Y. I. Nissim

France Télécom, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

Are you Y. I. Nissim?

Claim your profile

Publications (35)59.29 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A low pressure VUV flashlamp at 100 Torr has been developed as a tool for ‘cold’ UV CVD and processing. The current density is related in a tunable fashion to the VUV spectral distribution (160–260 nm) up to 20 Hz. A high brightness (3400 W/Hz cm2 sr) Kr flashtube was shown to be a superior VUV source to Xe and Ar for Si-based dielectrics. The VUV efficiency of the Kr flashlamp, operated at up to 10 kA/cm2, is relatively high, up to 10%, in the spectral region. By setting four efficient Kr flashtubes, in a separate cavity, a lamp source, together with the UV CVD system characteristics, are shown useful to overall ‘cold’ processing, with focus on uniform large area, cleaning, and in situ deposition, up to 3% for 3″. The deposition rates are conveniently high, ∼100 Å/min at 350°C, but well controllable to obtain several dielectric thin films on III–V materials: silicon dioxide, nitridised silicon dioxide, and silicon nitride. Device quality electrical and optical features for III–V technology are demonstrated: a zero-hysteresis MIS-InP and as a proof of the passivation of GaAs surface, the MIS-GaAs capacitor.
    Applied Surface Science 01/1995; 86(1):286-293. · 2.54 Impact Factor
  • O. Dulac, Y.I. Nissim
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Silicon nitride films have been deposited on InP using a photochemical process. A high power krypton flash lamp was used to produce the direct photolysis of conventional reactive gases with the highest deposition rates ever reported in UVCVD (93 Å/min). Also, the high UV fluence allows a cold process and results in films with excellent structural and electrical properties
    Electronics Letters 05/1994; · 1.04 Impact Factor
  • Annales de Physique 01/1994; · 0.25 Impact Factor
  • O DULAC, Y NISSIM
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Passivation of III-V semiconductor surfaces and especially the GaAs surface has been studied for over two decades without significant breakthrought. However III-V device performances are still often limited by surface properties. In particular field effect behaviour in GaAs has been impossible to obtain due to the Fermi level pinning at the surface of this material. This paper presents an integrated sequence of low thermal budget processes to provide contamination control at the GaAs surface leading to very promising field effect on GaAs. In-situ surface cleaning using a Distributed Electron Cyclotron Resonance Microwave plasma (DECR MMP) has been integrated with a thin dielectric film deposition facility using light assisted CVD technics. Photoluminescence results carried out on GaAs surfaces have demonstrated that exposure to a hydrogen plasma induces lower recombination rates on these surfaces. Bulk diffusion of hydrogen during this process can be controlled and eliminated using an integrated Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA). Finally, in-situ encapsulation by a dielectric allows one to stabilize the electronic properties of the surface for passivation applications. A silicon nitride film deposited by a direct UV photolysis deposition process has been developed for this study and is presented here.
    Microelectronic Engineering - MICROELECTRON ENG. 01/1994; 25:265-275.
  • Olivier Dulac, Yves I. Nissim
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Passivation of III-V semiconductor surfaces and especially the GaAs surface has been studied for over two decades without significant breakthrough. However, III-V device performances are still often limited by surface properties. In particular field effect behaviour in GaAs has been impossible to obtain due to the Fermi level pinning at the surface of this material. This paper presents an integrated sequence of low thermal budget processes to provide contamination control at the GaAs surface leading to very promising field effect on GaAs.In-situ surface cleaning using a Distributed Electron Cyclotron Resonance Microwave plasma (DECR MMP) has been integrated with a thin dielectric film deposition facility using light assisted CVD technics. Photoluminescence results carried out on GaAs surfaces have demonstrated that exposure to a hydrogen plasma induces lower recombination rates on these surfaces. Bulk diffusion of hydrogen during this process can be controlled and eliminated using an integrated Rapid Thermal Annealing (RTA). Finally, in-situ encapsulation by a dielectric allows one to stabilize the electronic properties of the surface for passivation applications. A silicon nitride film deposited by a direct UV photolysis deposition process has been developed for this study and is presented here.
    MRS Proceedings. 12/1993; 342.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rapid thermal chemical vapour deposition is proposed to obtain optical-quality silicon nitride films on III–V semiconductors. The films have been obtained on InP at high temperature with a very high growth rate. Structural and morphological properties of nearly stoichiometric silicon nitride are presented. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the films are dense and have a uniform thickness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the surface morphology of the silicon nitride films is dependent on the thickness of the films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allowed us to image the dielectric surface and to obtain roughness values as a function of the experimental conditions of deposition. Refractive indices measured at 6328 Å are linearly dependent on the film thickness. We show that the refractive index in this case is also tightly connected to the surface morphology of the deposited thin film.
    Applied Surface Science - APPL SURF SCI. 01/1993; 69:198-203.
  • F. Lebland, C. Licoppe, Y. I. Nissim
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition was utilized to deposit silicon‐based dielectrics on III‐V materials at high temperature. Silicon oxynitride films can be deposited on InP at 750 °C with compositions varying between silicon dioxide and silicon nitride. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis measurements show that the oxygen concentration in the layers varies continuously with the oxidant gas flow rate. The overall stoichiometry of the films can be controlled with this parameter. The composition of the layers has a direct incidence on the mechanical tension of the insulator/semiconductor structures. A highly sensitive optical setup has been developed to measure the tension on these samples in order to determine the stoichiometry of the silicon oxynitride (SiO x N y ) film that leaves the structure unstressed. The stress‐free film composition is shown to depend also strongly on the thickness of the layer. A study of the overall stress introduced in a structure during its fabrication is presented.
    Journal of Applied Physics 11/1992; · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • F. Lebland, C. Licoppe, Y.I. Nissim
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was utilized to deposit silicon-based dielectric on InP at high temperature. Silicon oxynitride films can be deposited on InP at 750°C with deposition rates at high as 100 Å/s. The composition of the films can be varied continuously with the oxidant gas flow rate from silicon dioxide to silicon nitride. With this process the substate is not degraded and the films are of device quality. A highly sensitive optical set-up has been developed to measure the tension in a dielectric P/In structure and thus to determine the stoichiometry of the SiO<sub>x</sub>N<sub>y</sub> film which leaves the structure unstressed
    Indium Phosphide and Related Materials, 1992., Fourth International Conference on; 05/1992
  • C Licoppe, YI Nissim, JM Moison
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Local surface chemistry and nonlocal deposition modes in the photodeposition of silica films from silane and oxygen mixtures have been studied by surface-sensitive infrared vibrational spectroscopy. The two-step surface reaction leading to the photoinduced chemisorption of silane and oxygen is identified. Dynamic roughening of the growth front is shown to occur with a characteristic exponent beta of 0.34+/-0.05, fitting the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 04/1992; 45(11):6275-6278. · 3.77 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The interface between InP covered by its native oxide and SiO2 is built up the thermal or UV-assisted chemical vapour deposition from silane precursor gas. It is analyzed in situ by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy in an ultra-high-vacuum environment and by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a low-pressure deposition reactor. Both techniques indicate that the two processes lead to a grossly similar interface InPSiOSi⋯ involving the reduction of native oxides. However, significant differences are observed concerning the state of oxidation of silicon, the presence of hydrogen, and the morphology of the interfacial layer. Results are discussed in an interface engineering perspective.
    Applied Surface Science 01/1992; s 56–58:789–794. · 2.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Rapid thermal CVD was utilized to deposit SiOxNy layers on III–V materials. The deposition rate and the stoichiometry of the films are controlled by the N2O partial pressure and the temperature. Deposition rates as high as 100 Å/s can be obtained at 750°C for which the InP substrate is not degraded. The use of N2O as an adjustable reactant gas allows us to control the stoichiometry of the film by varying the O concentration while the Si and N concentration remain unchanged. This effect may be explained by the dissociation of nitrogen protoxide into oxygen which is directly incorporated in the films and nitrogen in excess in the reaction chamber which increase the dilution. The use of nitrogen protoxide has allowed us to obtain continously all compositions between SiO2 and Si3N4 with indexes of refraction varying between 1.45 and 2.2 Applications to guiding devices are discussed.
    Applied Surface Science 01/1992; 54:125–129. · 2.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Epitaxial silicon layers are grown on GaAs substrates in a light‐assisted cold wall horizontal reactor. High quality silicon is obtained at the surface when the growth is conducted in a two‐step sequence. The first step is a silane exposure at 700 °C where epitaxial silicon starts to grow and where tensile stress relaxes to form a highly defective layer. The second step is an epitaxial growth of silicon at 800 °C. The crystalline perfection and stress in both the layer and the substrate are characterized by Raman scattering. Cross‐section transmission electron microscopy analysis shows mainly the formation of stacking faults at the interface. Their number reduces as the Si film thickness increases. The rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition does not require arsenic overpressure to protect the GaAs substrate from thermal degradation during epitaxial growth.
    Applied Physics Letters 09/1991; · 3.79 Impact Factor
  • Proc SPIE 04/1991;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A combination of ultraviolet and infrared lamps is used to obtain the growth of SiO 2 on InP substrates at low temperature under rapid thermal processing conditions. Thorough infrared spectroscopy characterization of the dielectric layers shows that the ultraviolet‐assisted growth process without mercury sensitization leads to good quality silica interspersed with oxygen‐deficient inclusions. Rapid annealing improves them so as to be suitable for InP‐based field‐effect devices, with interface trap density around 5×10<sup>11</sup> cm<sup>-2</sup>. A study of the interface trap density made with this technique shows the relevance of fast thermal processing, even at low growth temperatures, for the improvement of these devices.
    Journal of Applied Physics 01/1991; · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We have studied the early stages of the photodeposition of SiO2 on semiconductors from silane–oxygen gaseous mixtures under UV irradiation. For film thicknesses below 100 A˚, the films exhibit a specific oxygen-deficient composition which become stoichiometric if deposition lasts longer, producing SiO2 films with a homogeneous composition throughout the whole dielectric layer. It is shown that the transitory early deposition regime is structurally sensitive to the nature of the substrate. Cathodoluminescence is used to show that the surface carrier recombination properties are altered mostly during this singular early stage of photodeposition.
    Applied Physics Letters 01/1991; 59:43-45. · 3.79 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Surface-sensitive multiple internal reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy has been applied to the study of the growth of SiO2 films under far ultraviolet illumination. Spectra provide evidence for a previously unreported Si-H absorption peak occurring at 2208 cm-1. It is shown that this line characterizes the molecular structure of the photochemisorption site of silane and that this phenomenon occurs on sites including hydroxyl groups which are also produced in a photochemical gas-solid process. In the first step of silane photochemisorption, photoexcitation occurs on the surface while in the oxidization step, photoexcitation of oxygen molecules is an active process in the gas phase.
    Applied Surface Science 01/1991; · 2.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: New chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes controlled by light irradiation are studied and applied to III–V semiconductor device technology. The interactions between the incident photons and the gas-substrate system are either photolytic (UV lamps) or pyrolytic (IR lamps). In the first case the process is cold and in the second one it produces fast thermal ramping. The technique is thus compatible in both cases with the fragile semiconductor substrate and it allows in-situ processing. We report here a set of results involving surface and interface studies in order to prepare the deposition of thin-film materials, thin dielectric film deposition using “flash” CVD or UVCVD, and the first attempts to deposit semiconductors and metals using the same “flash” CVD techniques. the aim of this work is to propose alternative technologies for III–V semiconductors.
    Applied Surface Science. 01/1990;
  • Vacuum. 01/1990; 41:718-719.
  • J. M. Moison, Y. I. Nissim, C. Licoppe
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The complete reduction of oxides on the chemically polished surface of (100)InP has been obtained by exposure at 300 °C to low‐pressure ammonia. The whole process was monitored by various surface techniques. In a first step, exposure to ammonia removes the weakly bonded oxygen atoms and stabilizes the one‐monolayer oxide, i.e., turns the initial wet oxide to a thinner, well‐defined, and more stable oxide, which should prove to be a better base for further processing. Excitation of the ammonia gas by an ion gauge, i.e., use of highly active radicals, is necessary for the second step, where the oxygen atoms strongly bonded to InP are finally completely removed. The final surface is free of all contaminants and of nitrogen, its crystal structure displays a 4×1 reconstruction, and its Fermi level is pinned at 0.8 eV above the top of the valence band, i.e., 0.2 eV lower than on the clean InP surface. It is mostly InP covered by adsorbed hydrogen, with a small coverage of indium atoms liberated by the reduction of the native oxides and grouped as metallic clusters.
    Journal of Applied Physics 11/1989; · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • Proc SPIE 05/1989;