M Faure

Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou (Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris-Ouest), Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (16)19.79 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Acne can have an important psychological impact. We surveyed 852 adolescents aged 12-25 years about their knowledge of acne and its treatment in a non-medical context. The study involved a questionnaire administered to callers to a youth telephone helpline in France. Callers were categorized into those who currently had acne, those who had had acne previously, and those who had never had acne. Most respondents (66.2%) had experienced acne symptoms, which were mild in 50.2% of cases and severe in 16% of cases. Often, acne had been long-lasting (>12 months in 49.6% of cases). Many thought that gender, excess weight, eating dairy products, and physical activity did not influence acne, and that frequent washing could improve acne. Eating chocolate and snacks, smoking cigarettes, sweating, not washing, touching/squeezing spots, eating fatty foods, using make-up, pollution, and menstruation were thought to worsen acne. The majority (80.8%) did not believe acne to be a disease, but rather a normal phase of adolescence, yet 69.3% agreed it should be treated. There was a preference for topical vs. systemic treatment. Many (38.6%) of the respondents with acne had not consulted a physician. Almost two-thirds of respondents wanted more information about acne. Providing more information about acne might increase the likelihood of them consulting a physician and getting better treatment for the condition.
    Acta Dermato-Venereologica 05/2011; 91(5):531-6.
  • Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie 01/2011; 138(1):23-9. · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many acne grading methods exist; however, there is no agreed-upon standard. Our objective was to create and validate a reproducible acne assessment scale for rating the severity of juvenile facial acne suitable for use in France and Europe. The scale we created described the different types of acne lesions in a manner similar to global assessment scales used in clinical trials. The scale was then validated by seven expert dermatologists in the field of acne [the Global Evaluation Acne (GEA) group] first on 34 photographic cases of Caucasian acne patients and second by clinical examination of 22 acne patients. There was good agreement in Investigators' assessments of acne both on photographs and patients (R = 0.8057; P < 0.0001, and R = 0.8437; P = 0.0015). The GEA Scale is a global scale validated both on photographs and acne patients which can be used either in clinical research or by the dermatologist in his office.
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 04/2010; 25(1):43-8. · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The three-grade acne classification (mild, moderate, severe) is widely used to define the licensed indications of acne treatments, and for therapeutic decision-making in clinical practice, but its reproducibility has never been assessed. Ten photographs of facial acne were scored independently by eight experts using the three-grade acne classification. We conducted a descriptive analysis of the results, based on graphical representation of the scores for each photograph. Inter-observer agreement on acne severity based on the three-grade acne classification was very poor. The classical three-grade acne classification is poorly reproducible. A new rating tool accompanied by a clinical description of each severity level would be extremely useful.
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 06/2009; 24(2):196-8. · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Existing scoring systems for facial acne focus on the lesions themselves, but clinical decisions are based on a general assessment of severity, including the time since onset, the site(s) of involvement, the patient's history, and the response to prior treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of some of these factors on the global assessment of acne severity. Involvement of the trunk, prior systemic treatment and a positive family history of acne increased the severity score. Inclusion of these factors could help to compose more homogeneous groups for clinical trials.
    Acta Dermato-Venereologica 02/2009; 89(4):369-71.
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    ABSTRACT: Acne is a disorder in which adherence has a major impact on treatment outcome. To create an easy-to-use tool to assess treatment adherence, based on a questionnaire that can be used on a daily basis by dermatologists. First, we evaluated adherence by comparing responses to a self-administered questionnaire with the dermatologist's prescription. Second, concordance was assessed between adherence and each question of a dermatologist-directed questionnaire (DDQ) administered during the consultation. Third, DDQ questions were combined to construct a mini-questionnaire, and these combinations were tested to maximize specificity. The study included 246 patients, who were prescribed topical treatment alone, combined treatment (excluding oral isotretinoin) or oral isotretinoin alone. The mini-questionnaires for oral and topical treatments had 89% specificity for detecting poor adherence. An inappropriate answer to one question classified the patient as a probable poor compliance. Our mini-questionnaires provide dermatologists with specific tools to rapidly identify poor compliance.
    Dermatology 11/2008; 218(1):26-32. · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Practicing dermatologists rarely evaluate therapeutic trials. This study was designed to build a simple evaluation tool, use it to evaluate the quality of published trials and thereby consider their applicability. Reports on 146 therapeutic trials, published from 1969 to 2004, were selected. A 50-item list was used for an initial assessment. After comparison with existing grids, a shortened nine-item list was established and used for this analysis. The results were analyzed item by item (logistic regression) and globally (principal component analysis). An index was then established and validated using Cronbach's coefficient alpha. The overall quality of trials was poor: 9% to 73% positive response range. This rate increased after 1990 for six items. Two factors explained almost 60% of the total variance: factor 1 summing six items concerning the formal content of the articles and factor 2 its underlying basis. Using the sum of these six variables, Cronbach's coefficient alpha reached 0.716; their mean sum improved from 1969 to 1970-2001-2005. The significantly improved quality of trials, based on the mean sum over time, supports well-founded basis of this tool. Regarding the application of evidence-based medicine in clinical practice, this tool is user friendly and should facilitate the updating of our knowledge.
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 08/2008; 22(7):800-6. · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acne is a highly heterogeneous disorder with respect to its regional involvement, demographics, lesion types and response to treatment. Homogeneous patient groups must therefore be created before measuring the severity of acne and interpreting the results of therapeutic trials. The individualization of 'juvenile acne of the face' is a first step in this direction. Based on textbooks, major reviews of acne and a 'Medline' literature search, we identified four key points to delineate sub groups of acne patients. 'Juvenile acne of the face' is defined by four main clinical criteria: (1) age (from puberty to age 25 years), (2) site (face), (3) lesion type (polymorphous), (4) absence of a causal factor. Other subgroups of 'true' acne are listed with their distinctive characteristics. Non-acne follicular diseases (i.e. without sebum retention) are listed. We chose 'juvenile acne of the face' to define the first homogeneous group of patients because it is the most frequent form of acne and the target of most acne drugs. It has a sufficiently uniform prognosis to devise a functional and reproducible severity rating scale with the aim of facilitating the evaluation and comparison of therapeutic methods. The next step in our work will be to elaborate severity scales which are dedicated to a single type of acne.
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 07/2008; 22(12):1429-34. · 2.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The psychological consequences of acne are frequently unrelated to the severity of the actual lesions. Thus, a number of scales have been designed and validated to allow quantitation of the severity of acne, such as the ECLA scale (Echelle de Cotation des Lésions d'Acné or Acne Lesion Score Scale) while others are designed to evaluate quality of life, such as the CADI (Cardiff Acne Disability Index) questionnaire recently validated in the French language. The purpose of this study was to use both of these scales in individual applications in order to determine whether or not any correlation exists between the two specific tools and to determine the two groups of patients affected by acne. One hundred and twenty-eight acne patients (21+/-6.8 years) seen by seven dermatologists were included in this study. The severity of their acne was evaluated using the ECLA scale; the seven participating dermatologists were trained in the use of this scoring system. In addition, patients completed the CADI quality-of-life questionnaire after their consultation. Each factor on the ECLA was compared with each item in the CADI questionnaire by means of analysis of variance. There was no correlation between overall scores on the ECLA and CADI scales (r(2)=0.0242). However, a positive correlation was observed between overall CADI score and factors F1 and F3 in the ECLA scale (p=0.0085 and p=0.0373 respectively). In contrast, the global score on the ECLA scale was significantly correlated with item 5 of the CADI questionnaire, namely patients' perception of their acne (p=0.0035). Acne, even in mild forms, has a detrimental psychological effect on patients. The ECLA score coupled with the CADI assessment system appear to be two useful and complementary scores for use in complete acne patient management.
    Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie 06/2007; 134(5 Pt 1):451-5. · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acne can have important psychological repercussions. We studied adolescents' perceptions of acne, in a nonmedical context. Between November 2004 and January 2005, a questionnaire was presented to adolescents calling a youth helpline. It focused on perceptions of acne and, among callers with personal experience of acne, its severity and treatment. Callers were divided into those with acne, those having had acne and those never having had acne. The questionnaire was completed by 1,566 callers. It showed that 51% of respondents with acne did not seek medical help; acne has as big a psychological impact as some far severer diseases; many respondents with no history of acne said they were very worried that they would develop this skin disorder. This study underlines the major psychological impact of acne. Young people need to be informed that acne can be treated.
    Dermatology 02/2007; 215(4):308-14. · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The psychological consequences of acne are frequently unrelated to the severity of the actual lesions. Thus, a number of scales have been designed and validated to allow quantitation of the severity of acne, such as the ECLA scale (Échelle de Cotation des Lésions d’Acné or Acne Lesion Score Scale) while others are designed to evaluate quality of life, such as the CADI (Cardiff Acne Disability Index) questionnaire recently validated in the French language. The purpose of this study was to use both of these scales in individual applications in order to determine whether or not any correlation exists between the two specific tools and to determine the two groups of patients affected by acne.Methods One hundred and twenty-eight acne patients (21±6.8 years) seen by seven dermatologists were included in this study. The severity of their acne was evaluated using the ECLA scale; the seven participating dermatologists were trained in the use of this scoring system. In addition, patients completed the CADI quality-of-life questionnaire after their consultation. Each factor on the ECLA was compared with each item in the CADI questionnaire by means of analysis of variance.ResultsThere was no correlation between overall scores on the ECLA and CADI scales (r2=0.0242). However, a positive correlation was observed between overall CADI score and factors F1 and F3 in the ECLA scale (p=0.0085 and p=0.0373 respectively). In contrast, the global score on the ECLA scale was significantly correlated with item 5 of the CADI questionnaire, namely patients’ perception of their acne (p=0.0035).Conclusion Acne, even in mild forms, has a detrimental psychological effect on patients. The ECLA score coupled with the CADI assessment system appear to be two useful and complementary scores for use in complete acne patient management.
    Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie 01/2007; 134(5):451-455. · 0.60 Impact Factor
  • Annales De Dermatologie Et De Venereologie - ANN DERMATOL VENEREOL. 01/2007; 134(8):685-685.
  • Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie 11/2006; 133(10):813-24. · 0.60 Impact Factor
  • Annales De Dermatologie Et De Venereologie - ANN DERMATOL VENEREOL. 01/2006; 133(10):813-824.
  • Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie 02/2003; 130(1 Pt 2):151-2. · 0.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acne is the most frequent reason for seeing a dermatologist, but its physiopathology is not completely well-known. Yet understanding of the mechanisms of action of the different acne treatments is very important to optimize their use. A lot of new data on the physiopathology have recently been published in the acne field. This paper summarizes the main points of these new facts.
    European journal of dermatology: EJD 14(1):4-12. · 1.95 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

108 Citations
19.79 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011
    • Hôpital Européen Georges-Pompidou (Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris-Ouest)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2007–2009
    • CHU de Lyon - Groupement Hospitalier Edouard Herriot
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2008
    • Hôpital Henri Mondor (Hôpitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor)
      • Service de Dermatologie
      Créteil, Ile-de-France, France