M. Guy

University of Bath, Bath, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (5)0 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Twitter is widely used in a range of different contexts, ranging from informal social communications and marketing purposes through to supporting various professional activities in teaching and learning and research. The growth in Twitter use has led to a recognition of the need to ensure that Twitter posts ('tweets') can be accessed and reused by a variety of third party applications. This paper describes development work to the Twapper Keeper Twitter archiving service to support use of Twitter in education and research. The reasons for funding developments to an existing commercial service are described and the approaches for addressing the sustainability of such developments are provided. The paper reviews the challenges this work has addressed including the technical challenges in processing large volumes of traffic and the policy issues related, in particular, to ownership and copyright. The paper concludes by describing the experiences gained in using the service to archive tweets posted during the WWW 2010 conference and summarising plans for further use of the service.
    7th International Conference on Preservation of Digital Objects (iPRES 2010); 01/2010
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    B. Kelly, M. Guy
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    ABSTRACT: Early adopters of blogs will have made use of externally-hosted blog platforms, such as Wordpress.com and Blogger.com, due, perhaps, to the lack of a blogging infrastructure within the institution or concerns regarding restrictive terms and conditions covering use of such services. There will be cases in which such blogs are now well-established and contain useful information not only for current readership but also as a resource which may be valuable for future generations. The need to preserve content which is held on such third-party services (“the Cloud’) provides a set of new challenges which are likely to be distinct from the management of content hosted within the institution, for which institutional policies should address issues such as ownership and scope of content. Such challenges include technical issues, such as the approaches used to gather the content and the formats to be used and policy issues related to ownership, scope and legal issues. This paper describes the approaches taken in UKOLN, an applied research department based at the University of Bath, to the preservation of blogs used in the organisation. The paper covers the technical approaches and policy issues associated with the curation of blogs a number of different types of blogs: blogs used by members of staff in the department; blogs used to support project activities and blogs used to support events.
    7th International Conference on Preservation of Digital Objects (iPRES 2010); 01/2010
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    ABSTRACT: The Open Access movement is promoting the advantages in providing more liberal access conditions to research and teaching and learning resources and is developing a legal infrastructure and associated technologies to support this. This paper argues that IT Services can benefit by adopting a similar approach for IT support materials. A case study is provided which describes the rationale for making the resources developed by the JISC-funded QA Focus project available under a Creative Commons licence and the processes needed in order to implement this policy. The paper concludes by describing the potential for widening this approach to generic IT support materials.
    EUNIS 2005; 01/2009
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    B. Kelly, M. Guy, A. Dunning
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    ABSTRACT: The importance of open standards in the development of widely accessible and interoperable services in the cultural heritage sector is generally accepted. It might, therefore, be reasonable to assume that use of open standards should be mandatory in the development of networked services. However experience has shown that the use of open standards is not always straightforward and that open standards do not always succeed in gaining acceptance in the market place. This should not, however, mean an abandonment of a commitment to seek to exploit the benefits of open standards. Rather there is a need to be honest about possible limitations and to ensure that there is sufficient flexibility within the approaches taken in development work to accommodate limitations and deficiencies. This paper outlines a contextual model for the selection and use of open standards, which was developed initially to support JISC's development programmes within the UK higher and further education community. The paper provides background to this work and reviews the current status of the implementation of this approach. Finally it conclude by describing how this community-based approach to open standards can benefit from a wider acceptance of the contextual model and a collaborative approach to both using existing resources and support materials and in the maintenance and development of new resources.
    Museums and the Web 2007; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: The importance of open standards for providing access to digital resources is widely acknowledged. Bodies such as the W3C are developing the open standards needed to provide universal access to digital cultural heritage resources. However, despite the widespread acceptance of the importance of open standards, in practice many organisations fail to implement open standards in their provision of access to digital resources. It clearly becomes difficult to mandate use of open standards if it is well-known that compliance is seldom enforced. Rather than abandoning open standards or imposing a stricter regime for ensuring compliance, this paper argues that there is a need to adopt a culture which is supportive of use of open standards but provides flexibility to cater for the difficulties in achieving this.
    ichim03; 01/2003