Nial R. Tanvir

University of Leicester, Leiscester, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (94)465.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We present a wide dataset of gamma-ray, X-ray, UVOIR, and radio observations of the Swift GRB100814A. At the end of the slow decline phase of the X-ray and optical afterglow, this burst shows a sudden and prominent rebrightening in the optical band only, followed by a fast decay in both bands. The optical rebrightening also shows chromatic evolution. Such a puzzling behaviour cannot be explained by a single component model. We discuss other possible interpretations, and we find that a model that incorporates a long-lived reverse shock and forward shock fits the temporal and spectral properties of GRB100814A the best.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 05/2015; 449(1):1024. DOI:10.1093/mnras/stv267 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ${\it Swift}$ J2058.4+0516 (Sw J2058+05, hereafter) has been suggested as the second member (after Sw J1644+57) of the rare class of tidal disruption events accompanied by relativistic ejecta. Here we report a multiwavelength (X-ray, ultraviolet/optical/infrared, radio) analysis of Sw J2058+05 from 3 months to 3 yr post-discovery in order to study its properties and compare its behavior with that of Sw J1644+57. Our main results are as follows. (1) The long-term X-ray light curve of Sw J2058+05 shows a remarkably similar trend to that of Sw J1644+57. After a prolonged power-law decay, the X-ray flux drops off rapidly by a factor of $\gtrsim 160$ within a span of $\Delta$$t$/$t$ $\le$ 0.95. Associating this sudden decline with the transition from super-Eddington to sub-Eddington accretion, we estimate the black hole mass to be in the range of $10^{4-6}$ M$_{\odot}$. (2) We detect rapid ($\lesssim 500$ s) X-ray variability before the dropoff, suggesting that, even at late times, the X-rays originate from close to the black hole (ruling out a forward-shock origin). (3) We confirm using ${\it HST}$ and VLBA astrometry that the location of the source coincides with the galaxy's center to within $\lesssim 400$ pc (in projection). (4) We modeled Sw J2058+05's ultraviolet/optical/infrared spectral energy distribution with a single-temperature blackbody and find that while the radius remains more or less constant at a value of $63.4 \pm 4.5$ AU ($\sim 10^{15}$ cm) at all times during the outburst, the blackbody temperature drops significantly from $\sim$ 30,000 K at early times to a value of $\sim$ 15,000 K at late times (before the X-ray dropoff). Our results strengthen Sw J2058+05's interpretation as a tidal disruption event similar to Sw J1644+57. For such systems, we suggest the rapid X-ray dropoff as a diagnostic for black hole mass.
    The Astrophysical Journal 02/2015; 805(1). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/805/1/68 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Long-duration gamma-ray bursts act as beacons to the sites of star-formation in the distant universe. GRBs reveal galaxies too faint and star-forming regions too dusty to characterize in detail using any other method, and provide a powerful independent constraint on the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate density at high-redshift. However, a full understanding of the GRB phenomenon and its relation to cosmic star-formation requires connecting the observations obtained from GRBs to the properties of the galaxies hosting them. The large majority of GRBs originate at moderate to high redshift (z>1) and Spitzer has proven crucial for understanding the host population, given its unique ability to observe the rest-frame NIR and its unrivaled sensitivity and efficiency. We propose to complete a comprehensive public legacy survey of the Swift GRB host population to build on our earlier successes and push beyond the statistical limits of previous, smaller efforts. Our survey will enable a diverse range of GRB and galaxy science including: (1) to quantitatively and robustly map the connection between GRBs and cosmic star-formation to constrain the GRB progenitor and calibrate GRB rate-based measurements of the high-z cosmic star-formation rate; (2) to constrain the luminosity function of star-forming galaxies at the faint end and at high redshift; (3) to understand how the ISM properties seen in absorption in high-redshift galaxies unveiled by GRBs - metallicity, dust column, dust properties - connect to global properties of the host galaxies such as mass and age. Building on a decade of experience at both observatories, our observations will create an enduring joint Swift-Spitzer legacy sample and provide the definitive resource with which to examine all aspects of the GRB/galaxy connection for years and possibly decades to come.
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    ABSTRACT: We have observed the host galaxy of the low redshift, low luminosity GRB 080517 at 105.8 GHz using the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer. We detect an emission line with integrated flux S.delta{nu} = 0.39 +/- 0.05 Jy km/s - consistent both spatially and in velocity with identification as the J=1-0 rotational transition of carbon monoxide (CO) at the host galaxy redshift. This represents only the third long GRB host galaxy with molecular gas detected in emission. The inferred molecular gas mass, M_H2 ~ 6.3 x 10^8 M_sun, implies a gas consumption timescale of ~40 Myr if star formation continues at its current rate. Similar short timescales appear characteristic of the long GRB population with CO observations to date, suggesting that the gamma-ray burst in these sources occurs towards the end of their star formation episode.
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    ABSTRACT: We present an analysis of the photometry and spectroscopy of the host galaxy of Swift-detected GRB 080517. From our optical spectroscopy, we identify a redshift of z = 0.089 +/- 0.003, based on strong emission lines, making this a rare example of a very local, low luminosity, long gamma ray burst. The galaxy is detected in the radio with a flux density of S(4.8GHz) =0.22 +/- 0.04mJy - one of relatively few known GRB hosts with a securely measured radio flux. Both optical emission lines and a strong detection at 22 um suggest that the host galaxy is forming stars rapidly, with an inferred star formation rate ~16 Msun/yr and a high dust obscuration (E(B-V )>1, based on sight-lines to the nebular emission regions). The presence of a companion galaxy within a projected distance of 25 kpc, and almost identical in redshift, suggests that star formation may have been triggered by galaxy-galaxy interaction. However, fitting of the remarkably flat spectral energy distribution from the ultraviolet through to the infrared suggests that an older, 500Myr post-starburst stellar population is present along with the ongoing star formation. We suggest that that the host galaxy of GRB 080517 provides a valuable local exemplar of the stellar populations producing dusty, optically-faint bursts.
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    ABSTRACT: The reionisation of the universe is thought to have ended around z~6, as inferred from spectroscopy of distant bright background sources such as quasars (QSO) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Furthermore, spectroscopy of a GRB afterglow provides insight in its host galaxy, which is often too dim and distant to study otherwise. We present the high S/N VLT/X-shooter spectrum of GRB130606A at z=5.913. We aim to measure the degree of ionisation of the IGM between 5.02<z<5.84, and to study the chemical abundance pattern and dust content of its host galaxy. We measure the flux decrement due to IGM absorption at Ly$\alpha$, $\beta$ and $\gamma$ wavelength regions. The hydrogen and metal absorption lines formed in the host galaxy are fitted with Voigt profiles to obtain column densities. Our measurements of the Ly$\alpha$-forest optical depth are consistent with previous measurements of QSOs, but have smaller uncertainty than these. The Ly$\alpha$ red-damping-wing analysis yields a neutral fraction $x_{HI}<0.03$ (3$\sigma$). We obtain column density measurements of several elements. The ionisation corrections due to the GRB is estimated to be negligible (<0.03 dex), but larger corrections may apply due to pre-existing radiation field (up to 0.3 dex based on sub-DLA studies). Our measurements confirm that the Universe is already predominantly ionised over the redshift range probed in this work, but was slightly more neutral at z>5.6. GRBs are useful probes of the IGM ionisation state of the early Universe, but because of internal scatter we need a larger statistical sample to draw robust conclusions. The high [Si/Fe] in the host can be due to dust depletion, alpha-element enhancement or a combination. The very high value of [Al/Fe]=2.40+/-0.78 might be connected to the stellar population history. We estimate the host metallicity to be -1.5<[M/H]<-1.2 (3%-6% of solar). [truncated]
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    ABSTRACT: Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the William Herschel Telescope and Nordic Optical Telescope in the nIR/optical, and with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have combined our data with the Swift X-Ray Telescope monitoring, and radio and millimeter observations from the literature to perform broadband modeling, and determined the macro- and microphysical parameters of the GRB blast wave. By combining the broadband modeling results with our nIR upper limits we have put constraints on the extinction in the host galaxy. This is consistent with the optical extinction we have derived from the excess X-ray absorption, and higher than in other dark bursts for which similar modeling work has been performed. We also present deep imaging of the host galaxy with the Keck I telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which resulted in a well-constrained photometric redshift, giving credence to the tentative spectroscopic redshift we obtained with the Keck II telescope, and estimates for the stellar mass and star formation rate of the host. Finally, our high resolution HST images of the host galaxy show that the GRB afterglow position is offset from the brightest regions of the host galaxy, in contrast to studies of optically bright GRBs.
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    ABSTRACT: We present deep VLT and HST observations of the nearest examples of calcium-rich 'gap' transients -- rapidly evolving transient events, with a luminosity intermediate between novae and supernovae. These sources are frequently found at large galactocentric offsets, and their progenitors remain mysterious. Our observations find no convincing underlying quiescent sources coincident with the locations of these transients, allowing us to rule out a number of potential progenitor systems. The presence of surviving massive-star binary companions (or other cluster members) are ruled out, providing an independent rejection of a massive star origin for these events. Dwarf satellite galaxies are disfavoured unless one invokes as yet unknown conditions that would be extremely favourable for their production in the lowest mass systems. Our limits also probe the majority of the globular cluster luminosity function, ruling out the presence of an underlying globular cluster population at high significance, and thus the possibility that they are created via dynamical interactions in dense globular cluster cores. Given the lack of underlying systems, previous progenitor suggestions have difficulty reproducing the remote locations of these transients, even when considering solely halo-borne progenitors. Our preferred scenario is that calcium-rich transients are high velocity, kicked systems, exploding at large distances from their natal site. Coupled with a long-lived progenitor system post-kick, this naturally explains the lack of association these transients have with their host stellar light, and the extreme host-offsets exhibited. Neutron star -- white dwarf mergers may be a promising progenitor system in this scenario.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 08/2014; 444(3). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stu1574 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While wide-field surveys of M31 have revealed much substructure at large radii, understanding the nature and origin of this material is not straightforward from morphology alone. Using deep HST/ACS data, we have derived further constraints in the form of quantitative star formation histories (SFHs) for 14 fields which sample diverse substructures. In agreement with our previous analysis of colour-magnitude diagram morphologies, we find the resultant behaviours can be broadly separated into two categories. The SFHs of 'disc-like' fields indicate that most of their mass has formed since z~1, with one quarter of the mass formed in the last 5 Gyr. We find 'stream-like' fields to be on average 1.5 Gyr older, with <10 percent of their stellar mass formed within the last 5 Gyr. These fields are also characterised by an age--metallicity relation showing rapid chemical enrichment to solar metallicity by z=1, suggestive of an early-type progenitor. We confirm a significant burst of star formation 2 Gyr ago, discovered in our previous work, in all the fields studied here. The presence of these young stars in our most remote fields suggests that they have not formed in situ but have been kicked-out from through disc heating in the recent past.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 06/2014; 446(3). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stu2309 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We imaged the field of GRB 140516A (Bernardini et al. GCNC 16285) with the 2.5m Nordic Optical telescope equipped with ALFOSC. The observations were carried out in the R-band on May 16.89163-16.97005 UT (0.88-2.77 hours post burst) with a total exposure time of 13x300s. We did not detect any objects brighter than R=24.5 (3 sigma Vega limit calibrated against USNO B1.0) consistent with the enhanced XRT position (Osborne et al. GCNC 16289). http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/gcn/gcn3/16290.gcn3
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    ABSTRACT: We have observed the afterglow of GRB 140515A (D'Avanzo et al., GCN 16267) with the 2.5m NOT telescope. Observations consisted of 5x300s imaging in the z-band and have an average epoch of 12.10 hr after the burst. The images reveal the optical afterglow detected by Chornock et al. (GCN 16269) and Fong et al. (GCN 16274) at a magnitude of z(AB) = 22.15+/-0.15, as compared with SDSS stars. This indicates a decay with a slope of alpha ~ -0.9 (where F_nu~t^alpha) as compared with the photometry of Fong et al. (GCN 16274). Further observations are ongoing. http://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/gcn/gcn3/16278.gcn3
  • Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 04/2014; 439(4):3587-3590. DOI:10.1093/mnras/stu201 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the afterglow of GRB 120521C. By modeling the multi-wavelength data set, we derive a photometric redshift of z ≈ 6.0, which we confirm with a low signal-to-noise ratio spectrum of the afterglow. We find that a model with a constant-density environment provides a good fit to the afterglow data, with an inferred density of n <~ 0.05 cm–3. The radio observations reveal the presence of a jet break at t jet ≈ 7 d, corresponding to a jet opening angle of θjet ≈ 3°. The beaming-corrected γ-ray and kinetic energies are E γ ≈ EK ≈ 3 × 1050 erg. We quantify the uncertainties in our results using a detailed Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, which allows us to uncover degeneracies between the physical parameters of the explosion. To compare GRB 120521C to other high-redshift bursts in a uniform manner we re-fit all available afterglow data for the two other bursts at z >~ 6 with radio detections (GRBs 050904 and 090423). We find a jet break at t jet ≈ 15 d for GRB 090423, in contrast to previous work. Based on these three events, we find that γ-ray bursts (GRBs) at z >~ 6 appear to explode in constant-density environments, and exhibit a wide range of energies and densities that span the range inferred for lower redshift bursts. On the other hand, we find a hint for narrower jets in the z >~ 6 bursts, potentially indicating a larger true event rate at these redshifts. Overall, our results indicate that long GRBs share a common progenitor population at least to z ~ 8.
    The Astrophysical Journal 01/2014; 781(1):1-. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/781/1/1 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present an analysis of the large-scale structure of the halo of the Andromeda galaxy, based on the Pan-Andromeda Archeological Survey (PAndAS), currently the most complete map of resolved stellar populations in any galactic halo. Despite copious substructure, the global halo populations follow closely power law profiles that become steeper with increasing metallicity. We divide the sample into stream-like populations and a smooth halo component. Fitting a three-dimensional halo model reveals that the most metal-poor populations ([Fe/H]<-1.7) are distributed approximately spherically (slightly prolate with ellipticity c/a=1.09+/-0.03), with only a relatively small fraction (42%) residing in discernible stream-like structures. The sphericity of the ancient smooth component strongly hints that the dark matter halo is also approximately spherical. More metal-rich populations contain higher fractions of stars in streams (86% for [Fe/H]>-0.6). The space density of the smooth metal-poor component has a global power-law slope of -3.08+/-0.07, and a non-parametric fit shows that the slope remains nearly constant from 30kpc to 300kpc. The total stellar mass in the halo at distances beyond 2 degrees is 1.1x10^10 Solar masses, while that of the smooth component is 3x10^9 Solar masses. Extrapolating into the inner galaxy, the total stellar mass of the smooth halo is plausibly 8x10^9 Solar masses. We detect a substantial metallicity gradient, which declines from [Fe/H]=-0.7 at R=30kpc to [Fe/H]=-1.5 at R=150kpc for the full sample, with the smooth halo being 0.2dex more metal poor than the full sample at each radius. While qualitatively in-line with expectations from cosmological simulations, these observations are of great importance as they provide a prototype template that such simulations must now be able to reproduce in quantitative detail.
    The Astrophysical Journal 11/2013; 780(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/780/2/128 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars, and are typically found in the distant Universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L ∼ 3 × 10(53) erg s(-1)) and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A was a unique event that reached the highest fluence observed in the γ-ray band. Here we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early Universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.
    Science 11/2013; DOI:10.1126/science.1242279 · 31.48 Impact Factor
  • Andrew Levan, Nial Tanvir
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    ABSTRACT: The discovery of a population of tidal disruption flares (stars torn apart by the tidal field of a supermassive black hole) offers new insight into accretion onto supermassive objects, high energy particle acceleration and the ubiquity of black holes in low mass galaxies. We have conducted a comprehensive observing campaign targetted at the best studied of these events (Swift J1644+57) utilzing many of the worlds premier observatories including HST, Spitzer, Swift, Chandra, XMM-Newton and others, and have mapped the outburst from start to finish. Here we request a final, short (0.4 hour) observation with Spitzer. This will allow us to subtract the host galaxy contribution from our earlier observations and ascertain the accurate late time shape of the optical/IR lightcurve. It will also provide the strongest possible constraints on the stellar and black hole mass in the host galaxy.
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the Galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile can not be found to fit all the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured for solely the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant (at just beyond the 1 sigma level) with that of the Andromeda dSphs, where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (>600pc) and low velocity dispersions (sigma_v < 5km/s) are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy. We also discuss the masses of all Local Group dSphs in the context of the 'too big to fail problem', and conclude that these are potentially reconcilable with theoretical predictions when the full scope of baryonic physics and observational uncertainties are taken into account.
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the Galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile can not be found to fit all the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured for solely the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant (at just beyond the 1 sigma level) with that of the Andromeda dSphs, where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (>600pc) and low velocity dispersions (sigma_v < 5km/s) are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy.
    The Astrophysical Journal 09/2013; 783(1). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/783/1/7 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: M31 has a giant stream of stars extending far to the south and a great deal of other tidal debris in its halo, much of which is thought to be directly associated with the southern stream. We model this structure by means of Bayesian sampling of parameter space, where each sample uses an N-body simulation of a satellite disrupting in M31's potential. We combine constraints on stellar surface densities from the Isaac Newton Telescope survey of M31 with kinematic data and photometric distances. This combination of data tightly constrains the model, indicating a stellar mass at last pericentric passage of log(M_s / Msun) = 9.5+-0.1, comparable to the LMC. Any existing remnant of the satellite is expected to lie in the NE Shelf region beside M31's disk, at velocities more negative than M31's disk in this region. This rules out the prominent satellites M32 or NGC 205 as the progenitor, but an overdensity recently discovered in M31's NE disk sits at the edge of the progenitor locations found in the model. M31's virial mass is constrained in this model to be log(M200) = 12.3+-0.1, alleviating the previous tension between observational virial mass estimates and expectations from the general galactic population and the timing argument. The techniques used in this paper, which should be more generally applicable, are a powerful method of extracting physical inferences from observational data on tidal debris structures.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 07/2013; 434(4). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stt1121 · 5.23 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
465.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2014
    • University of Leicester
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Leiscester, England, United Kingdom
  • 2013
    • The Astronomical Observatory of Brera
      Merate, Lombardy, Italy
  • 2002–2008
    • University of Hertfordshire
      • • School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics
      • • Centre for Astrophysics Research (CAR)
      Hatfield, England, United Kingdom
  • 1997–1998
    • University of Cambridge
      • Institute of Astronomy
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 1991
    • Durham University
      • Department of Physics
      Durham, England, United Kingdom