Normand Mousseau

Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

Are you Normand Mousseau?

Claim your profile

Publications (187)569.33 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. This study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.
    Physical Review B 06/2015; 91(22):224106. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.91.224106 · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a new semiempirical potential for graphene, which includes also an out-of-plane energy term. This novel potential is developed from density functional theory (DFT) calculations for small numbers of atoms and can be used for configurations with millions of atoms. Our simulations show that buckling caused by typical defects such as the Stone−Wales (SW) defect extends to hundreds of nanometers. Surprisingly, this long-range relaxation lowers the defect formation energy dramaticallyby a factor of 2 or 3implying that previously published DFT-calculated defect formation energies suffer from large systematic errors. We also show the applicability of the novel potential to other long-range defects including line dislocations and grain boundaries, all of which exhibit pronounced out-of-plane relaxations. We show that the energy as a function of dislocation separation diverges logarithmically for flat graphene but converges to a constant for freestanding buckled graphene. A potential in which the atoms are attracted to the 2D plane restores the logarithmic behavior of the energy. Future simulations employing this potential will elucidate the influence of the typical long-range buckling and rippling on the physical properties of graphene.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry C 04/2015; 119(17). DOI:10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b01905 · 4.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The properties of materials, even at the atomic level, evolve on macroscopic time scales. Following this evolution through simulation has been a challenge for many years. For lattice-based activated diffusion, kinetic Monte Carlo has turned out to be an almost perfect solution. Various accelerated molecular dynamical schemes, for their part, have allowed the study on long time scale of relatively simple systems. There is still a need, however, for methods able to handle complex materials such as alloys and disordered systems. Here, we review the kinetic Activation–Relaxation Technique (k-ART), one of a handful of off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo methods, with on-the-fly cataloging, that have been proposed in the last few years.
    Computational Materials Science 04/2015; 100, Part B:111-123. DOI:10.1016/j.commatsci.2014.11.047 · 1.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Chemical Reviews 03/2015; 115(9). DOI:10.1021/cr500638n · 45.66 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington's disease. Its first exon-more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)-is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin's activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties-order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid-of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Islet amyloid polypeptide, IAPP or amylin, is a 37-residue peptide hormone coexpressed with insulin by pancreatic β-cells. The aggregation of human IAPP (hIAPP) into amyloid deposits is associated with type II diabetes. Substantial evidence suggests that the interaction of anionic membranes with hIAPP may facilitate peptide aggregation and the N-terminal 1~19 fragment (IAPP1-19) plays an important role in peptide-membrane interaction. As a first step to understand how structural differences between human and rat IAPP peptides in membrane may influence the later oligomerization process, we have investigated the structures and orientations of hIAPP1-19 and the less toxic rIAPP1-19 (i.e. the H18R mutant of hIAPP1-19) monomers in anionic POPG bilayers by performing replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. On the basis of ~20-μs REMD simulations started from a random coil conformation of the peptide placed in water, we find that unfolded h(r)IAPP1-19 can insert into the bilayers and the membrane-bound peptide stays mainly at the lipid head-tail interface. hIAPP1-19 displays higher propensity to adopt helical conformations than rIAPP1-19, especially in the L12~L16 region. The helical conformation is oriented parallel to the bilayer surface and buried in the membrane 0.3~0.8 nm below the phosphorus atoms, consistent with previous electron paramagnetic resonance data. The helical conformation is an amphiphilic helix with its hydrophilic and hydrophobic faces pointing respectively to the lipid head and tail regions. The H18R substitution enhances the electrostatic interactions of IAPP1-19 with membrane, while weakens the intra-peptide interactions crucial for helix formation, thus leading to lower helix propensity of rIAPP1-19. Implications of our simulation results on the membrane-mediated IAPP1-19 oligomerization are discussed.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 02/2015; 119(8). DOI:10.1021/jp5111357 · 3.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vacancy diffusion and clustering processes in body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe are studied using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities. For monovacancies and divacancies, k-ART recovers previously published results while clustering in a 50-vacancy simulation box agrees with experimental estimates. Applying k-ART to the study of clustering pathways for systems containing from one to six vacancies, we find a rich set of diffusion mechanisms. In particular, we show that the path followed to reach a hexavacancy cluster influences greatly the associated mean-square displacement. Aggregation in a 50-vacancy box also shows a notable dispersion in relaxation time associated with effective barriers varying from 0.84 to 1.1 eV depending on the exact pathway selected. We isolate the effects of long-range elastic interactions between defects by comparing to simulations where those effects are deliberately suppressed. This allows us to demonstrate that in bcc Fe, suppressing long-range interactions mainly influences kinetics in the first 0.3 ms, slowing down quick energy release cascades seen more frequently in full simulations, whereas long-term behavior and final state are not significantly affected.
    Physical Review B 10/2014; 90(13):134109. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.90.134109 · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Cindie Eugene, Rozita Laghaei, Normand Mousseau
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In recent years, much effort has focused on the early stages of aggregation and the formation of amyloid oligomers. Aggregation processes for these proteins are complex and their non-equilibrium nature makes any experimental study very difficult. Under these conditions, simulations provide a useful alternative for understanding the dynamics of the early stages of oligomerization. Here, we focus on the non-Aβ amyloid component (NAC) of the monomer, dimer, and trimer of α-synuclein, an important 35-residue sequence involved in the aggregation and fibrillation of this protein associated with Parkinson's disease. Using Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations combined with the coarse grained Optimized Potential for Efficient peptide structure Prediction potential, we identify the role of the various regions and the secondary structures for the onset of oligomerization. For this sequence, we clearly observe the passage from α-helix to β-sheet, a characteristic transition of amyloid proteins. More precisely, we find that the NAC monomer is highly structured with two α-helical regions, between residues 2-13 and 19-25. As the dimer and trimer form, β-sheet structures between residues 2-14 and 26-34 appear and rapidly structure the system. The resulting conformations are much more structured than similar dimers and trimers of β-amyloid and amylin proteins and yet display a strong polymorphism at these early stages of aggregation. In addition to its inherent experimental interest, comparison with other sequences shows that NAC could be a very useful numerical model for understanding the onset of aggregation.
    The Journal of Chemical Physics 10/2014; 141(13):135103. DOI:10.1063/1.4896381 · 3.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The efficiency of minimum-energy configuration searching algorithms is closely linked to the energy landscape structure of complex systems. Here we characterize this structure by following the time evolution of two systems, vacancy aggregation in Fe and energy relaxation in ion-bombarded c-Si, using the kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method, and the well-known Bell-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) principle. We also compare the efficiency of two methods for handling non-diffusive flickering states -- an exact solution and a Tabu-like approach that blocks already visited states. Comparing these various simulations allow us to confirm that the BEP principle does not hold for complex system since forward and reverse energy barriers are completely uncorrelated. This means that following the lowest available energy barrier, even after removing the flickering states, leads to rapid trapping: relaxing complex systems requires crossing high-energy barriers in order to access new energy basins, in agreement with the recently proposed replenish-and-relax model [B\'eland et al., PRL 111, 105502 (2013)] This can be done by forcing the system through these barriers with Tabu-like methods. Interestingly, we find that following the fundamental kinetics of a system, though standard KMC approach, is at least as efficient as these brute-force methods while providing the correct kinetics information.
    Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation 07/2014; 11(4). DOI:10.1021/ct501032v · 5.31 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigate Ge mixing at the Si(001) surface and characterize the $2\times N$ Si(001) reconstruction by means of hybrid quantum and molecular mechanics calculations (QM/MM). Avoiding fake elastic dampening, this scheme allows to correctly take into account long range deformation induced by reconstruted and defective surfaces. We focus in particular on the dimer vacancy line (DVL) and its interaction with Ge adatoms. We first show that calculated formation energies for these defects are highly dependent on the choice of chemical potential and that the latter must be chosen carefully. Characterizing the effect of the DVL on the deformation field, we also find that the DVL favors Ge segregation in the fourth layer close to the DVL. Using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) and QM/MM, we show that a complex diffusion path permits the substitution of the Ge atom in the fourth layer, with barriers compatible with mixing observed at intermediate temperature.
  • Sébastien Côté, Guanghong Wei, Normand Mousseau
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The huntingtin protein is characterized by a segment of consecutive glutamines (Q$_N$) that is responsible for its fibrillation. As with other amyloid proteins, misfolding of huntingtin is related to Huntington's disease through pathways that can involve interactions with phospholipid membranes. Experimental results suggest that the N-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (htt$^{NT}$) positioned just before the Q$_N$ region is important for the binding of huntingtin to membranes. Through all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations, we unveil the structure and dynamics of the htt$^{NT}$Q$_N$ fragment on a phospholipid membrane at the atomic level. We observe that the insertion dynamics of this peptide can be described by four main steps -- approach, reorganization, anchoring and insertion -- that are very diverse at the atomic level. On the membrane, the htt$^{NT}$ peptide forms a stable $\alpha$-helix essentially parallel to the membrane with its non-polar side-chains -- mainly Leu-4, Leu-7, Phe-11 and Leu-14 -- positioned in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Salt-bridges involving Glu-5, Glu-12, Lys-6 and Lys-15, as well as hydrogen bonds involving Thr-3 and Ser-13 with the phospholipids also stabilize the structure and orientation of the htt$^{NT}$ peptide. These observations do not significantly change upon adding the Q$_N$ region whose role is rather to provide, through its hydrogen bonds with the phospholipids' head group, a stable scaffold facilitating the partitioning of the htt$^{NT}$ region in the membrane. Moreover, by staying accessible to the solvent, the amyloidogenic Q$_N$ region could also play a key role for the oligomerization of htt$^{NT}$Q$_N$ on phospholipid membranes. © Proteins 2014;. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Proteins Structure Function and Bioinformatics 07/2014; 82(7). DOI:10.1002/prot.24509 · 2.92 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The OPEP coarse-grained protein model has been applied to a wide range of applications since its first release 15 years ago. The model, which combines energetic and structural accuracy and chemical specificity, allows the study of single protein properties, DNA-RNA complexes, amyloid fibril formation and protein suspensions in a crowded environment. Here we first review the current state of the model and the most exciting applications using advanced conformational sampling methods. We then present the current limitations and a perspective on the ongoing developments.
    Chemical Society Reviews 04/2014; 43(13). DOI:10.1039/c4cs00048j · 30.43 Impact Factor
  • Laurent Karim Béland, Normand Mousseau
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Diffusion and relaxation of defects in bulk systems is a complex process that can only be accessed directly through simulations. We characterize the mechanisms of low-temperature aging in self-implanted crystalline silicon, a model system used extensively to characterize both amorphization and return to equilibrium processes, over 11 orders of magnitudes in time, from 10 ps to 1 s, using a combination of molecular dynamics and kinetic activation-relaxation technique simulations. These simulations allow us to reassess the atomistic mechanisms responsible for structural relaxations and for the overall logarithmic relaxation, a process observed in a large number of disordered systems and observed here over the whole simulation range. This allows us to identify three microscopic regimes, annihilation, aggregation, and reconstruction, in the evolution of defects and to propose atomistic justification for an analytical model of logarithmic relaxation. Furthermore, we show that growing activation barriers and configurational space exploration are kinetically limiting the system to a logarithmic relaxation. Overall, our long-time simulations do not support the amorphous cluster model but point rather to a relaxation driven by elastic interactions between defect complexes of all sizes.
    Physical Review B 12/2013; 88(21). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.88.214201 · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We study ion-damaged crystalline silicon by combining nanocalorimetric experiments with an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulation to identify the atomistic mechanisms responsible for the structural relaxation over long time scales. We relate the logarithmic relaxation, observed in a number of disordered systems, with heat-release measurements. The microscopic mechanism associated with this logarithmic relaxation can be described as a two-step replenish and relax process. As the system relaxes, it reaches deeper energy states with logarithmically growing barriers that need to be unlocked to replenish the heat-releasing events leading to lower-energy configurations.
    Physical Review Letters 09/2013; 111(10). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.105502 · 7.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The nature of structural relaxation in disordered systems such as amorphous silicon (a-Si) remains a fundamental issue in our attempts at understanding these materials. While a number of experiments suggest that mechanisms similar to those observed in crystals, such as vacancies, could dominate the relaxation, theoretical arguments point rather to the possibility of more diverse pathways. Using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique, an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog construction, we resolve this question by following 1000 independent vacancies in a well-relaxed a-Si model at 300 K over a timescale of up to one second. Less than one percent of these survive over this period of time and none diffuse more than once, showing that relaxation and diffusion mechanisms in disordered systems are fundamentally different from those in the crystal.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 04/2013; 87(14). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.87.144204 · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Fatigue and aging of materials are, in large part, determined by the evolution of the atomic-scale structure in response to strains and perturbations. This coupling between microscopic structure and long time scales remains one of the main challenges in materials study. Focusing on a model system, ion-damaged crystalline silicon, we combine nanocalorimetric experiments with an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulation to identify the atomistic mechanisms responsible for the structural relaxation over long time scales. We relate the logarithmic relaxation, observed in a number of systems, with heat-release measurements. The microscopic mechanism associated with logarithmic relaxation can be described as a two-step replenish and relax process. As the system relaxes, it reaches deeper energy states with logarithmically growing barriers that need to be unlocked to replenish the heat-releasing events leading to lower energy configurations.
  • Jean-Francois Joly, Normand Mousseau
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The contribution of vacancy-like defects to the relaxation of amorphous silicon (a-Si) has been a matter of debate for a long time. Due to their disordered nature, there is a large number local environments in which such a defect can exists. Previous numerical studies the vacancy in a-Si have been limited to small systems and very short timescales. Here we use kinectic ART (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo simulation method with on-the-fly catalog building [1,2] to study the time evolution of 1000 different single vacancy configurations in a well-relaxed a-Si model. Our results show that most of the vacancies are annihlated quickly. In fact, while 16% of the 1000 isolated vacancies survive for more than 1 ns of simulated time, 0.043% remain after 1 ms and only 6 of them survive longer than 0.1 second. Diffusion of the full vacancy is only seen in 19% of the configurations and diffusion usually leads directly to the annihilation of the defect. The actual annihilation event, in which one of the defective atoms fills the vacancy, is usually similar in all the configurations but local bonding environment heavily influence its activation barrier and relaxation energy. [4pt] [1] El-Mellouhi et al,Phys. Rev B. 78, (2008)[0pt] [2] Beland et al., Phys. Rev. E. 84, (2011)
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the last two decades, there has been a considerable interest in the development of accelerated numerical methods for sampling the energy landscape of complex materials. Many of these methods are based on the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm introduced 40 years ago. This is the case of kinetic ART, for example, which uses a very efficient transition-state searching method, ART nouveau, coupled with a topological tool, NAUTY, to offer an off-lattice KMC method with on-the-fly catalog building to study complex systems, such as ion-bombarded and amorphous materials, on timescales of a second or more. Looking at two systems, vacancy aggregation in Fe and energy relaxation in ion-bombarded c-Si, we characterize the changes in the energy landscape and the relation to its time evolution with kinetic ART and its correspondence with the well-known Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle used in chemistry.
    APS March Meeting 2013; 03/2013
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Because of the long-time scale involved, the activated diffusion of point defects is often studied in standard molecular dynamics at high temperatures only, making it more difficult to characterize complex diffusion mechanisms. Here, we turn to the study of point defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using kinetic ART (kART)[1-2], an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). By generating catalogs of diffusion mechanisms and fully incorporating elastic and off-lattice effects, kART is a unique tool for characterizing this problem. More precisely, using kART with the standard Stillinger-Weber potential we consider the evolution of crystalline cells with 1 to 4 vacancies and 1 to 4 interstitials at various temperatures and to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics in addition to identifying special configurations such as a 2-interstitial super-diffuser. [4pt] [1] F. El-Mellouhi, N. Mousseau and L.J. Lewis, Phys. Rev. B. 78, 153202 (2008)[0pt] [2] L. K. Béland, P. Brommer, F. El-Mellouhi, J.-F. Joly and N. Mousseau, Phys. Rev. E 84, 046704 (2011).
    APS March Meeting 2013; 03/2013
  • J Nasica-Labouze, N Mousseau
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of senile dementia, affecting more than 24 million people worldwide. It is characterised pathologically by abnormally high levels of neurofibrillary tangles resulting from the accumulation of tau protein in dead and dying neurons, and by elevated numbers of senile plaques in the cortex and hippocampus of the brain. The major component of senile plaques is a small protein of 39–43 amino acids called amyloid-β (Aβ). Thus far, no treatment has been shown to slow the progression of sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease. A large body of evidence points, however, to the early Aβ-formed oligomers as the primary toxic species in Alzheimer's disease. A powerful strategy for developing pharmaceutical treatments against Alzheimer's is to elucidate the pathways of oligomer formation and determine the structures of the toxic aggregates. This book provides a panoramic view across recent in vitro and in vivo studies along with state-of-the-art computer simulations, designed to increase the readers' understanding of Aβ oligomerisation and fibril formation. At the same time, the book delves into the pathogenesis of familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease at the atomic level of detail. Written by leading authors in their respective fields, this book will be valuable to all scientists working on Alzheimer's disease.
    01/2013; Imperial Press College.

Publication Stats

3k Citations
569.33 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1990–2015
    • Université de Montréal
      • Department of Physics
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2014
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      • Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée (LPTMC)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2002–2014
    • Université du Québec à Montréal
      • Department of Music
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2011
    • Fudan University
      • Department of Physics
      Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China
  • 2004–2006
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      • Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique
      Lyon, Rhone-Alpes, France
    • Optech Montréal
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2001–2006
    • Universiteit Utrecht
      • Institute for Theoretical Physics
      Utrecht, Provincie Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 1997–2002
    • Ohio University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Athens, OH, United States
  • 1996–1998
    • Delft University of Technology
      Delft, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1996–1997
    • University of Oxford
      Oxford, England, United Kingdom
  • 1992–1995
    • Michigan State University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      East Lansing, Michigan, United States