Patrick B. Hall

York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (184)895.98 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM) is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7 deg$^2$ field with the SDSS-III BOSS spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i_psf=21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1<z<4.5. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 Jan-Jul dark/grey time, with an average cadence of ~4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the CFHT and the Steward Observatory Bok telescopes in 2014, with a cadence of ~2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (RA, DEC=14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM 6-month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ~10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z>0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.
    08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the Data Release 10 Quasar (DR10Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the first 2.5 years of the survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra. The catalog also includes known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 166,583 quasars (74,454 are new discoveries since SDSS-DR9) detected over 6,373 deg$^{2}$ with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with $z>2.15$ (117,668) is $\sim$5 times greater than the number of $z>2.15$ quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII, MgII). The catalog identifies 16,461 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag and information on the optical morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3,600-10,500\AA\ at a spectral resolution in the range 1,300$<$R$<$2,500; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS Catalog Archive Server. We also provide a supplemental list of an additional 2,376 quasars that have been identified among the galaxy targets of the SDSS-III/BOSS.
    11/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We report the results of a new 60 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer S-array (ACIS-S) observation of the reddened, radio-selected, highly polarized `FeLoBAL' quasar FIRST J1556+3517. We investigated a number of models of varied sophistication to fit the 531-photon spectrum. These models ranged from simple power laws to power laws absorbed by hydrogen gas in differing ionization states and degrees of partial covering. Preferred fits indicate that the intrinsic X-ray flux is consistent with that expected for quasars of similarly high luminosity, i.e., an intrinsic, dereddened and unabsorbed optical to X-ray spectral index of -1.7. We cannot tightly constrain the intrinsic X-ray power-law slope, but find indications that it is flat (photon index Gamma = 1.7 or flatter at a >99% confidence for a neutral hydrogen absorber model). Absorption is present, with a column density a few times 10^23 cm^-2, with both partially ionized models and partially covering neutral hydrogen models providing good fits. We present several lines of argument that suggest the fraction of X-ray emissions associated with the radio jet is not large. We combine our Chandra data with observations from the literature to construct the spectral energy distribution of FIRST J1556+3517 from radio to X-ray energies. We make corrections for Doppler beaming for the pole-on radio jet, optical dust reddening, and X-ray absorption, in order to recover a probable intrinsic spectrum. The quasar FIRST J1556+3517 seems to be an intrinsically normal radio-quiet quasar with a reddened optical/UV spectrum, a Doppler-boosted but intrinsically weak radio jet, and an X-ray absorber not dissimilar from that of other broad absorption line quasars.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2013; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Microlensing observations indicate that quasar accretion discs have half-light radii larger than expected from standard theoretical predictions based on quasar fluxes or black hole masses. Blackburne and colleagues have also found a very weak wavelength dependence of these half-light radii. We consider disc temperature profile models that might match these observations. Nixon and colleagues have suggested that misaligned accretion discs around spinning black holes will be disrupted at radii small enough for the Lense-Thirring torque to overcome the disc's viscous torque. Gas in precessing annuli torn off a disc will spread radially and intersect with the remaining disc, heating the disc at potentially large radii. However, if the intersection occurs at an angle of more than a degree or so, highly supersonic collisions will shock-heat the gas to a Compton temperature of T~10^7 K, and the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of discs with such shock-heated regions are poor fits to observations of quasar SEDs. Torn discs where heating occurs in intermittent weak shocks that occur whenever the intersection angle reaches a tenth of a degree pose less of a conflict with observations, but do not have significantly larger half-light radii than standard discs. We also study two phenomenological disc temperature profile models. We find that discs with a temperature spike at relatively large radii and lowered temperatures at radii inside the spike yield improved and acceptable fits to microlensing sizes in most cases. Such temperature profiles could in principle occur in sub-Keplerian discs partially supported by magnetic pressure. However, such discs overpredict the fluxes from quasars studied with microlensing except in the limit of negligible continuum emission from radii inside the temperature spike.
    08/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of seventeen broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with high-ionization troughs that include absorption redshifted relative to the quasar rest frame. The redshifted troughs extend to velocities up to v=12,000 km/s and the trough widths exceed 3000 km/s in all but one case. Approximately 1 in 1000 BAL quasars with blueshifted C IV absorption also has redshifted C IV absorption; objects with C IV absorption present only at redshifted velocities are roughly four times rarer. In more than half of our objects, redshifted absorption is seen in C II or Al III as well as C IV, making low-ionization absorption at least ten times more common among BAL quasars with redshifted troughs than among standard BAL quasars. However, the C IV absorption equivalent widths in our objects are on average smaller than those of standard BAL quasars with low-ionization absorption. We consider several possible ways of generating redshifted absorption. The two most likely possibilities may be at work simultaneously, in the same objects or in different ones. Rotationally dominated outflows seen against a quasar's extended continuum source can produce redshifted and blueshifted absorption, but variability consistent with this scenario is seen in only one of the four objects with multiple spectra. The infall of relatively dense and low-ionization gas to radii as small as 400 Schwarzschild radii can in principle explain the observed range of trough profiles, but current models do not easily explain the origin and survival of such gas. Whatever the origin(s) of the absorbing gas in these objects, it must be located at small radii to explain its large redshifted velocities, and thus offers a novel probe of the inner regions of quasars.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 06/2013; 434(1). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) is designed to measure the scale of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter over a larger volume than the combined efforts of all previous spectroscopic surveys of large scale structure. BOSS uses 1.5 million luminous galaxies as faint as i=19.9 over 10,000 square degrees to measure BAO to redshifts z<0.7. Observations of neutral hydrogen in the Lyman alpha forest in more than 150,000 quasar spectra (g<22) will constrain BAO over the redshift range 2.15<z<3.5. Early results from BOSS include the first detection of the large-scale three-dimensional clustering of the Lyman alpha forest and a strong detection from the Data Release 9 data set of the BAO in the clustering of massive galaxies at an effective redshift z = 0.57. We project that BOSS will yield measurements of the angular diameter distance D_A to an accuracy of 1.0% at redshifts z=0.3 and z=0.57 and measurements of H(z) to 1.8% and 1.7% at the same redshifts. Forecasts for Lyman alpha forest constraints predict a measurement of an overall dilation factor that scales the highly degenerate D_A(z) and H^{-1}(z) parameters to an accuracy of 1.9% at z~2.5 when the survey is complete. Here, we provide an overview of the selection of spectroscopic targets, planning of observations, and analysis of data and data quality of BOSS.
    The Astronomical Journal 07/2012; 145(1). · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A search for emission lines in foreground galaxies in quasar spectra (zgal < zQSO) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 5 reveals 23 examples of quasars shining through low redshift, foreground galaxies at small impact parameters (<10 kpc). About 74 000 quasar spectra were examined by searching for narrow Hα emission lines at z < 0.38, at a flux level greater than 5 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1, and then confirming that other expected emission lines of the H II regions in the galaxy are detected. The galaxies were deblended from the quasar images to get colours and morphologies. For cases that allow the galaxy and the quasar to be deblended, the galaxies are blue (0.95 < (u-r) < 1.95). Extinction and reddening through the galaxies are determined from the (g-i) colour excess of the quasars. These reddening values are compared with the flux ratio of Hα to Hβ, which reflect the extinction for an undetermined fraction of the sightline through each galaxy. No trends were found relating E(B-V)(g-i), impact parameter (b), and (u-r) for the galaxies or between E(B-V) derived from (g-i) and that derived from Hα/Hβ. Comparison with previous studies of quasar absorption systems indicates that our sample is more reddened, suggesting disc-dominated absorber galaxies. Measurement or limits on galactic, interstellar Ca II and Na I absorption lines are given from the quasar spectrum. No trends were found relating the Ca II equivalent width W (Ca II) or the Na I equivalent width W (Na I) to b, but a correlation of rs=-0.77 (α= 0.05) was found relating W (Ca II) and E(B-V)(g-i).
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 07/2012; 423(4):3692-3708. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A search for emission lines in foreground galaxies in quasar spectra (z(gal) < z(QSO)) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 5 (DR5) reveals 23 examples of quasars shining through low redshift, foreground galaxies at small impact parameters (< 10 kpc). About 74,000 quasar spectra were examined by searching for narrow H{\alpha} emission lines at z < 0.38, at a flux level greater than 5 \times 10^-17 ergs cm^-2 s^-1, then confirming that other expected emission lines of the H II regions in the galaxy are detected. The galaxies were deblended from the quasar images to get colors and morphologies. For cases that allow the galaxy and the quasar to be deblended, the galaxies are blue (0.95 <(u-r)< 1.95). Extinction and reddening through the galaxies is determined from the (g-i) color excesses of the quasars. These reddening values are compared with the flux ratio of H{\alpha} to H{\beta}, which reflect the extinction for an undetermined fraction of the sightline through each galaxy. No trends were found relating E(B-V)_(g-i), impact parameter (b), and (u-r) for the galaxies or between E(B-V) derived from (g-i) and that derived from H{\alpha}/H{\beta}. Comparison with previous studies of quasar absorption systems indicate our sample is more reddened, suggesting disk-dominated absorber galaxies. Measurement or limits on galactic, interstellar Ca II and Na I absorption lines are given from the quasar spectrum. No trends were found relating Ca II equivalent width (W (Ca II)) or Na I equivalent width (W (Na I)) to b, but a correlation of r_s = -0.77 ({\alpha} = 0.05) was found relating W (Ca II) and E(B-V)(g-i) .
    04/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the final statistical sample of lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The well-defined statistical lens sample consists of 26 lensed quasars brighter than i = 19.1 and in the redshift range of 0.6 < z < 2.2 selected from 50,826 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), where we restrict the image separation range to 1'' < θ < 20'' and the i-band magnitude differences in two images to be smaller than 1.25 mag. The SDSS DR7 quasar catalog also contains 36 additional lenses identified with various techniques. In addition to these lensed quasars, we have identified 81 pairs of quasars from follow-up spectroscopy, 26 of which are physically associated binary quasars. The statistical lens sample covers a wide range of image separations, redshifts, and magnitudes, and therefore is suitable for systematic studies of cosmological parameters and surveys of the structure and evolution of galaxies and quasars.
    The Astronomical Journal 04/2012; 143(5):119. · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Broad Absorption Line (BAL) trough variability is predominantly due to cloud motion transverse to our line of sight. The rate at which the variability occurs indicates the velocity of the cloud, which can provide constraints on the cloud's distance from the central source. This requires detailed spectroscopy during a variability event. Such spectra have proven elusive, suggesting either the timescale of variability is too short to be caught, or too long to notice until a sufficient amount of time has passed. Photometric monitoring of BAL quasar colours may potentially be used as an early warning system to trigger time resolved spectroscopic monitoring of BAL variability. Towards this end, we are analyzing both BAL and non-BAL colour variability using time series photometry from Stripe 82 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.
    03/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We report on the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of 11 radio-quiet quasars with weak or no emission lines identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with redshift z = 0.4-2.5. Our sample was selected from the Plotkin et al. catalog of radio-quiet, weak-featured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The distribution of relative X-ray brightness for our low-redshift weak-line quasar (WLQ) candidates is significantly different from that of typical radio-quiet quasars, having an excess of X-ray weak sources, but it is consistent with that of high-redshift WLQs. Over half of the low-redshift WLQ candidates are X-ray weak by a factor of 5, compared to a typical SDSS quasar with similar UV/optical luminosity. These X-ray weak sources generally show similar UV emission-line properties to those of the X-ray weak quasar PHL 1811 (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines, weak semiforbidden lines, and strong UV Fe emission); they may belong to the notable class of PHL 1811 analogs. The average X-ray spectrum of these sources is somewhat harder than that of typical radio-quiet quasars. Several other low-redshift WLQ candidates have normal ratios of X-ray-to-optical/UV flux, and their average X-ray spectral properties are also similar to those of typical radio-quiet quasars. The X-ray weak and X-ray normal WLQ candidates may belong to the same subset of quasars having high-ionization "shielding gas" covering most of the wind-dominated broad emission-line region, but be viewed at different inclinations. The mid-infrared-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these sources are generally consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars, showing that they are not likely to be BL Lac objects with relativistically boosted continua and diluted emission lines. The mid-infrared-to-UV SEDs of most radio-quiet weak-featured AGNs without sensitive X-ray coverage (34 objects) are also consistent with those of typical SDSS quasars. However, one source in our X-ray-observed sample is remarkably strong in X-rays, indicating that a small fraction of low-redshift WLQ candidates may actually be BL Lac objects residing in the radio-faint tail of the BL Lac population. We also investigate universal selection criteria for WLQs over a wide range of redshift, finding that it is not possible to select WLQ candidates in a fully consistent way using different prominent emission lines (e.g., Lyα, C IV, Mg II, and Hβ) as a function of redshift.
    The Astrophysical Journal 02/2012; 747(1):10. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on a population of X-ray weak quasars with similar UV emission-line properties to those of the remarkable quasar PHL 1811. All radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of ~13, with hints of heavy X-ray absorption. Correlations between the X-ray weakness and UV emission-line properties suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions (BELRs). We propose an AGN geometry that can potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and the general population of weak-line quasars.
    01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We present optical to far-infrared photometry of 31 reddened QSOs that show evidence for radiatively driven outflows originating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in their rest-frame UV spectra. We use these data to study the relationships between the AGN-driven outflows, and the AGN and starburst infrared luminosities. We find that FeLoBAL QSOs are invariably IR-luminous, with IR luminosities exceeding 1012 L ☉ in all cases. The AGN supplies 76% of the total IR emission, on average, but with a range from 20% to 100%. We find no evidence that the absolute luminosity of obscured star formation is affected by the AGN-driven outflows. Conversely, we find an anticorrelation between the strength of AGN-driven outflows, as measured from the range of outflow velocities over which absorption exceeds a minimal threshold, and the contribution from star formation to the total IR luminosity, with a much higher chance of seeing a starburst contribution in excess of 25% in systems with weak outflows than in systems with strong outflows. Moreover, we find no convincing evidence that this effect is driven by the IR luminosity of the AGN. We conclude that radiatively driven outflows from AGNs can have a dramatic, negative impact on luminous star formation in their host galaxies. We find that such outflows act to curtail star formation such that star formation contributes less than ~25% of the total IR luminosity. We also propose that the degree to which termination of star formation takes place is not deducible from the IR luminosity of the AGN.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2012; 745(2):178. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    Jesse A. Rogerson, Patrick B. Hall
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    ABSTRACT: We test whether the Tinker & Chen model of MgII absorption due to the gaseous halo around a galaxy can reproduce absorption in quasar pairs (both lensed and physical) and lensed triples and quads from the literature. These quasars exhibit absorption from a total of 38 MgII systems spanning z=0.043 - 2.066 with mean redshift =1.099 and weighted mean rest-frame equivalent width of 0.87 Ang. Using the Tinker & Chen model to generate simulated sight-lines, we marginalize the unknown parameters of the absorbing galaxies: dark matter halo mass, impact parameter, and azimuthal angle on the sky. We determine the ability of the model to statistically reproduce the observed variation in MgII absorption strength between paired sight-lines for different values of the gas covering fraction f_c and the characteristic length scale ell_c, within which the variation in absorption equivalent widths between sight-lines exponentially decreases. We find a best-fit f_c=0.60 \pm 0.15 and ell_c<8/h_70 kpc (1\sigma confidence limits), with smaller f_c allowed at larger ell_c. At 99.7% confidence, we are able to rule out f_c>0.87 for all values of ell_c and the region where ell_c<1.0/h_70 kpc and f_c<0.3.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2011; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use SDSS spectra and optical to far-infrared photometry for a sample of 31 FeLoBAL QSOs to study the relationship between the AGN-driven outflows, and obscured star formation in their host galaxies. We find that FeLoBAL QSOs invariably have IR luminosities exceeding 10^12 Solar luminosities. The AGN supplies 75% of the total IR emission, on average, but with a range from 20% to 100%. We find a clear anticorrelation between the strength of the AGN-driven outflows and the contribution from star formation to the total IR luminosity, with a much higher chance of seeing a starburst contribution in excess of 25% in systems with weak outflows than in systems with strong outflows. Moreover, we find no evidence that this effect is driven by the IR luminosity of the AGN. We conclude that radiatively driven outflows from AGN act to curtail obscured star formation in the host galaxies of reddened QSOs to less than ~25% of the total IR luminosity. This is the most direct evidence yet obtained for `quasar mode' AGN feedback.
    12/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: We provide a quantitative description and statistical interpretation of the optical continuum variability of quasars. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has obtained repeated imaging in five UV-to-IR photometric bands for 33,881 spectroscopically confirmed quasars. About 10,000 quasars have an average of 60 observations in each band obtained over a decade along Stripe 82 (S82), whereas the remaining ~25,000 have 2-3 observations due to scan overlaps. The observed time lags span the range from a day to almost 10 years, and constrain quasar variability at rest-frame time lags of up to 4 years, and at rest-frame wavelengths from 1000A to 6000A. We publicly release a user-friendly catalog of quasars from the SDSS Data Release 7 that have been observed at least twice in SDSS or once in both SDSS and the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey, and we use it to analyze the ensemble properties of quasar variability. Based on a damped random walk (DRW) model defined by a characteristic time scale and an asymptotic variability amplitude that scale with the luminosity, black hole mass, and rest wavelength for individual quasars calibrated in S82, we can fully explain the ensemble variability statistics of the non-S82 quasars such as the exponential distribution of large magnitude changes. All available data are consistent with the DRW model as a viable description of the optical continuum variability of quasars on time scales of ~5-2000 days in the rest frame. We use these models to predict the incidence of quasar contamination in transient surveys such as those from PTF and LSST.
    The Astrophysical Journal 12/2011; 753(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the restframe UV, two of the parameters that best characterize the range of emission-line properties in quasar broad emission-line regions are the equivalent width and the blueshift of the CIV line relative to the quasar rest frame. We explore the connection between these emission-line properties and the UV through X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) for radio-quiet (RQ) quasars. Our sample consists of a heterogeneous compilation of 406 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Palomar-Green survey that have well-measured CIV emission-line and X-ray properties (including 164 objects with measured Gamma). We find that RQ quasars with both strong CIV emission and small CIV blueshifts can be classified as "hard-spectrum" sources that are (relatively) strong in the X-ray as compared to the UV. On the other hand, RQ quasars with both weak CIV emission and large CIV blueshifts are instead "soft-spectrum" sources that are (relatively) weak in the X-ray as compared to the UV. This work helps to further bridge optical/soft X-ray "Eigenvector 1" relationships to the UV and hard X-ray. Based on these findings, we argue that future work should consider systematic errors in bolometric corrections (and thus accretion rates) that are derived from a single mean SED. Detailed analysis of the CIV emission line may allow for SED-dependent corrections to these quantities.
    The Astronomical Journal 09/2011; 142(4). · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the results from Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 10 type 1 quasars selected to have unusual UV emission-line properties (weak and blueshifted high-ionization lines; strong UV Fe emission) similar to those of PHL 1811, a confirmed intrinsically X-ray weak quasar. These quasars were identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at high redshift (z 2.2); eight are radio quiet while two are radio intermediate. All of the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, without exception, are notably X-ray weak by a mean factor of 13. These sources lack broad absorption lines and have blue UV/optical continua, supporting the hypothesis that they are intrinsically X-ray weak like PHL 1811 itself. However, their average X-ray spectrum appears to be harder than those of typical quasars, which may indicate the presence of heavy intrinsic X-ray absorption. Our sample of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs supports a connection between an X-ray weak spectral energy distribution and PHL 1811-like UV emission lines; this connection provides an economical way to identify X-ray weak type 1 quasars. The fraction of radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs in the radio-quiet quasar population is estimated to be 1.2%. We have investigated correlations between relative X-ray brightness and UV emission-line properties (e.g., C IV equivalent width and blueshift) for a sample combining our radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs, PHL 1811 itself, and typical type 1 quasars. These correlation analyses suggest that PHL 1811 analogs may have extreme wind-dominated broad emission-line regions. Observationally, the radio-quiet PHL 1811 analogs appear to be a subset (30%) of radio-quiet weak-line quasars (WLQs). The existence of a subset of quasars in which high-ionization "shielding gas" covers most of the broad emission-line region (BELR), but little more than the BELR, could potentially unify the PHL 1811 analogs and WLQs. The two radio-intermediate PHL 1811 analogs are X-ray bright. X-ray spectral analyses and consideration of their multiwavelength properties suggest that one of them has jet-dominated X-ray emission, while the nature of the other remains unclear.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2011; 736(1):28. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a compilation of properties of the 105,783 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (DR7) quasar catalog. In this product, we compile continuum and emission line measurements around the Hα, Hβ, Mg II, and C IV regions, as well as other quantities such as radio properties, and flags indicating broad absorption line quasars, disk emitters, etc. We also compile virial black hole mass estimates based on various calibrations. For the fiducial virial mass estimates we use the Vestergaard & Peterson (VP06) calibrations for Hβ and C IV, and our own calibration for Mg II which matches the VP06 Hβ masses on average. We describe the construction of this catalog and discuss its limitations. The catalog and its future updates will be made publicly available online.
    The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 06/2011; 194(2):45. · 16.24 Impact Factor
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    Patrick B. Hall, Laura S. Chajet
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    ABSTRACT: It has been argued that certain broad absorption line quasars are viewed within 35 degrees of the axis of a relativistic radio jet, based on two-epoch radio flux density variability. It is true if the surface brightness of a radio source is observed to change by a sufficiently large amount, the inferred brightness temperature will exceed 10^12 K and Doppler beaming in our direction must be invoked to avoid a Compton cooling catastrophe. However, flux density changes cannot be linked to surface brightness changes without knowledge of the size of the source. If an optically thick source changes in projected area but not surface brightness, its brightness temperature is constant and its flux variability yields no constraint on its orientation. Moreover, as pointed out by Rees, spherical expansion of an emission source at relativistic speeds yields an apparently superluminal increase in its projected area, which can explain short-timescale flux density variability without requiring a relativistic jet oriented near to our line of sight. Therefore, two-epoch radio flux density variability by itself cannot unambiguously identify sources with jets directed towards us. Only VLBI imaging can robustly determine the fraction of broad absorption line quasars which are polar.
    05/2011;

Publication Stats

6k Citations
895.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2012
    • York University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2003–2009
    • University of Chicago
      • • Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics
      • • Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2001–2008
    • Pontifical Catholic University of Chile
      • • Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica
      • • Departamento de Anatomía
      Santiago, Region Metropolitana de Santiago, Chile
  • 2000–2008
    • Princeton University
      • Department of Astrophysical Sciences
      Princeton, NJ, United States
  • 2007
    • University of Cambridge
      • Institute of Astronomy
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2001–2007
    • University of Toronto
      • • Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
      • • Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2006
    • University of California, Davis
      • Department of Physics
      Davis, California, United States
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2002
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Astronomy
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 1995–2000
    • The University of Arizona
      • Department of Astronomy
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 1970
    • National Optical Astronomy Observatory
      Tucson, Arizona, United States