Min Li

Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China

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Publications (5)22.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The influence of gender and obesity on the abundance of human colonic Feacalibacterium prausnitzii is currently unclear. We collected fecal samples from 54 obese and 54 sex- and age-matched normal-weight Chinese adults and quantified the fecal F. prausnitzii as percentage of 16S rRNA gene copies of F. prausnitzii accounting to that of total gut bacteria with quantitative PCR. The fecal F. prausnitzii amount was not significantly different between obese and lean subjects. Men possessed significantly lower level of fecal F. prausnitzii than women, and the significant and positive correlation of fecal F. prausnitzii quantity with fasting glucose level was observed in men, not in women. Our results suggest that the gender effect, in addition to other factors including the geographic location, ethnicity, diet and gut transit times of study subjects, has to be considered when studying the relationship between gut F. prausnitzii and diseases.
    Archives of Microbiology 11/2013; · 1.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic inflammation induced by endotoxin from a dysbiotic gut microbiota contributes to the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. Modification of gut microbiota by a diet to balance its composition becomes a promising strategy to help manage obesity. A dietary scheme based on whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics (WTP diet) was designed to meet human nutritional needs as well as balance the gut microbiota. Ninety-three of 123 central obese volunteers (BMI ≥28 kg m(-2) ) completed a self-controlled clinical trial consisting of 9 weeks intervention on WTP diet followed by a 14 weeks maintenance period. The average weight loss reached 5.79±4.64 kg (6.62±4.94%), in addition to improvement of insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. Pyrosequencing of fecal samples showed that phylotypes related to endotoxin-producing opportunistic pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were reduced significantly, while those related to gut barrier-protecting bacteria of Bifidobacteriaceae increased. Gut permeability, measured as lactulose/mannitol ratio, was decreased compared to the baseline. Plasma endotoxin load as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein was also significantly reduced, with concomitant decrease of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and an increase in adiponectin. These results suggest that modulation of the gut microbiota via dietary intervention may enhance the intestinal barrier integrity, reduce circulating antigen load, and ultimately ameliorate the inflammation and metabolic phenotypes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    FEMS Microbiology Ecology 09/2013; · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bacteroides spp. represent a prominent bacterial group in human intestinal microbiota with roles in symbiosis and pathogenicity; however, the detailed composition of this group in human feces has yet to be comprehensively characterized. In this study, the molecular diversity of Bacteroides spp. in human fecal microbiota was analyzed from a seven-member, four-generation Chinese family using Bacteroides spp. group-specific 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. A total of 549 partial 16S rRNA sequences amplified by Bacteroides spp.-specific primers were classified into 52 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with a 99% sequence identity cut-off. Twenty-three OTUs, representing 83% of all clones, were related to 11 validly described Bacteroides species, dominated by Bacteroides coprocola, B. uniformis, and B. vulgatus. Most of the OTUs did not correspond to known species and represented hitherto uncharacterized bacteria. Relative to 16S rRNA gene universal libraries, the diversity of Bacteroides spp. detected by the group-specific libraries was much higher than previously described. Remarkable inter-individual differences were also observed in the composition of Bacteroides spp. in this family cohort. The comprehensive observation of molecular diversity of Bacteroides spp. provides new insights into potential contributions of various species in this group to human health and disease.
    Systematic and Applied Microbiology 06/2009; 32(3):193-200. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Humans have evolved intimate symbiotic relationships with a consortium of gut microbes (microbiome) and individual variations in the microbiome influence host health, may be implicated in disease etiology, and affect drug metabolism, toxicity, and efficacy. However, the molecular basis of these microbe-host interactions and the roles of individual bacterial species are obscure. We now demonstrate a"transgenomic" approach to link gut microbiome and metabolic phenotype (metabotype) variation. We have used a combination of spectroscopic, microbiomic, and multivariate statistical tools to analyze fecal and urinary samples from seven Chinese individuals (sampled twice) and to model the microbial-host metabolic connectivities. At the species level, we found structural differences in the Chinese family gut microbiomes and those reported for American volunteers, which is consistent with population microbial cometabolic differences reported in epidemiological studies. We also introduce the concept of functional metagenomics, defined as "the characterization of key functional members of the microbiome that most influence host metabolism and hence health." For example, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii population variation is associated with modulation of eight urinary metabolites of diverse structure, indicating that this species is a highly functionally active member of the microbiome, influencing numerous host pathways. Other species were identified showing different and varied metabolic interactions. Our approach for understanding the dynamic basis of host-microbiome symbiosis provides a foundation for the development of functional metagenomics as a probe of systemic effects of drugs and diet that are of relevance to personal and public health care solutions.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 03/2008; 105(6):2117-22. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A group-specific PCR-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was developed and combined with group-specific clone library analysis to investigate the diversity of the Clostridium leptum subgroup in human feces. PCR products (length, 239 bp) were amplified using C. leptum cluster-specific primers and were well separated by DGGE. The DGGE patterns of fecal amplicons from 11 human individuals revealed host-specific profiles; the patterns for fecal samples collected from a child for 3 years demonstrated the structural succession of the population in the first 2 years and its stability in the third year. A clone library was constructed with 100 clones consisting of 1,143-bp inserts of 16S rRNA gene fragments that were amplified from one adult fecal DNA with one forward universal bacterial primer and one reverse group-specific primer. Eighty-six of the clones produced the 239-bp C. leptum cluster-specific amplicons, and the remaining 14 clones did not produce these amplicons but still phylogenetically belong to the subgroup. Sixty-four percent of the clones were related to Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (similarity, 97 to 99%), 6% were related to Subdoligranulum variabile (similarity, approximately 99%), 2% were related to butyrate-producing bacterium A2-207 (similarity, 99%), and 28% were not identified at the species level. The identities of most bands in the DGGE profiles for the same adult were determined by comigration analysis with the 86 clones that harbored the 239-bp group-specific fragments. Our results suggest that DGGE combined with clone library analysis is an effective technique for monitoring and analyzing the composition of this important population in the human gut flora.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 09/2006; 72(8):5232-8. · 3.95 Impact Factor