J. C. Raymond

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Are you J. C. Raymond?

Claim your profile

Publications (653)1930.24 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report results from Spitzer observations of SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B, a young Type Ia supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud that shows interaction with a dense medium in its western hemisphere. Our images show that N103B has strong IR emission from warm dust in the post-shock environment. The post-shock gas density we derive, 45 cm$^{-3}$, is much higher than in other Type Ia remnants in the LMC, though a lack of spatial resolution may bias measurements towards regions of higher than average density. This density is similar to that in Kepler's SNR, a Type Ia interacting with a circumstellar medium. Optical images show H$\alpha$ emission along the entire periphery of the western portion of the shock, with [O III] and [S II] lines emitted from a few dense clumps of material where the shock has become radiative. The dust is silicate in nature, though standard silicate dust models fail to reproduce the "18 $\mu$m" silicate feature that peaks instead at 17.3 $\mu$m. We propose that the dense material is circumstellar material lost from the progenitor system, as with Kepler. If the CSM interpretation is correct, this remnant would become the second member, along with Kepler, of a class of Type Ia remnants characterized by interaction with a dense CSM hundreds of years post-explosion. A lack of N enhancement eliminates symbiotic AGB progenitors. The white dwarf companion must have been relatively unevolved at the time of the explosion.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2014; 790(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Extreme-ultraviolet images of Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly show striations related to the magnetic field structure in both open and closed magnetic regions. The brightness contrast implies coronal density contrasts of at least a factor of six between neighboring flux tubes over scales of a few thousand kilometers. These density structures imply variations in the Alfvén speed on a similar scale. They will drastically affect the propagation and dissipation of Alfvén waves, and that should be taken into account in models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. In each striation, the cometary emission moves along the magnetic field and broadens with time. The speed and the rate of broadening are related to the parallel and perpendicular components of the velocities of the cometary neutrals when they become ionized. We use a magnetohydrodynamic model of the coronal magnetic field and the theory of pickup ions to compare the measurements with theoretical predictions, in particular with the energy lost to Alfvén waves as the cometary ions isotropize.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2014; 788(2):152. · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: EUV images of Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) from the AIA show striations related to the magnetic field structure in both open and closed magnetic regions. The brightness contrast implies coronal density contrasts of at least a factor of 6 between neighboring flux tubes over scales of a few thousand km. These density structures imply variations in the Alfven speed on a similar scale. They will drastically affect the propagation and dissipation of Alfven waves, and that should be taken into account in models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. In each striation, the cometary emission moves along the magnetic field and broadens with time. The speed and the rate of broadening are related to the parallel and perpendicular components of the velocities of the cometary neutrals when they become ionized. We use an MHD model of the coronal magnetic field and the theory of pickup ions to compare the measurements with theoretical predictions, in particular with the energy lost to Alfven waves as the cometary ions isotropize.
    05/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: EUV images of Comet Lovejoy (C/2011 W3) from the AIA show striations related to the magnetic field structure in both open and closed magnetic regions. The brightness contrast implies coronal density contrasts of at least a factor of 6 between neighboring flux tubes over scales of a few thousand km. These density structures imply variations in the Alfven speed on a similar scale. They will drastically affect the propagation and dissipation of Alfven waves, and that should be taken into account in models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. In each striation, the cometary emission moves along the magnetic field and broadens with time. The speed and the rate of broadening are related to the parallel and perpendicular components of the velocities of the cometary neutrals when they become ionized. We use an MHD model of the coronal magnetic field and the theory of pickup ions to compare the measurements with theoretical predictions, in particular with the energy lost to Alfven waves as the cometary ions isotropize.
    04/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report on spectra of two positions in the XA region of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant obtained with the InfraRed Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra span the 10-35 micron wavelength range, which contains a number of collisionally excited forbidden lines. These data are supplemented by optical spectra obtained at the Whipple Observatory and an archival UV spectrum from the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Coverage from the UV through the IR provides tests of shock wave models and tight constraints on model parameters. Only lines from high ionization species are detected in the spectrum of a filament on the edge of the remnant. The filament traces a 180 km/s shock that has just begun to cool, and the oxygen to neon abundance ratio lies in the normal range found for Galactic H II regions. Lines from both high and low ionization species are detected in the spectrum of the cusp of a shock-cloud interaction, which lies within the remnant boundary. The spectrum of the cusp region is matched by a shock of about 150 km/s that has cooled and begun to recombine. The post-shock region has a swept-up column density of about 1.3E18 cm^-2, and the gas has reached a temperature of 7000 to 8000 K. The spectrum of the Cusp indicates that roughly half of the refractory silicon and iron atoms have been liberated from the grains. Dust emission is not detected at either position.
    03/2014; 787(1).
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We have detected emission in C IV λλ1548,1551 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a shock wave in the Cygnus Loop using COS on HST. The intensity agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates assumed. However, the CIV intensity 10" behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25" behind it. Projection effects and a complex geometry are probably responsible for the discrepancy.
    01/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Cygnus Loop supernova remnant serves as an excellent laboratory for the study of radiative and non-radiative shocks with speeds in the 150-450 km s-1 range. We present results on shock-excited emission and dust destruction based on Spitzer Space Telescope observations of two well-studied regions in the remnant, (i) a non-radiative shock filament along the NE limb, and (ii) the XA region, characterized by emission from bright radiative shocks.
    12/2013;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The magnetic field plays a pivotal role in many fields of Astrophysics. This is especially true for the physics of the solar atmosphere. Measuring the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere is crucial to understand the nature of the underlying physical processes that drive the violent dynamics of the solar corona—that can also affect life on Earth. SolmeX, a fully equipped solar space observatory for remote-sensing observations, will provide the first comprehensive measurements of the strength and direction of the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere. The mission consists of two spacecraft, one carrying the instruments, and another one in formation flight at a distance of about 200 m carrying the occulter to provide an artificial total solar eclipse. This will ensure high-quality coronagraphic observations above the solar limb. SolmeX integrates two spectro-polarimetric coronagraphs for off-limb observations, one in the EUV and one in the IR, and three instruments for observations on the disk. The latter comprises one imaging polarimeter in the EUV for coronal studies, a spectro-polarimeter in the EUV to investigate the low corona, and an imaging spectro-polarimeter in the UV for chromospheric studies. SOHO and other existing missions have investigated the emission of the upper atmosphere in detail (not considering polarization), and as this will be the case also for missions planned for the near future. Therefore it is timely that SolmeX provides the final piece of the observational quest by measuring the magnetic field in the upper atmosphere through polarimetric observations.
    European Solar Physics Meeting (ESPM-13); 12/2013
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Phosphorus ((31)P), which is essential for life, is thought to be synthesized in massive stars and dispersed into interstellar space when these stars explode as supernovae (SNe). Here, we report on near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the young SN remnant Cassiopeia A, which show that the abundance ratio of phosphorus to the major nucleosynthetic product iron ((56)Fe) in SN material is up to 100 times the average ratio of the Milky Way, confirming that phosphorus is produced in SNe. The observed range is compatible with predictions from SN nucleosynthetic models but not with the scenario in which the chemical elements in the inner SN layers are completely mixed by hydrodynamic instabilities during the explosion.
    Science 12/2013; 342(6164):1346-1348. · 31.20 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Major solar eruptive events (SEEs), consisting of both a large flare and a near simultaneous large fast coronal mass ejection (CME), are the most powerful explosions and also the most powerful and energetic particle accelerators in the solar system, producing solar energetic particles (SEPs) up to tens of GeV for ions and hundreds of MeV for electrons. The intense fluxes of escaping SEPs are a major hazard for humans in space and for spacecraft. Furthermore, the solar plasma ejected at high speed in the fast CME completely restructures the interplanetary medium (IPM) - major SEEs therefore produce the most extreme space weather in geospace, the interplanetary medium, and at other planets. Thus, understanding the flare/CME energy release process(es) and the related particle acceleration processes are major goals in Heliophysics. To make the next major breakthroughs, we propose a new mission concept, SEE 2020, a single spacecraft with a complement of advanced new instruments that focus directly on the coronal energy release and particle acceleration sites, and provide the detailed diagnostics of the magnetic fields, plasmas, mass motions, and energetic particles required to understand the fundamental physical processes involved.
    11/2013;
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The magnetic field plays a pivotal role in many fields of Astrophysics. This is especially true for the physics of the solar atmosphere. Measuring the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere is crucial to understand the nature of the underlying physical processes that drive the violent dynamics of the solar corona—that can also affect life on Earth. SolmeX, a fully equipped solar space observatory for remote-sensing observations, will provide the first comprehensive measurements of the strength and direction of the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere. The mission consists of two spacecraft, one carrying the instruments, and another one in formation flight at a distance of about 200 m carrying the occulter to provide an artificial total solar eclipse. This will ensure high-quality coronagraphic observations above the solar limb. SolmeX integrates two spectro-polarimetric coronagraphs for off-limb observations, one in the EUV and one in the IR, and three instruments for observations on the disk. The latter comprises one imaging polarimeter in the EUV for coronal studies, a spectro-polarimeter in the EUV to investigate the low corona, and an imaging spectro-polarimeter in the UV for chromospheric studies. SOHO and other existing missions have investigated the emission of the upper atmosphere in detail (not considering polarization), and as this will be the case also for missions planned for the near future. Therefore it is timely that SolmeX provides the final piece of the observational quest by measuring the magnetic field in the upper atmosphere through polarimetric observations.
    Experimental Astronomy 11/2013; · 2.97 Impact Factor
  • E. Landi, M. P. Miralles, J. C. Raymond, H. Hara
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We analyze coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board Hinode of an X-ray Plasma Ejection (XPE) that occurred during the coronal mass ejection (CME) event of 2008 April 9. The XPE was trailing the CME core from behind, following the same trajectory, and could be identified both in EIS and XRT observations. Using the EIS spectrometer, we have determined the XPE plasma parameters, measuring the electron density, thermal distribution, and elemental composition. We have found that the XPE composition and electron density were very similar to those of the pre-event active region plasma. The XPE temperature was higher, and its thermal distribution peaked at around 3 MK also, typical flare lines were absent from EIS spectra, indicating that any XPE component with temperatures in excess of 5 MK was likely either faint or absent. We used XRT data to investigate the presence of hotter plasma components in the XPE that could have gone undetected by EIS and found that—if at all present—these components have small emission measure values and their temperature is in the 8-12.5 MK range. The very hot plasma found in earlier XPE observations obtained by Yohkoh seems to be largely absent in this CME, although plasma ionization timescales may lead to non-equilibrium ionization effects that could make bright lines from ions formed in a 10 MK plasma not detectable by EIS. Our results supersede the XPE findings of Landi et al., who studied the same event with older response functions for the XRT Al-poly filter; the differences in the results stress the importance of using accurate filter response functions.
    The Astrophysical Journal 11/2013; 778(1):29-. · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV $\lambda$1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10" behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25" behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2013; 778(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The current sheet that extends from the top of flare loops and connects to an associated flux rope is a common structure in models of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). To understand the observational properties of CME current sheets, we generated predictions from a flare/CME model to be compared with observations. We use a simulation of a large-scale CME current sheet previously reported by Reeves et al. This simulation includes ohmic and coronal heating, thermal conduction, and radiative cooling in the energy equation. Using the results of this simulation, we perform time-dependent ionization calculations of the flow in a CME current sheet and construct two-dimensional spatial distributions of ionic charge states for multiple chemical elements. We use the filter responses from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the predicted intensities of emission lines to compute the count rates for each of the AIA bands. The results show differences in the emission line intensities between equilibrium and non-equilibrium ionization. The current sheet plasma is underionized at low heights and overionized at large heights. At low heights in the current sheet, the intensities of the AIA 94 Å and 131 Å channels are lower for non-equilibrium ionization than for equilibrium ionization. At large heights, these intensities are higher for non-equilibrium ionization than for equilibrium ionization inside the current sheet. The assumption of ionization equilibrium would lead to a significant underestimate of the temperature low in the current sheet and overestimate at larger heights. We also calculate the intensities of ultraviolet lines and predict emission features to be compared with events from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, including a low-intensity region around the current sheet corresponding to this model.
    The Astrophysical Journal 07/2013; 773(2):110. · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We perform a set of two dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the reconnection process occurring in current sheets that develop during solar eruptions. Reconnection commences gradually and produces small-scale structures inside the current sheet, which has one end anchored to the bottom boundary and the other end open. The main features we study include plasmoids (or plasma blobs) flowing in the sheet, and X-points between pairs of adjacent islands. The statistical properties of the fine structure and the dependence of the spectral energy on these properties are examined. The flux and size distribution functions of plasmoids roughly follow inverse square power laws at large scales. The mass distribution function is steep at large scales and shallow at small scales. The size distribution also shows that plasmoids are highly asymmetric soon after being formed, while older plasmoids tend to be more circular. The spectral profiles of magnetic and kinetic energy inside the current sheet are both consistent with a power law. The corresponding spectral indices γ are found to vary with the magnetic Reynolds number Rm of the system, but tend to approach a constant for large Rm (>105). The motion and growth of blobs change the spectral index. The growth of new islands causes the power spectrum to steepen, but it becomes shallower when old and large plasmoids leave the computational domain.
    Physics of Plasmas 07/2013; 20(7). · 2.38 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We characterize the physical properties of two coronal streamers during Earth/Ulysses quadrature configurations for the previous two solar minimum periods. Comparisons between coronal remote-sensing observations and in situ measurements of solar wind plasma properties are being used to characterize the origin of slow wind streams. In order to investigate slow solar wind heating and acceleration, we compare the measurements with predictions from MHD models. We aim to use the empirical measurements to distinguish between different proposed physical processes for the slow solar wind. This work is supported by NASA grant NNX10AQ58G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.
    07/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report on a Chandra/HETG X-ray spectrum of the transient X-ray binary MAXI J1305-704. A rich absorption complex is detected in the Fe L band, including density-sensitive lines from Fe XX, XXI, and XXII. Spectral analysis over three wavelength bands with a large grid of XSTAR photoionization models generally requires a gas density of n > 1 E+17 cm^-3. Assuming a luminosity of L = 1 E+37 erg/s, fits to the 10-14 Angstrom band constrain the absorbing gas to lie within r = 3.9 +/- 0.7 E+3 km from the central engine, or about r = 520 +/- 90 (M/5 Msun) r_g, where r_g = GM/c^2. At this small distance from the compact object, gas in stable orbits should have a gravitational red-shift of z = v/c = 3 +/- 1 E-3 (M/5 Msun), and any tenuous inflowing gas should have a free-fall velocity of v/c = 6 +/- 1 E-2 (M/5 Msun)^(1/2). The best-fit single-zone photoionization models measure a red-shift of v/c = 2.6-3.2 E-3. Models with two absorbing zones provide significantly improved fits, and the additional zone is measured to have a red-shift of v/c =4.6-4.9 E-2. Thus, the observed shifts are broadly consistent with those expected at the photoionization radius. The absorption spectrum revealed in MAXI J1305-704 may be best explained in terms of a "failed wind" like those predicted in some recent numerical simulations of black hole accretion flows. The robustness of the velocity shifts was explored through detailed simulations with the Chandra/MARX ray-tracing package, and analysis of the zeroth-order ACIS-S3 spectrum. The simulations and ACIS spectrum suggest that the shifts are not instrumental; however, strong caution is warranted. We discuss our results in the context of accretion flows in stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei, and the potential role of failed winds in emerging connections between disk outflows and black hole state transitions.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2013; · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the in-situ heavy ion properties in an ICME structure, and model the ion charge composition by an existing post-CME current sheet model. We use this work to illustrate the diagnostic power of ICME ion charge composition for differentiating models of magnetic reconnection associated with CMEs.
    06/2013;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the results of wide integral-field near-infrared (1.0-1.8 um) spectroscopic observations of the southeastern shell of the young core-collapse supernova remnant (SNR) G11.2-0.3. We first construct [Fe II] 1.644 um line images of three bright clumps from the obtained spectral image cubes and compare them with those of other transitions such as [Fe II] 1.257, [Fe II] 1.534 and He I 1.083 um line images. This allows us to estimate the electron density (~ 4,700-9,400 cm^-3) and extinction (Av ~ 16-20 mag) of the shell, including detailed two-dimensional distribution of the properties in the brightest clump, as well as the discovery of a faint high-velocity (~ -440 km/s) component in the clump. Our SNR shock model calculations estimate the preshock number density of ~ 250-500 cm^-3 and shock speed of ~ 80-250 km/s in the [Fe II]-emitting region of the SNR. The comparison between the observed and modelled radial profiles of the line intensities and their ratios reveals that the shell is composed of multiple thin filaments which have been likely formed in episodic mass loss processes of a progenitor star. The discovery of the faint high-velocity component supports the interpretation that the southeastern shell of G11.2-0.3 is mainly composed of circumstellar material with contamination by supernova ejecta and also that its ejected material was expelled primarily in the southeast-northwest direction.
    The Astrophysical Journal 05/2013; 770(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
1,930.24 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1970–2014
    • Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
      • Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2013
    • Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research
      Göttingen, Lower Saxony, Germany
    • Chinese Academy of Sciences
      • Graduate School
      Peping, Beijing, China
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Department of Astronomy
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2012
    • Elmhurst College
      Elmhurst, Illinois, United States
  • 2011
    • Northeastern University
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • China University of Petroleum
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2010
    • Hiroshima University
      Hirosima, Hiroshima, Japan
    • United States Naval Observatory
      Washington, Maine, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Groningen
      • Kapteyn Astronomical Institute
      Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
    • University of Michigan
      • Department of Astronomy
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • 2004–2007
    • Idenix Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
    • Middlebury College
      • Department of Physics
      Middlebury, Indiana, United States
  • 1996–2007
    • University of Florence
      • Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia
      Florens, Tuscany, Italy
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2006
    • University of Cambridge
      • Institute of Astronomy
      Cambridge, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2003
    • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2000
    • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
      • Department Physics and Astronomy
      New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States
  • 1999
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Baltimore, MD, United States
    • University of Maryland, College Park
      • Department of Astronomy
      Maryland, United States
  • 1997
    • University of Oregon
      Eugene, Oregon, United States
    • European Space Agency
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1993
    • Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
      Livermore, California, United States
  • 1988
    • European Southern Observatory
      Arching, Bavaria, Germany