M J Moses

Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia

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Publications (8)84.56 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder was previously localized to chromosome 4q35 by genetic linkage analysis. We have applied a positional cloning strategy, combined with association analysis and provide evidence that a cadherin gene, FAT, confers susceptibility to bipolar disorder in four independent cohorts (allelic P-values range from 0.003 to 0.024). In two case-control cohorts, association was identified among bipolar cases with a family history of psychiatric illness, whereas in two cohorts of parent-proband trios, association was identified among bipolar cases who had exhibited psychosis. Pooled analysis of the case-control cohort data further supported association (P=0.0002, summary odds ratio=2.31, 95% CI: 1.49-3.59). We localized the bipolar-associated region of the FAT gene to an interval that encodes an intracellular EVH1 domain, a domain that interacts with Ena/VASP proteins, as well as putative beta-catenin binding sites. Expression of Fat, Catnb (beta-catenin), and the three genes (Enah, Evl and Vasp) encoding the Ena/VASP proteins, were investigated in mice following administration of the mood-stabilizing drugs, lithium and valproate. Fat was shown to be significantly downregulated (P=0.027), and Catnb and Enah were significantly upregulated (P=0.0003 and 0.005, respectively), in response to therapeutic doses of lithium. Using a protein interaction map, the expression of genes encoding murine homologs of the FAT (ft)-interacting proteins was investigated. Of 14 interacting molecules that showed expression following microarray analysis (including several members of the Wnt signaling pathway), eight showed significantly altered expression in response to therapeutic doses of lithium (binomial P=0.004). Together, these data provide convergent evidence that FAT and its protein partners may be components of a molecular pathway involved in susceptibility to bipolar disorder.
    Molecular Psychiatry 05/2006; 11(4):372-83. · 15.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cause of bipolar disorder remains unknown, with little knowledge of the underlying biological, anatomical, biochemical, or genetic defect. The disorder is genetically complex, with an increasing number of loci being implicated through genetic linkage studies. We previously identified a bipolar disorder susceptibility locus on chromosome 4q35 and refined the interval harboring this susceptibility gene to approximately 5 Mb, a size that is amenable to positional cloning. Several independent studies have reported the presence of a susceptibility gene at this locus. To identify candidate genes for testing for association with bipolar disorder, we previously established a transcript map that encompasses the candidate interval. We have continued to seek novel genes from this region in order to expand this transcript map. Here, we describe the further identification and characterization of eight novel genes from the chromosome 4q35 bipolar candidate interval. Expression analysis determined that six of these novel genes are expressed in the brain, and these genes were therefore analyzed for association with bipolar disorder. Single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified from the candidate genes and tested for association in our case-control cohort. Our data suggest that the six candidate genes analyzed can be excluded from involvement in the disorder.
    Psychiatric Genetics 10/2005; 15(3):199-204. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bipolar affective disorder is a major psychiatric illness with a population prevalence of up to 1.6%. The disorder is genetically complex. To date, no specific gene or DNA sequence variation that predisposes to the disorder has been described, however several susceptibility loci have been proposed through genetic linkage analysis. We previously identified one such susceptibility locus on chromosome 4q35, and refined the interval harboring this susceptibility gene to a size that is amenable to positional cloning. Several independent studies have now been described that support the presence of a susceptibility gene at this locus. In order to identify candidate genes for testing association with bipolar disorder, we previously established a comprehensive transcript map that encompasses the chromosome 4q35 susceptibility locus implicated in our linkage analysis. In this study, we have selected full-length genes from the transcript map and determined the genomic structure of each gene. We identified informative, intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by screening all exons and flanking intron sequences in affected individuals from seven bipolar pedigrees that we previously reported as showing evidence for linkage to chromosome 4q35. Analysis of these SNPs was then extended to our unrelated bipolar case-control cohort to test for association with the disorder. Our data suggests that all genes analyzed can be excluded from direct involvement in the disorder. We have therefore, excluded approximately half the genes within the chromosome 4q35 candidate interval from playing a direct pathogenic role in bipolar disorder.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 05/2005; 134B(1):56-9. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder has been mapped to chromosome 4q35 in a large multigenerational pedigree. We have expanded this analysis to include 55 pedigrees (674 individuals, 214 affecteds). The evidence for linkage to 4q35 was strengthened in this larger cohort, with a maximum two-point LOD score of 3.2 for marker D4S1652. Several other markers in the region gave LOD scores greater than 1.5. Non-parametric analysis provided additional support for linkage to the 4q35 region. To further refine this region, haplotype analysis was carried out in 16 of the 55 pedigrees that showed evidence of linkage. As there is no evidence for an ancestral haplotype, nor a one-to-one correspondence between the disease and putative disease haplotype, we undertook an analysis based on pedigree-specific, identical-by-descent allele-sharing in order to define a probable disease region. This analysis indicated that the percentage sharing of alleles, identical-by-descent, in affecteds of all linked pedigrees increases from 60% at the centromeric markers to 75% for markers at the telomere. Maximal allele sharing occurred between markers D4S3051 and 4qTEL13 with this 24 cM region defining a probable disease region. We have constructed a physical map of the 4q35 interval consisting of a YAC contig and BAC clones. Based on this map the probable disease region between D4S3051 and 4qTEL13 corresponds to only 2.3 Mb. This region is very gene poor with only three known genes indicated from the YAC/BAC map. The small number of genes will facilitate systematic screening for variations associated with bipolar disorder.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B Neuropsychiatric Genetics 03/2003; 117B(1):23-32. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    Molecular Psychiatry 02/2002; 7(7):669. · 15.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bipolar affective disorder is one of the most common mental illnesses with a population prevalence of approximately 1%. The disorder is genetically complex, with an increasing number of loci being implicated through genetic linkage studies. However, the specific genetic variations and molecules involved in bipolar susceptibility and pathogenesis are yet to be identified. Genetic linkage analysis has identified a bipolar disorder susceptibility locus on chromosome 4q35, and the interval harbouring this susceptibility gene has been narrowed to a size that is amenable to positional cloning. We have used the resources of the Human Genome Project (HGP) and Celera Genomics to identify overlapping sequenced BAC clones and sequence contigs that represent the region implicated by linkage analysis. A combination of bioinformatic tools and laboratory techniques have been applied to annotate this DNA sequence data and establish a comprehensive transcript map that spans approximately 5.5 Mb. This map encompasses the chromosome 4q35 bipolar susceptibility locus, which localises to a "most probable" candidate interval of approximately 2.3 Mb, within a more conservative candidate interval of approximately 5 Mb. Localised within this map are 11 characterised genes and eight novel genes of unknown function, which together provide a collection of candidate transcripts that may be investigated for association with bipolar disorder. Overall, this region was shown to be very gene-poor, with a high incidence of pseudogenes, and redundant and novel repetitive elements. Our analysis of the interval has demonstrated a significant difference in the extent to which the current HGP and Celera sequence data sets represent this region.
    Molecular Psychiatry 02/2002; 7(8):867-73. · 15.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bipolar affective disorder is a severe mood disorder that afflicts approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Twin and adoption studies have indicated that genetic factors contribute to the disorder and while many chromosomal regions have been implicated, no susceptibility genes have been identified. We undertook a combined analysis of 10 cM genome screen data from a single large bipolar affective disorder pedigree, for which we have previously reported linkage to chromosome 13q14 (Badenhop et al, 2001) and 12 pedigrees independently screened using the same 400 microsatellite markers. This 13 pedigree cohort consisted of 231 individuals, including 69 affected members. Two-point LOD score analysis was carried out under heterogeneity for three diagnostic and four genetic models. Non-parametric multipoint analysis was carried out on regions of interest. Two-point heterogeneity LOD scores (HLODs) greater than 1.5 were obtained for 11 markers across the genome, with HLODs greater than 2.0 obtained for four of these markers. The strongest evidence for linkage was at 3q25-26 with a genome-wide maximum score of 2.49 at D3S1279. Six markers across a 50 cM region at 3q25-26 gave HLODs greater than 1.5, with three of these markers producing scores greater than 2.0. Multipoint analysis indicated a 20 cM peak between markers D3S1569 and D3S1614 with a maximum NPL of 2.8 (P = 0.004). Three other chromosomal regions yielded evidence for linkage: 9q31-q33, 13q14 and 19q12-q13. The regions on chromosomes 3q and 13q have previously been implicated in other bipolar and schizophrenia studies. In addition, several individual pedigrees gave LOD scores greater than 1.5 for previously reported bipolar susceptibility loci on chromosomes 18p11, 18q12, 22q11 and 8p22-23.
    Molecular Psychiatry 02/2002; 7(8):851-9. · 15.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bipolar affective disorder is a severe mood disorder that afflicts approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Twin and adoption studies have indicated that genetic factors contribute to the disorder and while many chromosomal regions have been implicated, no susceptibility genes have been identified. In this present study, we undertook a 10 cM genome screen using 400 microsatellite markers in a large multigenerational bipolar pedigree consisting of 40 individuals, including six affecteds. We found strongest evidence for linkage to chromosome 13q14. A maximum NPL score of 4.09 (P = 0.008) was obtained between markers D13S1272 and D13S153 using GENEHUNTER. A maximum two-point LOD score of 2.91 (theta = 0.0) was found for marker D13S153 and a maximum three-point LOD score of 3.0 was obtained between markers D13S291 and D13S153 under a recessive model with 90% maximum age-specific penetrance and including bipolar I and unipolar individuals as affected. Several other markers in the region, D13S175, D13S218, D13S263, and D13S156 had two-point LOD scores greater than 1.5. These results meet the criteria for evidence of suggestive linkage. Haplotype analysis enabled us to narrow the likely disease region to a 6 cM region between markers D13S1272 and D13S1319, which contains the serotonin 2A receptor candidate gene. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in this gene but we did not detect any significant differences in allele frequency in a case-control sample. The region on chromosome 13q14-32 has previously been implicated in other bipolar and schizophrenia cohorts. Our results provide further support for the existence of a susceptibility locus on chromosome 13q14.
    Molecular Psychiatry 08/2001; 6(4):396-403. · 15.15 Impact Factor