M D Williams

Birmingham Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, England, United Kingdom

Are you M D Williams?

Claim your profile

Publications (31)117.45 Total impact

  • Source
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 12/2010; 9(3):605-7. · 6.08 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent reports have suggested that the incidence of inhibitors in haemophilia is the highest in those first exposed to factor VIII under 6 months of age. In this study, we investigated inhibitor development in children first exposed to FVIII as neonates and also examined the effect of other genetic and environmental variables. Three hundred and forty-eight children with severe haemophilia A were investigated. Inhibitors developed in 68 of 348 (20%), with 34 of 348 (10%) high titre inhibitors. The incidence in relation to initial FVIII exposure was: <1 month nine of 35 (26%), 1-6 months 13 of 51 (25%), 6-12 months 27 of 130 (21%), 12-18 months 13 of 66 (20%) and >18 months six of 66 (9%). While we observed a significant difference in inhibitor development and age at first exposure across all age groups (P = 0.018), no significant difference was observed in children treated at different time points during the first year of life (P = 0.44). Similar results were obtained for high titre inhibitors. There was also no difference in the incidence of inhibitors in relation to initial FVIII exposure in a subgroup of 144 children with the intron 22 mutation. Inhibitors developed more frequently in those initially treated with recombinant when compared with plasma-derived FVIII (P = 0.006) and in those with a major molecular defect (P = 0.009). In this study, exposure to FVIII during the neonatal period was not associated with a higher incidence of inhibitors than those treated later during the first year of life. Initial treatment with recombinant FVIII and the presence of a major molecular defect were the most important variables affecting inhibitor development.
    Haemophilia 04/2007; 13(2):149-55. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • Haemophilia 04/2005; 11(2):186-7. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The rare coagulation disorders are heritable abnormalities of haemostasis that may present significant difficulties in diagnosis and management. This review summarizes the current literature for disorders of fibrinogen, and deficiencies of prothrombin, factor V, FV + VIII, FVII, FX, the combined vitamin K-dependent factors, FXI and FXIII. Based on both collective clinical experience and the literature, guidelines for management of bleeding complications are suggested with specific advice for surgery, spontaneous bleeding, management of pregnancy and the neonate. We have chosen to include a section on Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome because haematologists may be consulted about bleeding manifestations in such patients.
    Haemophilia 10/2004; 10(5):593-628. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: M3: doi:10.1111/j.1365-2516.2004.00944.x
    Haemophilia 01/2004; 10(5):593-628. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Three neonates with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are described. All three patients suffered an episode of massive acute haemolysis, in the absence of blood group incompatibilities, infection, or ingestion of oxidising agents known to trigger haemolysis. One patient died, but the other two survived after an exchange transfusion. This highlights that G6PD deficiency in the neonatal period may present with severe anaemia in association with hyperbilirubinaemia.
    Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition 12/2003; 88(6):F534-6. · 3.45 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The 3' end of the VWF gene was screened in the affected members of 3 different families with type 2A (phenotype IID) von Willebrand disease (vWD). Exons 49 to 52 of the VWF gene were amplified and screened for mutations by chemical cleavage mismatch detection. Mismatched bands were detected in exon 52 of 2 patients and in exon 51 of a third patient. Using direct DNA sequencing, a heterozygous G8562A transition leading to a Cys2008Tyr substitution was found in all the patients in family 1, and a T8561A transversion leading to a Cys2008Ser substitution was found in both patients from family 2. In a patient from a third family, an 8-base deletion from nucleotide 8437 to 8444 was identified in exon 51. The 2 mutations in exon 52 were reproduced by in vitro site-directed mutagenesis of full-length von Willebrand factor (vWF) cDNA and transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. The corresponding recombinant VWFs for these 2 mutations exhibited the typical aberrant vWF:Ag multimer pattern seen in the plasma of the patients. These 3 mutations demonstrate the importance of other carboxy-terminal cysteines in addition to the reported Cys2010 residue, in the normal dimerization of vWF, and their essential role in the assembly of normal multimeric vWF. (Blood. 2001;98:674-680)
    Blood 09/2001; 98(3):674-80. · 9.78 Impact Factor
  • Blood 08/2001; 98(1):248-50. · 9.78 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Haemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by reduced or absent FVIII (FVIII) protein caused by mutations in the FVIII gene. We have used Southern blotting and chemical mismatch analysis (CMA) to identify the mutations causing haemophilia A in 59 local or referred patients or carriers of haemophilia A. Southern blot analysis of 87 families with FVIII : C < 5% identified 31 as positive for the intron 22 inversion. Analysis of 19 of the inversion-negative families and a further nine families with mild or moderate haemophilia A by CMA resulted in the identification of a heterogeneous spectrum of mutations in the FVIII gene comprising 21 single base-pair substitutions and nine deletions. Seventeen of the base-pair substitutions are missense, two nonsense, and two are splice-site mutations. Two patients were found to have compound mutations with two mutations identified on a single X chromosome. Six of the point mutations and six of the deletions have not been reported previously in the haemophilia A mutation database. Unusually, a missense mutation, as well as deletion and splice-site mutations, was found to be associated with exon-skipping events.
    Haemophilia 08/2001; 7(4):381-91. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • S E Lawson, L Thompson, M D Williams
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The application of molecular biology to haematology has provided the opportunity to revisit previous diagnoses, many of which can now be redefined. This report is on a local family previously diagnosed and published as having X-linked thrombocytopenia in 1974, and shows how the application of molecular screening has confirmed the true diagnosis of Wiskott Aldrich syndrome.
    Clinical & Laboratory Haematology 01/2000; 21(6):397-9. · 1.11 Impact Factor
  • Source
    S E Lawson, D Butler, M S Enayat, M D Williams
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To identify the incidence of congenital thrombophilia in a cohort of children presenting with symptomatic thromboembolism. A review of children with thromboembolism investigated for thrombophilia over a 12 month period. Thirty children with thromboembolic episodes and 16 of their family members. MEASUREMENTS AND DATA COLLECTION: Data were collected on age at diagnosis, underlying diagnosis, site of thrombosis, associated precipitating factors, occurrence of other thromboembolic events, and family history. Investigations included measurement of protein C activity, total and free protein S antigen, antithrombin III activity, screening for factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210A, urinary homocysteine estimation, and a screen for lupus anticoagulant. Twenty seven of 30 patients had one or more risk factors present at the time of thromboembolism. Eighty three per cent had acquired precipitating factors present, and 43% had underlying congenital thrombophilia. There was a high incidence of congenital thrombophilia in this group of patients with symptomatic thromboembolism. These findings emphasise the importance of such defects in the pathogenesis of childhood thrombosis, and suggest that full thrombophilia investigations should be performed on all children presenting with thromboembolic disease.
    Archives of Disease in Childhood 09/1999; 81(2):176-8. · 3.05 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nutritional status and 'well-being' were compared prospectively in 39 children (mean age 8.1 years) who received nutritional support following bone marrow transplantion (BMT): 20 received enteral tube feeding (ETF; six received parenteral nutrition [PN] subsequently) and 19 with oral mucositis received PN (one received ETF subsequently). Poor nutritional status (height for age and/or weight for height and/or mid-arm circumference z-scores <-1) was present in 18 patients and was associated with a longer hospital stay (P = 0. 01). Both ETF and PN groups were comparable with respect to age, pretransplant nutritional status and conditioning regimens. No significant deterioration in anthropometric indices in either group occurred following BMT. However, significant correlations were found between the duration of ETF (and not PN) and improvements in nutritional status. Furthermore, PN was associated with more frequent exocrine pancreatic insufficiency than ETF (P = 0.001). Oral mucositis was associated with poorer 'well being' at the start of PN compared with ETF (P < 0.0001), but this was reversed by the end of PN. Bone marrow recovery, hospital stay and positive blood cultures were similar in the two groups. Hypomagnesaemia, hypophosphataemia and biochemical zinc deficiency were common in both groups but hypoalbuminaemia and biochemical selenium deficiency were worse in the PN group. In conclusion, both ETF and PN are effective in maintaining nutritional status post-BMT. When ETF is tolerated, it is associated with better nutritional response. With the existing ETF and PN regimens close monitoring of the trace element and mineral status is required.
    Clinical Nutrition 04/1998; 17(2):57-63. · 3.30 Impact Factor
  • Thrombosis and Haemostasis 11/1997; 78(4):1303. · 5.76 Impact Factor
  • T T Yee, M D Williams, F G Hill, C A Lee, K J Pasi
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Use of high purity and recombinant factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates has been thought to be associated with an increased incidence of FVIII inhibitors in patients with severe haemophilia A. Comparison with comparable historical control groups has suggested that the true incidence of inhibitors in patients with severe haemophilia A was approximately 20-25%, similar to the incidence seen with new high purity and recombinant FVIII products. We have conducted a study of inhibitor development in a cohort of 37 boys with severe haemophilia A (VIII:C <2 u/dl) exposed only to a single FVIII concentrate (BPL 8Y) with no previous blood or blood product exposure. This factor VIII concentrate is an intermediate purity product with a specific activity of approximately 2 IU/mg protein and contains well preserved von Willebrand factor multimers. It is manufactured by conventional fractionation technologies and terminally dry heat treated at 80 degrees C for 72 h.
    Thrombosis and Haemostasis 09/1997; 78(3):1027-9. · 5.76 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Nutritional insult after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is complex and its nutritional management challenging. Enteral nutrition is cheaper and easier to provide than parenteral nutrition, but its tolerance and effectiveness in reversing nutritional depletion after BMT is poorly defined. Nutritional status, wellbeing, and nutritional biochemistry were prospectively assessed in 21 children (mean age 7.5 years; 14 boys) who received nasogastric feeding after BMT (mean duration 17 days) and in eight children (mean age 8 years, four boys) who refused enteral nutrition and who received dietetic advice only. Enteral nutrition was stopped prematurely in eight patients. Greater changes in weight and mid upper arm circumference were observed in the enteral nutrition group, while positive correlations were found between the duration of feeds and increase in weight and in mid upper arm circumference. Vomiting and diarrhoea had a similar incidence in the two groups, while fever and positive blood cultures occurred more frequently in the dietetic advice group. Diarrhoea occurring during enteral nutrition was not associated with fat malabsorption, while carbohydrate malabsorption was associated with rotavirus infection only. Enteral feeding did not, however, affect bone marrow recovery, hospital stay, general wellbeing, or serum albumin concentrations. Hypomagnesaemia, hypophosphataemia, zinc and selenium deficiency were common in both groups. In conclusion, enteral nutrition, when tolerated, is effective in limiting nutritional insult after BMT. With existing regimens nutritional biochemistry should be closely monitored in order to provide supplements when required.
    Archives of Disease in Childhood 09/1997; 77(2):131-6. · 3.05 Impact Factor
  • M S Enayat, M D Williams, F G Hill
    Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis 05/1997; 8(3):205. · 1.25 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - J PEDIAT GASTROENTEROL NUTR. 01/1997; 24(4).
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The nature of the gastrointestinal injury following bone marrow transplantation and its clinical and nutritional sequelae are poorly defined. Prospective assessments of gastrointestinal function, nutritional status, and wellbeing were therefore carried out in 47 consecutive patients (28 males, 19 females; mean age 8.4 years) undergoing bone marrow transplant. 31 diarrhoeal episodes (median duration 9.5 days) occurred in 27 patients at a median of 10 days after transplantation. Ninety one per cent of episodes were associated with protein losing enteropathy. Protein losing enteropathy was more severe in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) comparing with other causes. It led to a substantial fall in serum albumin and there was a negative correlation between faecal alpha 1-antitrypsin concentrations and serum albumin. Transient pancreatic insufficiency developed in 18 patients, and pancreatitis in one. Intestinal permeability was normal in 12 patients who had no diarrhoea during the conditioning treatments. Diarrhoeal patients had a significantly greater decrease in nutritional status and wellbeing than patients without diarrhoea. Gastrointestinal injury following bone marrow transplantation is thus complex. Severe protein losing enteropathy in this context suggests the presence of GVHD.
    Archives of Disease in Childhood 10/1996; 75(3):208-13. · 3.05 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Following the emergence of biochemical zinc deficiency after bone marrow transplantation, the clinical value of plasma alkaline phosphatase activity as an early indicator of biochemical zinc depletion was investigated in this group of patients. Serial measurements of plasma zinc and alkaline phosphatase activities in 28 consecutive children (median age 8.7 years; 16 males) undergoing bone marrow transplantation were carried out and clinical associations recorded. A significant fall in plasma zinc occurred after the bone marrow transplant, and 19 children developed biochemical zinc deficiency (Zn < 11 mumol/l) at a median of 7 days following the transplant. Zinc depletion was more common in younger patients and in children with diarrhoea. A positive correlation was found between plasma zinc and alkaline phosphatase activities. Zinc depleted patients had more febrile episodes of longer duration and were more likely to have a positive blood culture. Haemopoetic recovery was not affected by zinc deficiency. Following zinc supplementation, alkaline phosphatase showed a significant increase. The sensitivity of a low alkaline phosphatase as a screening test for biochemical zinc deficiency was 83%, with a specificity of 86%. Low alkaline phosphatase activity following bone marrow transplant is an indication for zinc supplements.
    Archives of Disease in Childhood 04/1996; 74(4):328-31. · 3.05 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Blood 06/1995; 85(9):2639. · 9.78 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

678 Citations
117.45 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1988–2010
    • Birmingham Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
  • 1998
    • University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
  • 1994–1997
    • University of Birmingham
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom
  • 1990
    • Riley Hospital for Children
      Indianapolis, Indiana, United States