Mitsuru Mori

Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan

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Publications (6)10.84 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between symptoms and endoscopic findings in reflux esophagitis. Subjects, 8031 persons without medication for gastrointestinal disease, were briefly asked about the presence of heartburn, dysphagia, odynophagia, and acid regurgitation by associated medical staff before endoscopy for assessment of esophagitis utilizing the Los Angeles Classification. Endoscopically, 1199 (14.9%) were classified as positive reflux esophagitis, and 2223 (27.7%) had heartburn, 1522 (19.0%) had dysphagia, 493 (6.1%) had odynophagia, and 1466 (18.3%) had acid regurgitation. Multivariate analysis indicated that the symptom most related to esophagitis was heartburn (odds ratio: 2.46), although approximately 40% of subjects with grade C or D did not complain of heartburn. Regarding the other symptoms, less than 30% subjects with severe esophagitis complained of the symptoms and the odds ratio was approximately 1. These results indicate that endoscopic esophagitis was not equivalent to any reflux symptoms from which subjects suffered in their daily lives.
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences 01/2004; 48(12):2237-41. DOI:10.1023/B:DDAS.0000007857.15694.15 · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a 14-year follow-up study to analyze the hazard ratio (HR) of mortality regarding lifestyle-related factors in Saga Prefecture, Japan. The subjects included 2,170 people, who were randomly selected from men and women aged from 40 to 69 years old, and who also completed the standardized questionnaire on lifestyle in 1983. Information about death and corresponding data were obtained either by mail and/or through the city offices in 1997. We found that a lower body weight, a lower physical fitness level, not consuming a balanced diet, and cigarette smoking to be significantly elevated risks for all-causes of death in males after adjustment by age and health status. In addition, these results did not change even after excluding subjects for early death. The HR of the female subjects who quit smoking was significantly high, although it changed to insignificant after excluding subjects for early death. These results suggested that being underweight might be an index of a positive risk of death, while maintaining a higher physical fitness level, being careful to consume a more balanced diet, and non smoking all appear to be indexes of a negative risk of death. In addition, these results might also be considered good evidence for improving poor health habits in health promotion activities.
    Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine 10/2000; 5(3):90-6. DOI:10.1265/ehpm.2000.90
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    ABSTRACT: This community-based prospective study examined the effects of viral infections and lifestyle habits on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk in Japan. A baseline survey was conducted for 981 males and 2,078 females in June 1992 and evaluated hepatitis B surface antigen, second-generation hepatitis C virus antibody, and history of cigarette smoking and habitual alcohol consumption. By March 1997, 14 males and 8 females had been newly diagnosed with HCC. After controlling for gender and age by using the Cox model, the authors found that positivity for hepatitis B surface antigen (hazard ratio = 7.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.62, 32.61; p < 0.01) and positivity for high-titer hepatitis C virus antibody (hazard ratio = 40.38, 95% confidence interval: 11.71, 139.21; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with HCC risk, although a history of smoking or alcohol consumption was not significantly related to risk. There was a significant interaction on an additive scale for the risk of HCC development between high-titer hepatitis C virus antibody status and a history of smoking (p < 0.05) in spite of no significant interaction on a multiplicative scale. Although preventing the transmission of hepatitis viruses is most important for reducing the risk of HCC, intervention regarding lifestyle habits such as cigarette smoking should not go unheeded.
    American Journal of Epidemiology 02/2000; 151(2):131-9. DOI:10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a010180 · 4.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this cross-sectional study, the relationships of the physiological levels of estradiol (E2) and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) to the lipid and lipoprotein profiles were investigated in 212 apparently healthy men aged from 18 to 59 years old. These subjects were divided into tertiles according to the levels of E2 and DHEA-S, respectively. We performed one-way analysis of variance and analysis of co-variance controlling for age, body mass index, percent body fat, waist to hip ratio, maximal oxygen uptake, alcohol and cigarette consumptions as confounding factors.A lower E2 level was associated with higher concentrations of total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. A lower DHEA-S level was associated with a lower concentration of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) and a higher ratio of TC / HDLC. These correlations remained significant after adjusting for the above confounding factors. Neither free testosterone nor sex hormone-binding globulin was associated with the lipids and lipoproteins. These results suggest that higher levels of E2 and DHEA-S, at least in physiological concentrations, are related to the favorable lipid and lipoprotein levels in men.
    Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine 07/1999; 4(2):81-6. DOI:10.1007/BF02931999
  • Megumi HARA · Mitsuru MORI · Masahiro NISHIZUMI
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    ABSTRACT: death in Japan, have been suggested to be related to lifestyle. To establish a means for preventing these diseases, it is important to identify the risk factors in lifestyle for developing them. It has also been mentioned that socio-economic factors play an important role in the incidence and mortality of many diseases. Furthermore, it has been shown that, among socio-economic factors, occupation caused inequality in the rates of survival 1). Because there might be some differences in lifestyle among occupational groups, the risk factors for developing these diseases are also thought to differ according to occupation. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between some lifestyles and the risk of death from all causes in several occupational groups in Saga Prefecture. Subjects and Methods As previously reported2), personal data were obtained from a survey on lifestyle by means of the uniform questionnaire that had been conducted from October through November of 1983. Briefly, the survey was conducted on 4,010 subjects aged 20 to 69, randomly selected from all areas of Saga Prefecture in Japan. The questionnaire included inquiries regarding health status, previous diseases, management of health, habitual lifestyle, physical function based on daily living, and personality. From May through July of 1997, we conducted a follow up study by mail on 2,262 subjects (1,152 males and 1,110 females) who were 40-69 yr old in 1983. We received 1,543 returns for 762 males and 781 females, including 109 who had died. We ascertained whether 680 subjects among the other 719 subjects were alive, dead or lost to follow-up (moved away), with the help of the bureau of municipalities and the Cancer Registration office of Saga Prefecture. Altogether we found 327 deaths (14.5%) in this study. The study subjects were classified into 6 occupational groups according to the baseline data. These were white- collar workers (214 males and 84 females), engineers or semi-professional workers (135 males and 31 females),
    Journal of Occupational Health 01/1999; 41(3):137-143. DOI:10.1539/joh.41.137 · 1.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the risk factors of HCV transmission by a cross-sectional study while measuring anti-HCV antibodies in the area of high incidence of liver cancer. The second generation anti-HCV antibodies were applied to 1151 males and 2429 females. Simultaneously, potential risk factors were surveyed with a structured questionnaire. The unconditional logistic regression analysis was applied to adjust the age. The age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for anti-HCV seropositivity were significantly higher in the male subjects who had undergone blood transfusion (OR=2.65) and in those whose father had suffered from liver disease (OR=2.12). The age-adjusted odds ratios for anti-HCV seropositivity were significantly higher in the female subjects who had undergone blood transfusion (OR=1.90) or prior surgical intervention without blood transfusion (OR=1.30) and in those whose parent or sibling had suffered from liver disease (OR=1.74). As a result of the additional survey, the age-adjusted odds ratios for anti-HCV seropositivity were significantly higher in the male subjects (OR=2.46) and in the female subjects (OR=1.81) who had undergone acupuncture therapy. In conclusion, we were able to provide additional evidence of the several risk factors of HCV transmission by the survey in the high-incidence area of liver cancer.
    Hepatology Research 01/1998; 10(1):17-26. DOI:10.1016/S1386-6346(97)00104-6 · 2.22 Impact Factor