M Larsen

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, United States

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Publications (56)113.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A plot experiment was conducted to investigate the ability of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans to reduce the transmission of infective horse strongyle larvae from deposited dung onto surrounding herbage. At three different times during the summer 1995, three groups of horses, naturally infected with large and small strongyles, were fed different doses of D. flagrans spores, while a fourth group of animals served as non-fungal controls. Faeces from all four groups of horses were deposited as artificial dung pats on a parasite-free pasture. Every second week for 8 weeks after dung deposition, a subsample of the herbage surrounding each dung pat was collected and the number of larvae on the grass determined. Also, the larval reduction capacity of the fungus was evaluated by faecal cultures set up from all groups of horses. The faecal cultures showed that a sufficient number of spores of D. flagrans survived passage through the horses alimentary tract to significantly reduce the number of developing larvae. A lower reduction of larval numbers was observed when a different batch of fungal material was used at the beginning of the season. Dry climatic conditions affected the transmission of infective larvae in all groups, resulting in low numbers of larvae on the herbage. During the rainy periods a significant reduction in the number of larvae recovered was observed around all fungal containing pats. There were no significant differences between the number of fungal spores and the level of reduction caused by the fungus.
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    ABSTRACT: An experiment was completed to determine if copper oxide wire particles (COWP) had any effect on the activity of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans in growing lambs. COWP has been used recently as a dewormer in small ruminants because of nematode resistance to anthelmintics. D. flagrans has been used to control free-living stages of parasitic nematodes in livestock. Katahdin and Dorper lambs, 4 months of age, were administered no or 4 g COWP (n=24/dose) in early October 2003. Haemonchus contortus was the predominant gastrointestinal parasite during the trial, which was acquired naturally from pasture. Half the lambs from each COWP group were supplemented with corn/soybean meal with or without D. flagrans for 35 days. Fecal egg counts (FEC) and packed cell volume (PCV) were determined weekly between days 0 (day of COWP administration) and 35. Feces from lambs in each treatment group were pooled and three replicates per group were cultured for 14 days at room temperature. Larvae (L3) were identified and counted per gram of feces cultured. Treatment with COWP was effective in decreasing FEC, which remained low compared with FEC from lambs not treated with COWP. This led to an increase in PCV in these lambs (COWP x day, P<0.001). Number of larvae was decreased in feces from lambs treated with COWP and D. flagrans between days 14 and 35 compared to the other groups of lambs (COWP x D. flagrans x day, P<0.003). Percentage of larvae identified as H. contortus decreased in feces collected from lambs treated with COWP and D. flagrans between days 14 and 28 compared with other treatments (COWP x D. flagrans x day, P<0.05). Other trichostrongyles were present and remained less than 7% in feces collected from control lambs. There was no adverse effect of COWP on the ability of D. flagrans to trap residual larvae after COWP treatment. With fewer eggs being excreted due to the effect of copper on H. contortus, and the additional larval reducing effect exerted by the nematode destroying fungus D. flagrans, the expected result would be a much lower larval challenge on pasture when these two tools are used together in a sustainable control strategy.
    Veterinary Parasitology 11/2005; 134(1-2):141-6. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With the advent of helminth parasite populations that have developed resistance to anthelmintics over the last decade or so, especially in small ruminants, sustainable productivity has been threatened. This workshop on novel approaches to control was held at the 19th International Conference of the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) at New Orleans,LA, USA, during 10–14 August 2003. The workshop was organized and chaired by J.E. Miller and P.J. Waller. Novel or alternative approaches to control have been the focus of research (basic and applied) in many parts of the world. The objective of the workshop was to discuss where we have been and what direction(s) appears to be viable for both the short and long term future. In the long term, all represented regions at the workshop have promulgated programs where breeding for resistance may be the best approach as genes for resistance can be fixed in host populations. However,it does take many years to achieve results and the question of tradeoff concerning alteration of production traits needs further evaluation. Vaccination, especially against Haemonchus contortus,has been a thrust of laboratories in Scotland and Australia where natural “hidden gut” antigens have shown promise, but recombinant products have yet to be developed. In Europe, North and South America, Australia, South Africa and Asia, biocontrol using the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans has been shown to be effective under experimental conditions, but some field evaluations have been disappointing. Most recently, the FAMACHA system was developed in South Africa. This system is directly and immediately applicable to all regions where H. contortus is a problem. Although not a new or novel approach, copper-oxide wire particles have been revived as a means to control H. contortus.Work being done in Europe, North and South America,South Africa and Australia have shown very encouraging results and can probably be considered the best short term approach available. However, caution needs to be considered in sheep to avoid potential copper toxicity problems. Work in New Zealand, Scotland and the US with forages and feeds containing condensed tannins have shown some limited control. Many laboratories have demonstrated that adequate and balanced nutrition programs are also important to maintain mechanisms that combat infections. Overall, no one approach alone is the answer. Approaches that are integrated, including “smart” use of anthelmintics, are necessary.
    Veterinary parasitology. 10/2004; 125(1-2):59-68.
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies on sheep and goat farms in the southern United States indicate that multiple-anthelmintic resistance in Haemonchus contortus is becoming a severe problem. Though many factors are involved in the evolution of resistance, the proportion of the parasite population under drug selection is believed to be the single most important factor influencing how rapidly resistance develops. Therefore, where prevention of resistance is an important parallel goal of worm control, it is recommended to leave a portion of the animals untreated. Recently, a novel system called FAMACHA was developed in South Africa, which enables clinical identification of anemic sheep and goats. When H. contortus is the primary parasitic pathogen, this system can be applied on the farm level to reduce the number of treatments administered, thereby increasing the proportion of the worm population in refugia. Since most studies validating the FAMACHA method have been performed in South Africa, it is important that the method be tested in other regions before its use is broadly recommended. We performed a validation study of FAMACHA by testing the system in sheep (n = 847) and goats (n = 537) of various breeds and ages from 39 farms located in Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Florida, and the US Virgin Islands. The color of the ocular conjunctiva of all animals were scored on a 1-5 scale using the FAMACHA card, and blood samples were collected from each animal for determination of packed cell volume (PCV). Fecal samples were also collected from a majority of the animals tested for performance of fecal egg counts (FEC). Correlations between PCV and eye scores, PCV and FEC, and FEC and eye scores were all highly significant for both sheep and goats (P < 0.001). Data for both FAMACHA scores and PCV were evaluated using two separate criteria for anemia: eye score values of 3, 4 and 5 or 4 and 5, and PCV values of < or =19 or < or =15 were considered anemic. Specificity was maximized when eye score values of 4 and 5 were considered anemic and PCV cut off for anemia was < or =19, but sensitivity was low. In contrast, sensitivity was 100% for both sheep and goats when eye score values of 3, 4 and 5 were considered anemic and PCV cut off was < or =15, but specificity was low. In both sheep and goats, predictive value of a negative was greater than 92% for all anemia and eye score categories, and was greater than 99% for both eye score categories when an anemia cutoff of < or =15 was used. Predictive value of a positive test was low under all criteria indicating that many non-anemic animals would be treated using this system. However, compared to conventional dosing practices where all animals are treated, a large proportion of animals would still be left untreated. These data indicate that the FAMACHA method is an extremely useful tool for identifying anemic sheep and goats in the southern US and US Virgin Islands. However, further studies are required to determine optimal strategies for incorporating FAMACHA-based selective treatment protocols into integrated nematode control programs.
    Veterinary Parasitology 09/2004; 123(1-2):105-20. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infection with gastrointestinal nematodes, particularly Haemonchus contortus, is a major constraint to goat production in the southeastern United States. Non-anthelmintic control alternatives are needed due to increasing resistance of these nematodes to available anthelmintics. Two studies were completed in Central Georgia in August 1999, and April-May 2000, using Spanish does naturally infected with Haemonchus contortus, Trichostongylus colubriformis, and Cooperia spp. to evaluate effectiveness of nematode-trapping fungi as a biological control agent. In the first experiment, five levels of Duddingtonia flagrans spores were mixed with a complete diet and fed once daily to the does (three per treatment) in metabolism crates. The treatment concentrations were (1) 5 x 10(5), (2) 2.5 x 10(5), (3) 10(5), and (4) 5 x 10(4) spores per kilogram body weight (BW), and (5) no spores. Fungal spores were fed for the first 7 days of the 14-day trial, and fecal samples were collected daily from individual animals for analysis of fecal egg count and establishment of fecal cultures. Efficacy of the fungus at reducing development of infective larvae (L3) in the fecal cultures was evaluated. The mean reduction in L3 from day 2 of the treatment period until the day after treatment stopped (days 2-8) was 93.6, 80.2, 84.1, and 60.8% for animals given the highest to lowest spore doses, respectively. Within 3-6 days after termination of fungal spore feedings, reduction in L3 development was no longer apparent in any of the treated animals. In a second experiment, effectiveness of 2.5 x 10(5) spores of D. flagrans per kilogram BW fed to does every day, every second day, and every third day was evaluated. Reduction in L3 development by daily feeding was less in the second experiment than in the first experiment. Daily fungal spore feeding provided more consistent larval reduction than intermittant feeding (every second or third day). When fed daily under controlled conditions, D. flagrans was effective in significantly reducing development of L3 and appears to be an effective tool for biocontrol of parasitic nematodes in goats.
    Veterinary Parasitology 05/2004; 120(4):285-96. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Long-term field studies were conducted on two government managed small ruminant research farms, located in different geo-climatic regions and approximately 300 km separate from each other, on Peninsula Malaysia. The Infoternak trial (48 weeks) and the Chalok trial (43 weeks) each compared nematode parasite control in separately managed groups of young sheep, either short-term rotationally grazed around a suite of 10 paddocks in addition to receiving a daily supplement of Duddingtonia flagrans spores (Fungus Group); or similar groups of sheep being rotationally grazed alone (Control Group). The prevailing weather conditions at Infoternak farm were of below average rainfall conditions for the most of the trial. As a consequence, only very low worm infections (almost exclusively Haemonchus contortus) were acquired by the 17 sets of tracer lambs that grazed sequentially with the experimental lambs. However on all except 2 occasions in the early part of the trial, the mean tracer worm burdens were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and the experimental lambs grew significantly better (P = 0.054) in the Fungus Group. Rainfall at Chalok farm during the course of the trial was also below average. As a consequence infectivity of pastures was assumed to be relatively low based on faecal egg counts (epg) of the experimental sheep, which following an anthelmintic treatment prior to allocation, remained very low in both treatment groups. Faecal egg counts of undosed replacement lambs in the latter half of the Chalok study, showed a progressive increase in the Control Group to levels exceeding 3000 epg, whereas the Fungus Group remained static at approximately 500 epg. These results show that the deployment of the nematophagous fungus, D. flagrans, can improve the level of parasite control of sheep in the tropics above that which can be achieved by the short-term rotational grazing strategy alone.
    Veterinary Parasitology 04/2004; 120(3):177-87. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The fungus, Duddingtonia flagrans, is able to trap and kill free-living nematode larvae of the cattle parasite Cooperia oncophora when chlamydospores are mixed in cattle faeces. Isolates of Bacillus subtilis (two isolates), Pseudomonas spp. (three isolates) and single isolates of the fungal genera Alternaria, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Trichoderma and Verticillium were isolated from cattle faeces and shown to reduce D. flagrans growth on agar plates. When these isolates were added to cattle faeces containing D. flagrans and nematode larvae of C. oncophora, developing from eggs, none of the isolates reduced nematode mortality attributed to D. flagrans. Similarly, the coprophilic fungus Pilobolus kleinii, which cannot be cultivated on agar, also failed to suppress the ability of D. flagrans to trap and kill developing larvae of C. oncophora. Increasing chlamydospore doses of D. flagrans in faecal cultures resulted in higher nematode mortality. Thus, no evidence of interspecific or intraspecific competition was observed. The consequences of these findings are discussed.
    Journal of Helminthology 04/2004; 78(1):41-6. · 1.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal nematodes are of concern in sheep production because of production and economic losses. Control of these nematodes is primarily based on the use of anthelmintic treatment and pasture management. The almost exclusive use of anthelmintic treatment has resulted in development of anthelmintic resistance which has led to the need for other parasite control options to be explored. The blood sucking abomasal parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus causes severe losses in small ruminant production in the warm, humid sub-tropic and tropics. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a nematode trapping fungus, Duddingtonia flagrans, in reducing availability of parasitic nematode larvae, specifically H. contortus, on pasture. Chlamydospores of D. flagrans were mixed with a supplement feed which was fed daily to a group of crossbred ewes for the duration of the summer grazing season. A control group was fed the same supplement feed without chlamydospores. A reduction in infective larval numbers was observed in fecal cultures of the fungus-fed group. Herbage samples from the pasture grazed by the fungus-fed group also showed a reduction in infective larvae. There were no significant (P > 0.05) differences in overall fecal egg count, packed cell volume or animal weight between fungus-fed and control groups. Tracer animals were placed on the study pastures at the end of the study to assess pasture infectivity. Although tracer animals were only two per group, those that grazed with the fungus-fed group had substantially reduced (96.8%) nematode burdens as compared to those from the control group pasture. Results demonstrated that the fungus did have activity against nematode larvae in the feces which reduced pasture infectivity and subsequently nematode burdens in tracer animals. This study showed that D. flagrans, fed daily to grazing ewes, was an effective biological control agent in reducing a predominantly H. contortus larval population on pasture.
    Veterinary Parasitology 01/2004; 118(3-4):203-13. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Control of nematode parasites of small ruminants in a wet, tropical environment using the nematophagous fungus, Duddingtonia flagrans, was assessed in this study. Two methods of fungal delivery were tested, namely as a daily feed supplement, or incorporated into feed blocks. Initially, pen trials were conducted with individually penned groups of sheep and goats at dose rates of 125,000 spores and 250,000 spores/kg live weight per day. At the lower dose rate this reduction was between 80 and 90% compared with the pre-treatment levels. At the higher dose rate, there was virtually complete suppression (>99% reduction) of larval recovery. Trials using the fungal feed blocks, showed that when animals were individually penned, they consumed only small amounts of the block (particularly goats), hence little effect on larval recovery in faecal cultures was observed. Grouping animals according to species and dose rate induced satisfactory block consumption and subsequent high levels of larval reduction in faecal cultures. These larval reductions were mirrored by the presence of fungus in faecal cultures. This work was followed by a small paddock trial, whereby three groups of sheep were fed either a feed supplement without fungal spores, supplement with spores, or offered fungal blocks. The dose rate of spores in the latter two groups was 500,000 spores/kg live weight per day. Egg counts were significantly reduced in the two fungal groups, compared with the control group and the latter required two salvage anthelmintic treatments to prevent mortality due to haemonchosis. Pasture larval numbers on the two fungal group plots were also much lower than on the control plot.
    Veterinary Parasitology 12/2003; 117(3):173-83. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine prevalence of resistance to all anthelmintics that are commonly used to treat gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) in goats. Prospective study. 777 goats. On each farm, goats were assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups: untreated controls, albendazole (20 mg/kg [9.0 mg/lb], p.o., once), ivermectin (0.4 mg/kg [0.18 mg/lb], p.o., once), levamisole (12 mg/kg [5.4 mg/lb], p.o., once), or moxidectin (0.4 mg/kg, p.o., once), except on 3 farms where albendazole was omitted. Fecal samples were collected 2 weeks after treatment for determination of fecal egg counts (FECs), and percentage reductions were calculated by comparing data from anthelmintic-treated and control groups. Nematode populations were categorized as susceptible, suspected resistant, or resistant by use of guidelines published by the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology. Resistance to albendazole was found on 14 of 15 farms, and resistance to ivermectin, levamisole, and moxidectin was found on 17, 6, and 1 of 18 farms, respectively. Suspected resistance to levamisole and moxidectin was found on 4 and 3 farms, respectively. Resistance to multiple anthelmintics (albendazole and ivermectin) was found on 14 of 15 farms and to albendazole, ivermectin, and levamisole on 5 of 15 farms. Mean overall FEC reduction percentages for albendazole, ivermectin, levamisole, and moxidectin were 67, 54, 94, and 99%, respectively. Anthelmintic resistance in GINs of goats is highly prevalent in the southern United States. The high prevalence of resistance to multiple anthelmintics emphasizes the need for reexamination of nematode control practices.
    Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 09/2003; 223(4):495-500. · 1.72 Impact Factor
  • M Faedo, M Larsen, J Grønvold
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    ABSTRACT: Two studies were conducted to investigate the growth and activity of the fungus, Duddingtonia flagrans, within cattle faecal pats. Artificial faecal pats were constructed with the centre separated from the outer layer by a nylon mesh. Eight treatments were tested, by varying the presence/absence of Cooperia oncophora eggs and fungal spores within each layer. With parasite eggs in the centre layer, a statistically lower recovery of larvae was observed compared to both pats with parasite eggs in the periphery and pats with parasite eggs throughout both layers. Regardless of location within the pat, if co-located with the parasite egg, D. flagrans was found to be effective in trapping developing larvae. The reduction in recovery of larvae from pats with parasite eggs and fungal spores in the centre was found to be significantly higher than when parasite eggs were in the centre and fungal spores in the periphery. In the second study, pats were made up in two treatments: pats containing fungal spores and C. oncophora eggs (fungus) and pats containing C. oncophora eggs (control). The pats were incubated at low or high humidity. Ten pats were used in a cross over where five pats incubated at low humidity for 7 weeks were removed, water added and then incubated at a high humidity for 1 week. Another five pats were incubated at a high humidity for 7 weeks, aerated and incubated at a low humidity for 1 week. There was no apparent growth of fungus in faecal pats incubated at a high humidity and less than 20% of larvae were recovered. The growth of D. flagrans was observed in faecal pats incubated at a low humidity, but a corresponding reduction in the percentage recovery of larvae did not occur, except in week 4. No statistical difference between fungal and control pats was seen in the change over pats. Nematophagous activity was assessed throughout the study and observed in the first 4 weeks within the pats containing fungus.
    Journal of Helminthology 01/2003; 76(4):295-302. · 1.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Consequences of nematode infections due to Haemonchus contortus are a serious constraint for the sheep industry worldwide. Development of anthelmintic resistance and increasing concern about the impact of anthelmintic use dictate the need of alternative control. Such an alternative is using the nematode trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans to reduce infective larvae levels on pasture. Two trials were conducted to determine the effect of D. flagrans in reducing infective larvae (predominantly H. contortus) in feces. The first trial determined the dose effect of D. flagrans in reducing infective larvae in feces. Eighteen ewes were dewormed to remove existing infections and randomly assigned to six treatment groups: 5 x 10(4), 1 x 10(5), 2.5 x 10(5), 5 x 10(5), 1 x 10(6) or no (control) spores of D. flagrans per kg of body weight mixed in their feed for 7 days. Fecal samples were collected daily from these and from infected donor ewes. Feces from individual-treated ewes were mixed with equal amounts of donor ewe feces, theoretically approximating oral dose spore concentrations of 2.5 x 10(4), 5 x 10(4), 1.25 x 10(5), 2.5 x 10(5), 5 x 10(5) and no spores, and were cultured. Across dosages and during the 7 days of fungus feeding, percent reduction of infective larvae ranged from 76.6 to 100.0%. The second trial determined the effect of D. flagrans at the dose of 10(5) spores per kg body weight on reducing infective larvae in feces from naturally infected lambs. Twenty lambs were randomly assigned to either treatment or control groups based on fecal egg count. Treatment lambs were fed spores mixed in feed for 7 days. Feces were collected daily and cultured. During the 7 days of fungus feeding, the percent reduction of infective larvae ranged from 82.8 to 99.7%. Results of these trials demonstrated that the nematode trapping fungus D. flagrans was highly effective in reducing infective larvae in sheep feces and should be considered as a biological control agent for integrated nematode control programs.
    Veterinary Parasitology 02/2002; 103(3):259-65. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Approximately 2,800 fresh dung samples from animals, mainly ruminant livestock, were screened for the presence of nematophagous fungi in Malaysia. Arthrobotrys spp. was noted on numerous occasions, but only one isolate of Duddingtonia flagrans was made. For the purposes of producing sufficient quantities of this fungus for feeding trials in sheep, various, commonly available, cheap plant materials were tested as possible growth substrates. This showed that cereal grains (wheat, millet and rice) were the best media for fungal growth. Pen feeding trials were carried out using sheep, both naturally and experimentally infected with nematode parasites (predominantely Haemonchus contortus), to test the efficiency of D. flagrans when administered either in a grain supplement, or incorporated into a feed block. These showed that the fungus survived gut passage in sheep and that dose rates of approximately 1 x 10(6) D. flagrans spores / animal / day, reduced the percentage of infective larvae developing in faecal cultures by more than 90%. These results indicate that using D. flagrans as a biological control agent of nematode parasites, is a promising alternative to nematode parasite control of small ruminants in Malaysia, where anthelmintic resistance is now a major problem.
    Veterinary Research 01/2002; 33(6):685-96. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The results reported in this paper represent work from two separate experiments, namely a plot trial using cattle feces conducted at Kungsãngen in Uppsala, Sweden and a plot trial using sheep feces undertaken at Tåstrup in Copenhagen, Denmark. In both trials, a technique was used to monitor the level of Duddingtonia flagrans propagules in soil surrounding feces. The feces were from animals fed or not fed D. flagrans fungal chlamydospores. Also presented are the numbers of soil nematodes in soil surrounding sheep feces. The results indicate that D. flagrans has little growth beyond the fecal environment into surrounding soil when chlamydospores are fed to either sheep or cattle. This is substantiated by the soil nematode data. No statistical differences in the number of nematode taxa identified, Shannon Weiner H′, proportion of various feeding groups, and B/B + F (B and F are the proportions of bacterial and fungal-feeding nematodes) were found when soil surrounding sheep feces containing chlamydospores and parasitic nematode eggs was compared to soil surrounding feces containing parasitic nematode eggs alone. It is unlikely that the application of D. flagrans as a biological control agent against the free-living stages of nematode parasites of these livestock will negatively affect populations of nontarget soil nematodes.
    Biological Control - BIOL CONTROL. 01/2002; 23(1):64-70.
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    ABSTRACT: A dose and move to clean pasture strategy for nematode control in weaner sheep was compared to a move only strategy. Sixteen ewes with twin lambs (2-3 weeks old) were turned out on infected pasture on 4 May 1999. On 1 July, the lambs were allocated to four groups of eight and weaned on to clean pasture. Two groups (DM1+2) were treated with anthelmintics, while the other two (M1+2) were not treated. Each group was allocated to a separate paddock and set stocked until 27 September when all the animals were slaughtered to perform worm counts. Moving the weaned lambs to clean pasture reduced the faecal egg counts to less than one third within 4 weeks while the treatment reduced it to zero for 4 weeks. Faecal egg counts of the dose and move groups remained significantly lower for 6 weeks (P<0.0001) after moving to the clean pasture. After this period the differences were not significant as the dose and move groups started shedding eggs in faeces. The pasture infectivity was lower in the paddocks grazed by groups (DM1+2). The weight gains and the serum albumin levels were comparable in all four groups. O. circumcinta and Trichostrongylus vitrinus were the major species recovered. The total worm counts were significantly lower in (DM1+2) compared to M1+2, particularly the mean counts in the small intestines (T. vitrinus) (P<0.01). It was concluded that weaning lambs at the beginning of July and moving them before the expected mid-summer rise in herbage infection to a clean pasture will prevent parasitic gastroenteritis and achieve good production whether the move is accompanied by anthelmintic treatment or not. The effects will be subject to prevailing nematode species, local climatic conditions and length of the grazing season.
    Veterinary Parasitology 08/2001; 99(1):15-27. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasitism is a major constraint to production of goats in the southeastern United States. The conventional method of control used by producers in this region is frequent use of anthelmintics during the warm season. Overuse of anthelmintics has led to an increase in the incidence of anthelmintic resistance in many parts of the world, but data on prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in GIN of goats in the southeastern United States are very limited. To address this issue, anthelmintic efficacy was determined in goat herds at the Fort Valley State University, Agricultural Research Station (FVSU-ARS) and the University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine (UGA-CVM) using fecal egg count reduction (FECR) tests and DrenchRite((R)) larval development assays (LDA). At FVSU-ARS, 2-year-old Spanish goat does were randomly allocated to one of nine different treatment groups (n = 10): albendazole (ABZ; 20mg/kg body weight (BW)), fenbendazole (FBZ; 20mg/kg BW), ivermectin (IVM; 0.4 mg/kg BW), doramectin (DRM; 0.4 mg/kg BW), moxidectin (MOX; 0.4 mg/kg BW), levamisole (LEV; 12 mg/kg BW), morantel tartrate (MOR; 10mg/kg BW), a combination of IVM (0.4 mg/kg BW) and ABZ (20 mg/kg BW), and untreated controls. At UGA-CVM, goats were randomly allocated to one of five different treatment groups (n = 8): ABZ (20 mg/kg BW), IVM (0.4 mg/kg BW), MOX (0.4 mg/kg BW), LEV (12 mg/kg BW), and untreated controls. All drugs in both experiments were administered orally. Anthelmintic efficacy was calculated by comparing 14-day post-treatment FEC of treated and control animals, and percent reductions were interpreted using the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology guidelines for resistance. For the LDA, nematode eggs were isolated from pooled fecal samples of untreated control goats in each herd and used to perform DrenchRite((R)) assays. In the FVSU-ARS herd, MOX, LEV, the combination of IVM and ABZ, IVM, DRM, ABZ, MOR, and FBZ reduced FEC by 100, 91, 88, 78, 76, 62, 48, and 10%, respectively. In the UGA-CVM herd, MOX, LEV, ABZ and IVM, reduced FEC by 100, 94, 87, and 0%, respectively. In both herds moxidectin was the only drug tested that was fully effective. Results of the LDA were in agreement with results of the FECR tests for both herds. These data demonstrate the presence of GINs resistant to all three major anthelmintic classes in both goat herds.
    Veterinary Parasitology 07/2001; 97(4):261-8. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effect on the pasture contamination level with infective trichostrongylid larvae by feeding the nematode-trapping fungus, Duddingtonia flagrans at two dose levels to first time grazing calves was examined in Lithuania. Thirty heifer-calves, aged 3-6 months, were divided into three comparable groups, A, B and C. Each group was turned out on a 1.07 ha paddock (a, b and c). The paddocks were naturally contaminated with infective trichostrongylid larvae from infected cattle grazing the previous year. Fungal material was fed to the animals daily during a two month period starting 3 weeks after turnout. Groups A and B were given 10(6) and 2.5x10(5) chlamydospores per kg of live weight per day, respectively, while group C served as a non-dosed control group. Every two weeks the heifers were weighed and clinically inspected. On the same dates, faeces, blood and grass samples were collected. From mid-July onwards, the number of infective larvae in grass samples increased markedly (P<0.05)on paddock c, whereas low numbers of infective larvae were observed on paddocks a and b grazed by the fungus treated groups. However, the results indicate that administering fungal spores at a dose of 2.5x10(6)chlamydospores per kg live weight per day did not significantly prevent parasitism in calves, presumably due to insufficient suppression of developing infective larvae in the faeces. In contrast, a dose of 10(6) chlamydospores per kg lowered the parasite larval population on the pasture, reduced pepsinogen levels (P<0.05), and prevented calves from developing parasitosis.
    Journal of Helminthology 01/2001; 74(4):355-9. · 1.16 Impact Factor
  • M Faedo, M Larsen, S Thamsborg
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    ABSTRACT: Investigations were made into the timing of administration of Duddingtonia flagrans as a biological control agent against ovine parasitic nematodes including stongylid and Nematodirus spp. Faeces from 3-4 months old male lambs were deposited onto pasture plots that had never been grazed by sheep. The trial was conducted over two consecutive years (1998 and 1999). For both years, the following three plot types were involved: Sim plots had faeces containing nematode eggs and Duddingtonia flagrans spores deposited simultaneously; Post plots had faeces containing nematode eggs followed 2 weeks later by faeces containing D. flagrans spores alone; Control plots had faeces containing only nematode eggs; Prior plots (included in 1999) had faeces containing D. flagrans spores alone followed 2 weeks later by faeces containing nematode eggs. In each year, two deposition periods were involved: July and August in 1998 and June and July in 1999. During the first year pasture samples were collected at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after initial deposition. In 1999, additional samples were collected at 10, 16 and 20 weeks. Larvae were extracted from the pasture samples and counts performed to estimate the number and species of infective third-stage (L(3), larvae) present. The number of third-stage strongylid larvae on pasture was significantly lower on Sim plots compared to the remaining plot types for both years at all deposition times (P<0.001). This was also the case for the number of Nematodirus infective larvae in August deposition plots in 1998 (P<0. 02). There was no significant difference between treatments in both deposition times in 1999 and July deposition plots in 1998 for the Nematodirus data. These results suggest that D. flagrans, if deposited at the same time as parasite eggs prevents transmission of third-stage larvae from the faecal deposit onto pasture, including occasionally Nematodirus species, but does not have an effect on third-stage parasitic nematode larvae in the surrounding soil.
    Veterinary Parasitology 12/2000; 94(1-2):55-65. · 2.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans may be used in biological control of parasitic nematode larvae in faeces of domestic host animals after feeding the hosts with fungal chlamydospores. In this experiment a possible undesirable fungal impact on earthworms, of the species Aporrectodea longa, was investigated. As earthworms eat animal faeces, D. flagrans may come into contact with earthworms both in their alimentary tract and on their body surface. However during the experimental period of 20 days, when earthworms were living in soil and eating cattle faeces that were heavily infested with viable chlamydospores of D. flagrans there were no indications of internal or external mycosis among the earthworms.
    Acta veterinaria Scandinavica 02/2000; 41(2):147-51. · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An experiment was carried out in 1997 to test the efficacy of an isolate of the microfungus Duddingtonia flagrans against free-living stages of horse strongyles under conditions in the field and to assess the eventual effect of the fungus on the normal degradation of faeces. Faecal pats were made from faeces of a naturally strongyle infected horse, which had been fed fungal material at a dose level of 106 fungal unit/kg bwt. Control pats without fungi were made from faeces collected from the same animal just before being fed fungi. Faecal cultures set up for both groups of faeces to monitor the activity of the fungus under laboratory conditions showed that the fungus significantly reduced the number of infective third-stage larvae (L3) by an average of 98.4%. Five faecal pats from each batch of faeces were deposited on pasture plots at 3 times during spring-summer. The herbage around each pat was sampled fortnightly to recover L3 transmitted from faeces. The results showed that the herbage infectivity around fungus-treated pats was reduced by 85.8-99.4%. The remaining faecal material at the end of each sampling period was collected, and the surviving L3 were extracted. Significantly fewer larvae were recovered from the fungus-treated pats. Analysis of wet and dry weight of the collected pats, as well as their organic matter content, were performed to compare the degradation of faeces of both groups. The results indicated that the presence of the fungus did not alter the degradation of the faeces.
    Equine Veterinary Journal 12/1999; 31(6):488-91. · 2.29 Impact Factor