampshire, United States
  • 2012
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      Houston, Texas, United States
    • Institute of Cancer Research
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010
    • Tufts Medical Center
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1992–2010
    • Northern Inyo Hospital
      BIH, California, United States
  • 2009
    • Netherlands Cancer Institute
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2007–2009
    • University of Cambridge
      • Department of Oncology
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2003–2008
    • Dartmouth College
      • • Department of Community and Family Medicine
      • • Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
      Hanover, NH, United States
  • 2006
    • University of Alabama in Huntsville
      Huntsville, Alabama, United States
  • 2001–2006
    • Boston University
      • Slone Epidemiology Center
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2002
    • Yale-New Haven Hospital
      • Department of Pathology
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States
  • 1995–2001
    • Emory University
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Atlanta, Georgia, United States
    • University of Arkansas at Little Rock
      Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
    • University of South Florida
      Tampa, Florida, United States
  • 1996
    • University of Toronto
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 1993
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • Breast Service
      New York, New York, United States
  • 1991
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • Department of Environmental and Occupational Health
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
    • Centre for Chronic Disease Control
      New Dilli, NCT, India
  • 1990
    • Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
      Silver Spring, Maryland, United States
    • Uppsala University Hospital
      • Department of Oncology
      Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden
  • 1985
    • Thomas Jefferson University
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States