Morton B Brown

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

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Publications (128)532.18 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective To model morphological assessments of embryo quality that are predictive of live birth. Design Longitudinal cohort using cycles reported in the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS) between 2007 and 2011. Setting Clinic-based data. Patient(s) Fresh autologous assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles with ETs on day 3 or day 5 and morphological assessments reported (25,409 cycles with one embryo transferred and 96,093 cycles with two embryos transferred). Live-birth rates were modeled by morphological assessments using backward-stepping logistic regression for cycle 1 and over five cycles, separately for day 3 and day 5 transfers and number of embryos transferred (1 or 2). Additional models for each day of transfer also included the number of oocytes retrieved and the number of embryos cryopreserved. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Live births. Result(s) Morphological assessments of grade, stage, fragmentation, and symmetry were significant for the day 3 models; grade, stage, and trophectoderm were significant in the day 5 model; inner-cell mass was significant in the models when two embryos were transferred. Number of oocytes retrieved and number of embryos cryopreserved were significant for both day 3 and day 5 models. Conclusion(s) These findings confirm the significant association between embryo quality parameters reported to SART CORS and live-birth rate after ART.
    Fertility and Sterility 09/2014; · 4.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop a model predictive of live-birth rates (LBR) and multiple birth rates (MBR) for an individual considering assisted reproduction technology (ART) using linked cycles from Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) for 2004-2011.
    Fertility and sterility. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate factors associated with monozygosity (MZ) (number of fetal heartbeats on early ultrasound greater than the number of embryos transferred) and the risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies using a national assisted reproduction database. Historical cohort study. Clinic-based data. 197,327 pregnancies (including 2,824 with evidence of MZ) from cycles reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System (SART CORS) between 2004 and 2010. None. Evidence of MZ, adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals computed from logistic regression models. In the univariate analysis, the risk of MZ was increased with ovulation disorders, donor oocytes, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) suppression, assisted hatching (AZH), and day 5-6 transfer, and was decreased with higher follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) doses (≥3,000 IU). In the multivariate analysis, the risk of MZ was increased with GnRH-a suppression, AZH, and decreased with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and higher FSH dose. The interaction showed that although MZ was more likely with day 5-6 embryos, AZH had a minimal nonsignificant effect, whereas in day 2-3 embryos, AZH had a substantial statistically significant effect. Only one woman had a recurrence of MZ in a subsequent assisted reproduction pregnancy, which is consistent with randomness. The risk of MZ was higher with fresh day 5-6 embryos, donor oocytes, GnRH-a suppression, lower FSH doses, and AZH (particularly with day 2-3 embryos).
    Fertility and sterility 01/2014; · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined mealtime behaviors in families of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) on intensive insulin therapy. Behaviors were compared to published data for children on conventional therapy and examined for correlations with glycemic control. Thirty-nine families participated and had at least three home meals videotaped while children wore a continuous glucose monitor. Videotaped meals were coded for parent, child, and child eating behaviors using a valid coding system. A group difference was found for child request for food only. There were also associations found between children's glycemic control and child play and away. However, no associations were found between parent and child behaviors within meals and children's corresponding post-prandial glycemic control. Results reinforce existing research indicating that mealtime behavior problems exist for families of young children even in the context of intensive therapy and that some child behaviors may relate to glycemic control.
    Eating behaviors 12/2013; 14(4):464-7.
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    ABSTRACT: This study uses linked cycles of assisted reproductive technology (ART) to examine cumulative live birth rates, birthweight, and length of gestation by diagnostic category. We studied 145,660 women with 235,985 ART cycles reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System during 2004-2010. ART cycles were linked to individual women by name, date of birth, social security number, partner's name, and sequence of ART treatments. The study population included the first four autologous oocyte cycles for women with a single diagnosis of male factor, endometriosis, ovulation disorders, diminished ovarian reserve, or unexplained infertility. Live birth rates were calculated per cycle, per cycle number (1-4), and cumulatively. Birthweight and length of gestation were calculated for singleton births. Within each diagnosis, live birth rates were highest in the first cycle and declined with successive cycles. Women with diminished ovarian reserve had the lowest live birth rate (cumulative rate of 28.3 %); the live birth rate for the other diagnoses were very similar (cumulative rates from 62.1 % to 65.7 %). Singleton birthweights and lengths of gestation did not differ substantially across diagnoses, ranging from 3,112 to 3,286 g and 265 to 270 days, respectively. These outcomes were comparable with national averages for singleton births in the United States (3,296 g and 271 days). Women with the diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve had substantially lower live birth rates. However, singleton birthweights and lengths of gestation outcomes were similar across all other diagnoses.
    Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics 09/2013; · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of a prior assisted reproductive technology (ART) live birth on subsequent live-birth rates. Historical cohort study. Clinic-based data. The study population included 297,635 women with 549,278 cycles from 2004 to 2010 from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System. Try 1 refers to ART cycles up to and including the first live birth, try 2 to ART cycles after a first live birth. None. Live-birth rates by cycle number, try number, and oocyte source. Younger women at try 1 are more likely to return for try 2. Women returning for try 2 were more likely to have had an ART singleton versus multiple birth (33.2% after a try 1 singleton versus 8.1% after twins and 4.9% after triplets) and were less likely to have a diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve or tubal factors. Live-birth rates were significantly higher for try 2 compared with try 1 for autologous fresh cycles, averaging 7.7 percentage points higher over five cycles. Live-birth rates were not significantly different for try 2 versus try 1 with thawed autologous cycles or either fresh or thawed donor cycles. These results indicate that when fresh autologous oocytes can be used, live-birth rates per cycle are significantly greater after a prior history of an ART live birth.
    Fertility and sterility 08/2013; · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To estimate the direct medical costs associated with type 2 diabetes, its complications, and its comorbidities among US managed carepatients. Study Design: Data were from patient surveys, chart reviews, and health insurance claims for 7109 people with type 2 diabetes from 8 health plans participating in the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) study between 1999 and 2002. Methods: A generalized linear regression model was developed to estimate the association of patients' demographic characteristics, tobaccouse status, treatments, related complications, andcomorbidities with medical costs. Results: The mean annualized direct medical cost was $2465 for a white man with type 2 diabetes who had been diagnosed fewer than 15 yearsearlier, was treated with oral medication or dietalone, and had no complications or comorbidities. We found annualized medical costs to be 10% to 50% higher for women and for patients whose diabetes had been diagnosed 15 or moreyears earlier, who used tobacco, who were being treated with insulin, or who had several other complications. Coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, hemiplegia, and amputation were each associated with 70% to 150% higher costs. Costs were approximately 300% higher for end-stage renal disease treated with dialysis and approximately 500% higher for end-stage renal disease with kidney transplantation. Conclusions: Most medical costs incurred by patients with type 2 diabetes are related to complications and comorbidities. Our cost estimatescan help when determining the most cost-effectiveinterventions to prevent complications and comorbidities.
    The American journal of managed care 05/2013; 19(5):421-30. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: We report the 10-year effectiveness and within-trial cost-effectiveness of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and its Outcomes Study (DPPOS) interventions among participants who were adherent to the interventions. Study Design: DPP was a 3-year randomized clinical trial followed by 7 years of open-label modified intervention follow-up. Methods: Data on resource utilization, cost, and quality of life were collected prospectively. Economic analyses were performed from health system and societal perspectives. Lifestyle adherence was defined as achieving and maintaining a 5% reduction in initial body weight, and metformin adherence as taking metformin at 80% of study visits. Results: The relative risk reduction was 49.4% among adherent lifestyle participants and 20.8% among adherent metformin participants compared with placebo. Over 10 years, the cumulative, undiscounted, per capita direct medical costs of the interventions, as implemented during the DPP, were greater for adherent lifestyle participants ($4810) than adherent metformin participants ($2934) or placebo ($768). Over 10 years, the cumulative, per capita non-interventionrelated direct medical costs were $4250 greater for placebo participants compared with adherent lifestyle participants and $3251 greater compared with adherent metformin participants. The cumulative quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) accrued over 10 years were greater for lifestyle (6.80) than metformin (6.74) or placebo (6.67). Without discounting, from a modified societal perspective (excluding participant time) and a full societal perspective (including participant time), lifestyle cost < $5000 per QALY-gained and metformin was cost saving compared with placebo. Conclusions: Over 10 years, lifestyle intervention and metformin were cost-effective or cost saving compared with placebo. These analyses confirm that lifestyle and metformin represent a good value for money.
    The American journal of managed care 03/2013; 19(3):194-202. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate the effect of a prior assisted reproductive technology (ART) live birth on subsequent live-birth rates. Design Historical cohort study. Setting Clinic-based data. Patient(s) The study population included 297,635 women with 549,278 cycles from 2004 to 2010 from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System. Try 1 refers to ART cycles up to and including the first live birth, try 2 to ART cycles after a first live birth. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Live-birth rates by cycle number, try number, and oocyte source. Result(s) Younger women at try 1 are more likely to return for try 2. Women returning for try 2 were more likely to have had an ART singleton versus multiple birth (33.2% after a try 1 singleton versus 8.1% after twins and 4.9% after triplets) and were less likely to have a diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve or tubal factors. Live-birth rates were significantly higher for try 2 compared with try 1 for autologous fresh cycles, averaging 7.7 percentage points higher over five cycles. Live-birth rates were not significantly different for try 2 versus try 1 with thawed autologous cycles or either fresh or thawed donor cycles. Conclusion(s) These results indicate that when fresh autologous oocytes can be used, live-birth rates per cycle are significantly greater after a prior history of an ART live birth.
    Fertility and Sterility. 01/2013; 100(6):1580–1584.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE To estimate the health utility scores associated with type 2 diabetes, its treatments, complications, and comorbidities. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We analyzed health-related quality-of-life data, collected at baseline during Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes, a multicenter, prospective, observational study of diabetes care in managed care, for 7,327 individuals with type 2 diabetes. We measured quality-of-life using the EuroQol (EQ)-5D, a standardized instrument for which 1.00 indicates perfect health. We used multivariable regression to estimate the independent impact of demographic characteristics, diabetes treatments, complications, and comorbidities on health-related quality-of-life. RESULTS The mean EQ-5D-derived health utility score for those individuals with diabetes was 0.80. The modeled utility score for a nonobese, non-insulin-treated, non-Asian, non-Hispanic man with type 2 diabetes, with an annual household income of more than $40,000, and with no diabetes complications, risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or comorbidities, was 0.92. Being a woman, being obese, smoking, and having a lower household income were associated with lower utility scores. Arranging complications from least to most severe according to the reduction in health utility scores resulted in the following order: peripheral vascular disease, other heart diseases, transient ischemic attack, cerebral vascular accident, nonpainful diabetic neuropathy, congestive heart failure, dialysis, hemiplegia, painful neuropathy, and amputation. CONCLUSIONS Major diabetes complications and comorbidities are associated with decreased health-related quality-of-life. Utility estimates from our study can be used to assess the impact of diabetes on quality-of-life and conduct cost-utility analyses.
    Diabetes care 07/2012; 35(11):2250-6. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Live-birth rates after treatment with assisted reproductive technology have traditionally been reported on a per-cycle basis. For women receiving continued treatment, cumulative success rates are a more important measure. We linked data from cycles of assisted reproductive technology in the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System database for the period from 2004 through 2009 to individual women in order to estimate cumulative live-birth rates. Conservative estimates assumed that women who did not return for treatment would not have a live birth; optimal estimates assumed that these women would have live-birth rates similar to those for women continuing treatment. The data were from 246,740 women, with 471,208 cycles and 140,859 live births. Live-birth rates declined with increasing maternal age and increasing cycle number with autologous, but not donor, oocytes. By the third cycle, the conservative and optimal estimates of live-birth rates with autologous oocytes had declined from 63.3% and 74.6%, respectively, for women younger than 31 years of age to 18.6% and 27.8% for those 41 or 42 years of age and to 6.6% and 11.3% for those 43 years of age or older. When donor oocytes were used, the rates were higher than 60% and 80%, respectively, for all ages. Rates were higher with blastocyst embryos (day of transfer, 5 or 6) than with cleavage embryos (day of transfer, 2 or 3). At the third cycle, the conservative and optimal estimates of cumulative live-birth rates were, respectively, 42.7% and 65.3% for transfer of cleavage embryos and 52.4% and 80.7% for transfer of blastocyst embryos when fresh autologous oocytes were used. Our results indicate that live-birth rates approaching natural fecundity can be achieved by means of assisted reproductive technology when there are favorable patient and embryo characteristics. Live-birth rates among older women are lower than those among younger women when autologous oocytes are used but are similar to the rates among young women when donor oocytes are used. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.).
    New England Journal of Medicine 06/2012; 366(26):2483-91. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite recent advances in critical care and ventilator management, acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor may be beneficial for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. To determine whether intravenous infusion of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor would improve clinical outcomes for patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor vs. placebo. The primary outcome was days alive and breathing without mechanical ventilatory support within the first 28 days after randomization. Secondary outcomes included mortality and organ failure-free days. Medical and surgical intensive care units at three academic medical centers. One hundred thirty individuals with acute lung injury of at least 3 days duration were enrolled, out of a planned cohort of 200 subjects. Patients were randomized to receive human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (64 subjects, 250 μg/M) or placebo (66 subjects) by intravenous infusion daily for 14 days. Patients received mechanical ventilation using a lung-protective protocol. There was no difference in ventilator-free days between groups (10.7 ± 10.3 days placebo vs. 10.8 ± 10.5 days granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, p = .82). Differences in 28-day mortality (23% in placebo vs. 17% in patients receiving granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (p = .31) and organ failure-free days (12.8 ± 11.3 days placebo vs. 15.7 ± 11.9 days granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, p = .16) were not statistically significant. There were similar numbers of serious adverse events in each group. In a randomized phase II trial, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor treatment did not increase the number of ventilator-free days in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. A larger trial would be required to determine whether treatment with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor might alter important clinical outcomes, such as mortality or multiorgan failure. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00201409 [ClinicalTrials.gov]).
    Critical care medicine 09/2011; 40(1):90-7. · 6.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the long-term impact of a 24-month, empowerment-based diabetes self-management support (DSMS) intervention on sustaining health-gains achieved from previous diabetes self-management education (DSME). Prior to the intervention, all participants received 6 months of mailed DSME consisting of weekly educational newsletters coupled with clinical feedback. The intervention consisted of 88 weekly group-based sessions that participants were encouraged to attend as frequently as they needed. Sessions were guided by participants' self-management questions and also emphasized experiential learning, coping, goal-setting, and problem-solving. Baseline, 6-month, and 30-month assessments measured A1C, weight, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipids, self-care behaviors, and QOL. This report is based on 60 African-American adults with type 2 diabetes (n=89 recruited at baseline) who completed the study. Post 6-month DSME, participants demonstrated significant improvements for diastolic BP (p<0.05), serum cholesterol (p<0.001), healthy diet (p<0.01), blood glucose monitoring (p<0.05) and foot exams (p<0.01). Post 24-month intervention, participants sustained the improvements achieved from the 6-month DSME and reported additional improvements for healthy diet (p<0.05), carbohydrate spacing (p<0.01), insulin use (p<0.05), and quality of life (p<0.05). Findings suggest that an empowerment-based DSMS model can sustain or improve diabetes-related health gains achieved from previous short-term DSME.
    Diabetes research and clinical practice 08/2011; 95(1):85-92. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of increasing female obesity on response to and outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. Historical cohort study. Clinic-based data. A total of 152,500 ART cycle starts from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinical Outcomes Reporting System for 2007-2008, limited to women with documented height and grouped by body mass index (BMI, [weight/height(2)]). None. Cycle cancellation overall, cycle cancellation due to low response, treatment failure (not pregnant vs. pregnant), and pregnancy failure (fetal loss or stillbirth vs. live birth), as adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, with cycles among normal-weight women as the reference group. Cycle cancellation overall and cancellation due to low response using autologous oocytes significantly paralleled increasing BMI. The odds of treatment failure rose significantly with autologous-fresh cycles, from 1.03 for cycles among overweight women (BMI 25.0-29.9) to 1.53 for cycles among women with BMIs ≥ 50.0 kg/m(2). Likewise, the odds of pregnancy failure were most significant with increasing BMI among women with autologous-fresh cycles, increasing from 1.10 for cycles to overweight women to 2.29 for cycles to women with BMI ≥ 50.0 kg/m(2). These results indicate significantly higher odds of cycle cancellation. In addition, treatment and pregnancy failures with increasing obesity significantly increased starting with overweight women.
    Fertility and sterility 08/2011; 96(4):820-5. · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs) are inclusions found in hepatocytes of patients with chronic liver diseases. Their clinical significance and prognostic value are not understood. We performed cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) enrolled in the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial to identify clinical features associated with MDBs and changes in MDBs over time. Biopsy specimens were obtained at baseline and 1.5 and 3.5 years after patients were assigned to groups for the HALT-C trial; and patients were followed up to assess clinical and histologic outcomes. Of biopsy samples collected from 1050 patients, MDBs were present in 15%. They were associated with insulin resistance and laboratory and histologic markers of advanced liver disease (higher levels of periportal fibrosis, pericellular fibrosis, steatosis, and inflammation). After adjusting for disease severity (the ratio of aspartate aminotransferase to alanine aminotransferase, albumin, platelets, fibrosis, steatosis), the presence of MDBs was associated with histologic progression (odds ratio, 1.97; P = .04). Of the 844 patients from whom serial biopsy samples were collected, 61 (7.2%) developed MDBs (MDB gain) and 101 (12.0%) lost MDBs (MDB loss). The presence or absence of diabetes mellitus was associated with MDB gain (P = .006) or loss (P = .024), respectively. Development of MDBs was associated with decompensation (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.81; P < .001) and histologic signs of progression (adjusted odds ratio, 4.02; P = .004). The presence of MDBs in liver biopsy samples from patients with CHC is associated independently with fibrosis progression. Gain of MDBs over time is associated with decompensation and progression to cirrhosis; and occurs most frequently among diabetic patients. MDBs might be used as prognostic factors for patients with CHC.
    Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology: the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association 07/2011; 9(10):902-909.e1. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the inter- and intra-operator reliability of segmentations of female pelvic floor structures. Three segmentation specialists were asked to segment out the female pelvic structures in 20 MR datasets on three separate occasions. The STAPLE algorithm was used to compute inter- and intra-segmenter agreement of each organ in each dataset. STAPLE computed the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values (PPV) for inter- and intra-segmenter repeatability. These parameters were analyzed using intra-class correlation analysis. Correlation of organ volume to PPV and sensitivity was also computed. Mean PPV of the segmented organs ranged from 0.82 to 0.99, and sensitivity ranged from 33 to 96%. Intra-class correlation ranged from 0.07 to 0.98 across segmenters. Pearson correlation of volume to sensitivity were significant across organs, ranging from 0.54 to 0.91. Organs with significant correlation of PPV to volume were bladder (-0.69), levator ani (-0.68), and coccyx (-0.63). Undirected manual segmentation of the pelvic floor organs are adequate for locating the organs, but poor at defining structural boundaries.
    Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 03/2011; 33(3):684-91. · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether the first cycle of assisted reproductive technology (ART) predicts treatment course and outcome. Retrospective study of linked cycles. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System database. A total of 6,352 ART patients residing or treated in Massachusetts with first treatment cycle in 2004-2005 using fresh, autologous oocytes and no prior ART. Women were categorized by first cycle as follows: Group I, no retrieval; Group II, retrieval, no transfer; Group III, transfer, no embryo cryopreservation; Group IV, transfer plus cryopreservation; and Group V, all embryos cryopreserved. None. Cumulative live-birth delivery per woman, use of donor eggs, intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), or frozen embryo transfers (FET). Groups differed in age, baseline FSH level, prior gravidity, diagnosis, and failure to return for Cycle 2. Live-birth delivery per woman for groups I through V for women with no delivery in Cycle I were 32.1%, 35.9%, 40.1%, 53.4%, and 51.3%, respectively. Groups I and II were more likely to subsequently use donor eggs (14.5% and 10.9%). Group II had the highest use of ICSI (73.3%); Group III had the lowest use of FET (8.9%). Course of treatment in the first ART cycle is related to different cumulative live-birth delivery rates and eventual use of donor egg, ICSI, and FET.
    Fertility and sterility 02/2011; 95(2):600-5. · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of maternal race and ethnicity within body mass index (BMI) categories on assisted reproduction technology (ART) pregnancy and live birth rates. Historical cohort study. Clinic-based data. 31,672 ART embryo transfers from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcomes Reporting System for 2007, limited to women with documented race, ethnicity, height, and weight, with women grouped as white, Asian, Hispanic, or black and by BMI. None. Failure to achieve a clinical intrauterine gestation and failure to achieve a live birth as adjusted odds ratios within BMI categories overall with normal-weight women as the reference group, and by race and ethnicity with white women as the reference group. Failure to achieve a clinical intrauterine gestation was significantly more likely among obese women overall (1.22), normal-weight and obese Asian women (1.36 and 1.73, respectively), normal-weight Hispanic women (1.21), and overweight and obese black women (1.34 and 1.47, respectively). Among women who did conceive, failure to achieve a live birth was significantly more likely among overweight and obese women overall (1.16 and 1.27, respectively), overweight and obese Asian women (1.56 and 2.20, respectively) and Hispanic women (1.57 and 1.76, respectively), and normal-weight and obese black women (1.45 and 1.84, respectively). These findings indicate significant disparities in pregnancy and live birth rates by race and ethnicity, even within BMI categories.
    Fertility and sterility 01/2011; 95(5):1661-6. · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have recently shown the feasibility of a community-based, culturally-specific, Diabetes Prevention Program-adapted, goal-oriented group lifestyle intervention targeting weight loss in Arab Americans. The objective of this study was to examine factors associated with weight-loss goal attainment at 24-weeks of the lifestyle intervention. We assessed the relationship among demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral measures and the attainment of > or =7% decrease of initial body weight among 71 lifestyle intervention participants. Weight loss goal of > or = 7% of body weight was achieved by 44% of study participants. Demographic and psychosocial factors were not associated with weight loss. Individuals attaining the weight loss goal were more likely to have family support during the core curriculum sessions (70% vs 30%; P=.0023). Decrease in body weight was positively correlated with attendance at sessions (r=.46; P=.0016) and physical activity minutes (r=.66; P<.0001) and negatively correlated with reported caloric intake (r=-.49; P=.0023), fat intake (r=-.52; P=.0010), and saturated fat intake (r=-.39; P=.0175) in women; these trends were similar but not significant in men. Family support was an important predictor of attainment of the weight loss goal. Family-centered lifestyle interventions are likely to succeed in curtailing the rising epidemic of diabetes in the Arab-American Community.
    Ethnicity & disease 01/2011; 21(4):480-4. · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A number of observational studies and a few small or open randomized clinical trials suggest that the American cranberry may decrease incidence of recurring urinary tract infection (UTI). We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the effects of cranberry on risk of recurring UTI among 319 college women presenting with an acute UTI. Participants were followed up until a second UTI or for 6 months, whichever came first. A UTI was defined on the basis of the combination of symptoms and a urine culture positive for a known uropathogen. The study was designed to detect a 2-fold difference between treated and placebo groups, as was detected in unblinded trials. We assumed 30% of participants would experience a UTI during the follow-up period. Overall, the recurrence rate was 16.9% (95% confidence interval, 12.8%-21.0%), and the distribution of the recurrences was similar between study groups, with the active cranberry group presenting a slightly higher recurrence rate (20.0% vs 14.0%). The presence of urinary symptoms at 3 days, 1-2 weeks, and at ≥ 1 month was similar between study groups, with overall no marked differences. CONCLUSIONS.: Among otherwise healthy college women with an acute UTI, those drinking 8 oz of 27% cranberry juice twice daily did not experience a decrease in the 6-month incidence of a second UTI, compared with those drinking a placebo.
    Clinical Infectious Diseases 01/2011; 52(1):23-30. · 9.37 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
532.18 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1983–2014
    • University of Michigan
      • • Department of Biostatistics
      • • School of Public Health
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • 2013
    • George Washington University
      • Biostatistics Center
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
  • 2012–2013
    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      • Division of Diabetes Translation
      Atlanta, MI, United States
  • 2009–2013
    • Michigan State University
      • Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology
      East Lansing, MI, United States
    • Tampa General Hospital
      Tampa, Florida, United States
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences
      San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 2009–2011
    • Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center
      Lebanon, New Hampshire, United States
  • 2003–2011
    • Wayne State University
      • Department of Pharmacy Practice
      Detroit, MI, United States
  • 2008
    • Loyola University Chicago
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Chicago, IL, United States
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Durham, NC, United States
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • Department of Biostatistics
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
    • University of Colorado
      • Department of Biostatistics and Informatics
      Denver, CO, United States
  • 2007–2008
    • University of Miami
      • School of Nursing and Health Studies
      Coral Gables, FL, United States
    • University of Iowa
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Iowa City, IA, United States
    • Baylor College of Medicine
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Houston, TX, United States
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Gynecology & Obstetrics
      Baltimore, MD, United States
  • 2006–2007
    • Loyola University Medical Center
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Maywood, Illinois, United States
    • Duquesne University
      • Department of Physical Therapy
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Department of Biostatistics
      Birmingham, AL, United States
    • Oakland University
      • School of Nursing
      Rochester, MI, United States
  • 2004–2005
    • Concordia University–Ann Arbor
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    • University of California, Santa Barbara
      • Department of Statistics and Applied Probability
      Santa Barbara, CA, United States
  • 2001
    • University of Pennsylvania
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2000
    • California University of Pennsylvania
      California, Pennsylvania, United States