M Nojima

Tokyo Dental College, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (7)11.72 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gender-related risk factors in the survival of transplanted teeth with complete root formation have not yet been identified. The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in tooth autotransplantation at dental clinics. We asked participating dentists to provide information on transplantations they had undertaken from 1 January 1990 to 1931 December 2010. The data were screened to exclude patients who underwent more than one transplantation, smokers or those whose smoking habits were unknown, patients under 30 or who were 70 years old and over, cases where the transplanted teeth had incomplete root formation or multiple roots and those with fewer than 20 present teeth post-operation. We analysed 73 teeth of 73 males (mean age, 47·2 years) and 106 teeth of 106 females (mean age, 45·3 years) in this study. The cumulative survival rate and mean survival time were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The cumulative survival rate for males was 88·3% at the 5-year mark, 64·8% at 10 years and 48·6% at 15 years; for females, it was 97·2% at the 5-year mark, 85·9% at 10 years and 85·9% at 15 years. A log-rank test indicated the difference between males and females to be significant (P = 0·011). There was also a significant difference in the main causes for the loss of transplanted teeth: males lost more transplanted teeth due to attachment loss than females (P < 0·05). These results indicate that males require more attention during the autotransplantation process, particularly at the stage of pre-operation evaluation and that of follow-up maintenance.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 02/2013; · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to analyze the survival rate in autotransplanted premolars with complete root formation in dental clinics. Participating dentists were requested to provide information on transplantations they had undertaken between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2010. Data on a total of 708 teeth from 637 patients were collected. Data for other tooth types and for teeth with incomplete root formation were eliminated. In this study, data on 40 teeth in 35 patients were analyzed. Participants consisted of 17 men and 18 women ranging from 24 to 79 years in age (mean age, 43.7 years). The cumulative survival rate was 100% at the 5-year mark and 72.7% at 10 years, as calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Single-factor analysis revealed that "transplanted to the molar regions" was a significant risk factor (p<0.05) influencing the survival of transplanted teeth. However, a Cox regression analysis showed no significance. The results of this study suggest that, in cases where there is a suitable donor tooth and the oral condition is good, premolar autotransplantation is a viable treatment option, even when there is complete root formation in the donor teeth.
    The Bulletin of Tokyo Dental College 01/2013; 54(1):27-35.
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    ABSTRACT: The main reasons for loss of autotransplanted teeth are different from those involved in natural teeth loss. The aim of this study was to investigate which procedures were employed to treat spaces vacated when autotransplanted teeth were lost. Participating dentists were requested to provide information on transplantations they had undertaken. A total of 614 teeth in 552 patients (37 dentists) ranging in age from 17 to 79 years (mean age: 44.1 years) were examined. A total of 102 transplanted teeth were lost during the observation period. Procedures for treatment of spaces vacated were not influenced by main reason for transplanted tooth loss. The procedure used to treat depended on the original prosthodontic treatment of the transplanted teeth. For single crowns, the spaces were left empty (33.9%) or replaced by bridge work (30.5%), implants (20.3%), or dentures (10.2%). For single crowns in the upper and lower second molar regions, the spaces were usually left empty (upper 100%, lower 71.4%), while for those in the upper and lower first molar regions, the spaces were often replaced by bridge work (upper 41.7%, lower 50.0%). For bridge abutments, spaces were replaced by dentures (42.9%), implants (33.3%), or left empty (14.3%), and in the lower second molar region, they were mostly replaced by implants (5 cases, 41.7%). For most denture abutment cases, the spaces were replaced by dentures (88.9%). During the survival period of the transplanted teeth, the masticatory burden on the other teeth is reduced and the adjacent teeth are supported by the transplanted tooth. Even if transplanted teeth are eventually lost, traditional procedures can be performed to fill the vacated space.
    The Bulletin of Tokyo Dental College 01/2013; 54(1):37-44.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate risk factors with age in the long-term prognosis of autotransplantation of teeth with complete root formation at dental clinics. Participating dentists were asked to provide information on transplantations they had undertaken from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2010. Data on a total of 708 teeth from 637 patients were collected. The data were screened to exclude patients who were under 25 or 70 years of age and over, those who were smokers or whose smoking habits were unknown, those whose transplanted teeth had incomplete root formation or multiple roots and those with fewer than 25 present teeth post-operation. The participants in this study were 71 men (74 teeth) and 100 women (107 teeth) ranging from 25 to 69 years of age. Third molars were used as donor teeth in 89·0% of the cases. The participants were divided into three age groups of 25-39, 40-54 and 55-69. Survival analysis was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method, and a log-rank test revealed that there were no significant differences in age groups for men or women. Cox regression analysis indicated that the survival of transplanted teeth was not influenced by age. However, although not statistically significant, the clinical success rate was lower in the 55-69-year-old group than that in the younger groups. These results indicate that if suitable donor teeth are available and the conditions are right, autotransplantation is a viable treatment for missing teeth regardless of the age of the patient.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 11/2012; · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to compare the prognosis of separated and non-separated tooth autotransplantation of the upper first and second molars with complete root formation undertaken at dental clinics. The participating dentists were requested to provide information on transplantations they had undertaken from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2010. Data on a total of 708 teeth from 637 patients were collected. This study analysed 35 separated teeth and 22 non-separated teeth of 47 participants ranging from 27 to 76 years of age (mean age: 55·0 years) after data screening and elimination. The cumulative post-transplantation survival rate at 10 years was 77·1% for separated teeth and 63·6% for non-separated teeth as calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. There were no significant differences between separated teeth and non-separated teeth in a log rank test (P = 0·687). Separated-tooth autotransplantation can help fill narrow recipient sites and increase occlusal supporting zones, but the clinical success rate was only 48·6%. Although transplantation of teeth with complete root formation has limited prognosis, transplantation of upper first and second molars, whether separated or non-separated, is a viable option to replace missing teeth.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 09/2012; · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Summary  The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors affecting long-term prognosis of autotransplantation of third molars with complete root formation in males at dental clinics. Participating dentists were requested to provide information on transplantations they had undertaken from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2010. Data on a total of 708 teeth from 637 patients were collected. After data screening and elimination, participants of this study consisted of 183 teeth of 171 males ranging from 20 to 72 years of age (mean age, 44·8 years). The cumulative survival rate was 86·0% at the 5-year mark, 59·1% at 10 years and 28·0% at 15 years. The mean survival time was 134·5 months, as calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Single factor analysis using the log-rank test showed that the following factors had significant influence (P < 0·05) on survival of transplanted teeth: periodontal disease as the reason for recipient site tooth extraction, fewer than 25 present teeth and Eichner index Groups B1 to C. Cox regression analysis examined five factors: age, smoking habit, recipient site extraction caused by periodontal disease, fewer than 25 present teeth and Eichner index. This analysis showed that two of these factors were significant: fewer than 25 present teeth was 2·63 (95% CI, 1·03-6·69) and recipient site extraction caused by periodontal disease was 3·80 (95% CI, 1·61-9·01). The results of this study suggest that long-term survival of transplanted teeth in males is influenced not only by oral bacterium but also by occlusal status.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 06/2012; 39(11):821-9. · 2.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the usage of tooth autotransplantation in dental clinics which offer the treatment and evaluate its practicality. Participating dentists were requested to provide information on transplantations they had undertaken from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2010. A total of 614 teeth from 552 patients (37 dentists) ranging in age from 17 to 79 (mean age: 44·1) were examined. Cumulative survival rate and mean survival time were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log rank test was used for analysis of factors. The mean number of autotransplantation patients per clinic per year was 1·4. Upper third molars constituted 36·8% of donor teeth, while 37·1% were lower third molars. The lower first molar region was the most common recipient site at 32·6%, followed by the lower second molar region (28·0%). Prosthodontic treatment of transplanted teeth involved coverage with a single crown (72·5%) and abutment of bridge (18·9%). A total of 102 transplanted teeth were lost owing to complications such as attachment loss (54·9%) and root resorption (25·7%). The cumulative survival rate in cases where donor teeth had complete root formation was 90·1% at 5 years, 70·5% at 10 years and 55·6% at 15 years. The mean survival time was 165·6 months. Older age was a significant risk factor (P < 0·05) for survival. In cases where suitable donor teeth are available, autotransplantation of teeth may be a plausible treatment option for dealing with missing teeth in dental clinics.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 07/2011; 39(1):37-43. · 2.34 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

12 Citations
11.72 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2013
    • Tokyo Dental College
      • Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan