K F Leinfelder

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, United States

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Publications (135)182.78 Total impact

  • K F Leinfelder
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 07/2001; 132(6):782-3. · 1.82 Impact Factor
  • K F Leinfelder, A V Ritter
    Dentistry today 05/2001; 20(4):72-9.
  • K F Leinfelder, D A Little
    Compendium of continuing education in dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J.: 1995) 04/2001; 22(3):266-8, 270, 272.
  • K F Leinfelder, S Kurdziolek
    Dentistry today 02/2001; 20(1):36-8, 40-3.
  • K F Leinfelder
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 02/2001; 132(1):46-7. · 1.82 Impact Factor
  • S Kurdziolek, K F Leinfelder, A Delahaye
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    ABSTRACT: Although porcelain has predictably served the dental profession for more than 200 years, this class of restorative material has presented a number of clinically undesirable characteristics. As a result, during the past several years, major efforts have been made to enhance the mechanical and physical characteristics of polymers to better mimic porcelain for specific clinical applications. In recent years, Bis-GMA/barium-glass polymer systems have been developed to offer dental professionals a versatile restorative alternative to porcelain. This article details the material properties and clinical characteristics of one such system for the esthetic restoration of anterior and posterior teeth.
    Compendium of continuing education in dentistry (Jamesburg, N.J.: 1995) 01/2001; 21(12):1031-4, 1036, 1038; quiz 1040.
  • S M Kurdziolek, K F Leinfelder
    Dentistry today 11/2000; 19(10):100-2, 104-5.
  • K F Leinfelder
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 09/2000; 131(8):1185. · 1.82 Impact Factor
  • Source
    K F Leinfelder
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Dental procedures play a vital role in the modern dental practice. Considerable research has addressed improvements in the properties of dental porcelains. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: This article examines the trends in the scientific advances in dental porcelains. It highlights properties of the new low-fusing porcelains and describes indications for their use. New luting cements also are addressed.
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 07/2000; 131 Suppl:47S-51S. · 1.82 Impact Factor
  • K F Leinfelder
    Dentistry today 04/2000; 19(3):58-61.
  • Source
    K F Leinfelder, S Suzuki
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    ABSTRACT: An in vitro device has been developed to predict the long-term clinical performance of posterior composite resins. In contrast to most systems, it is based on three-bodied wear--the type of wear generated by food bolus during mastication. The authors wear-tested two groups of materials that included posterior composite resins, a castable ceramic, an amalgam and an unsalinated composite resin. After the wear-testing device concluded 400,000 cycles, the authors evaluated replicas of restoration surfaces for material loss. They used scanning electron microscopy to determine the mechanism of wear. The authors detected considerable differences in wear among the various materials included in the study. All of the differences, however, fell within the range of results obtained from the positive and negative controls (unsilanated composite resin and ceramic, respectively). A comparison of the in vitro wear values with the wear values obtained from a series of ongoing clinical studies at the same institution revealed a high level of agreement. Furthermore, replicas of the laboratory-tested composite resin samples revealed the same wear patterns as those generated from clinical restorations. The variation coefficients for the in vitro data generally did not exceed 5 percent, whereas those for the clinical data commonly averaged 20 percent. Based on the results of this study, the authors conclude that the in vitro testing device is reliably capable of predicting long-term clinical wear values. The results obtained after 92 hours of wear testing correlated closely with those obtained after three years of clinical testing. Long-term clinical studies are both time-consuming and expensive. Reliable in vitro wear-testing techniques allow manufacturers to develop or modify composite resin systems in considerably shorter periods.
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 10/1999; 130(9):1347-53. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To compare the clinical performance of four commercial ultraviolet light-cured composite materials, and to evaluate curing-system effects on long-term wear resistance of Class I and II restorations.Materials and Methods: Approximately 32 samples of each of four different ultraviolet light-cured composites (n = 130) were inserted into conventional Class I and I1 cavity preparations by two clinicians. Cavosurface margins of the preparations were not beveled. Enamel walls of the preparation were etched, and the respective bonding agent was applied. Each restoration was evaluated by two clinicians at 5, 10, and 17 years. Direct evaluations were performed using modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Indirect evaluations were performed using the Leinfelder cast evaluation method.Results: After 17 years, 65% of the restorations were recalled and pooled direct evaluations were conducted for color matching (94% alfa), marginal discoloration (100% alfa), marginal integrity (100% alfa), secondary caries (92% alfa), surface texture (72% alfa), and anatomic form (22% alfa). Mean occlusal wear from indirect evaluations at 5, 10, and 17 years was 197 ± 85 pm, 235 ± 72 μm, and 264 ± 80 μm, respectively. For direct and indirect evaluations there were significant differences (p±.05) between the baseline and 5-year recall evaluations.
    Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry 04/1999; 11(3):135 - 142. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • K F Leinfelder
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 03/1999; 130(2):252-4. · 1.82 Impact Factor
  • K F Leinfelder, S C Bayne, E J Swift
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    ABSTRACT: New composites, called packable or condensable composites, are being promoted as amalgam alternatives. The purposes of this review article are to identify these products, define new terminology associated with them, summarize the advertised properties for the materials, discuss the ideal properties for packable composites, review the properties of the major products, and critically evaluate the proposed handling procedures for these materials. The term packable is preferable to condensable for describing this new class of materials. All materials should be considered amalgam alternatives, not amalgam substitutes. The compositions and physical properties reported by manufacturers reveal that none of the materials represents a remarkable improvement over the properties of more traditional universal composites. The designs of Solitaire (Heraeus Kulzer), ALERT (Jeneric-Pentron), and SureFil (Dentsply/Caulk) are discussed in detail. The distinguishing characteristics of all packable compositions are less stickiness or stiffer viscosity than conventional composites, which allow them to be placed in a manner that somewhat resembles amalgam placement. Packable composites may allow more convenient placement in posterior sites and may offer some technique advantages over conventional composites. However, there is no evidence that their clinical properties are consistently better than those of conventional universal composites. Packable composites may be selected as alternatives to amalgam or conventional universal composites, but they are not equal to or better than dental amalgam in all respects. Also, in most cases, mechanical properties of packable composites are not substantially better than those of most conventional universal composites.
    Journal of esthetic dentistry 02/1999; 11(5):234-49.
  • A D Wilder, K N May, S C Bayne, D F Taylor, K F Leinfelder
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare the clinical performance of four commercial ultraviolet light-cured composite materials, and to evaluate curing-system effects on long-term wear resistance of Class I and II restorations. Approximately 32 samples of each of four different ultraviolet light-cured composites (n = 130) were inserted into conventional Class I and II cavity preparations by two clinicians. Cavosurface margins of the preparations were not beveled. Enamel walls of the preparation were etched, and the respective bonding agent was applied. Each restoration was evaluated by two clinicians at 5, 10, and 17 years. Direct evaluations were performed using modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Indirect evaluations were performed using the Leinfelder cast evaluation method. After 17 years, 65% of the restorations were recalled and pooled direct evaluations were conducted for color matching (94% alfa), marginal discoloration (100% alfa), marginal integrity (100% alfa), secondary caries (92% alfa), surface texture (72% alfa), and anatomic form (22% alfa). Mean occlusal wear from indirect evaluations at 5, 10, and 17 years was 197 +/- 85 microns, 235 +/- 72 microns, and 264 +/- 80 microns, respectively. For direct and indirect evaluations there were significant differences (p < or = .05) between the baseline and 5-year recall evaluations. This study demonstrated that the mean pooled occlusal wear of four ultraviolet light-cured posterior composites at 17 years was 264 microns (approximately 0.25 mm), and that most wear (75%) occurred in the first 5 years. Of all recalled restorations, 76% were judged clinically acceptable at 17 years, and 22% of those exhibited no clinically detectable wear.
    Journal of esthetic dentistry 01/1999; 11(3):135-42.
  • Source
    K F Leinfelder
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Efforts have been made during the last several years to develop polymer formulations that could replace ceramic materials for the restoration of occlusal surfaces. In most cases, resins have exhibited insufficient wear resistance, whereas the ceramic materials have had a history of excessively abrading whatever opposes them occlusally. Based on recent clinical information, it appears that major successes have been achieved in reaching the goal. The author discusses these advances and proposes a possible replacement for amalgam, based on new technology.
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 06/1997; 128(5):573-81. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    K F Leinfelder
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    ABSTRACT: Dental casting alloys have played a major role in the restorative process for three-quarters of a century. Gold-based compositions were used almost exclusively for most of that time-but because of their relatively high cost, they began to be replaced by a number of base metal alloys. This article discusses some of the most recent findings about the composition of alloy systems and the possible tissue responses to those systems.
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 02/1997; 128(1):37-45. · 1.82 Impact Factor
  • Source
    K F Leinfelder
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Composite resins have changed the nature of dental restorations. However, many dentists have not altered their cavity preparation process, relying largely on the same procedure used for amalgam restorations. The author proposes a more conservative procedure, retaining more sound tooth structure, for placing posterior composite resin restorations.
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 07/1996; 127(6):743-8. · 1.82 Impact Factor
  • S Suzuki, J W Osborne, K F Leinfelder
    Journal of esthetic dentistry 02/1996; 8(6):263-8.
  • S L Wendt, T L Ziemiecki, K F Leinfelder
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate restorations, previously placed in clinical trials, for the rate of wear of the proximal surfaces, by tooth position. Seventy resin composite restorations were evaluated in bicuspids and molars. Fifty restorations were direct placement restorations and 20 were indirect placement restorations. Thirty-five bicuspids and 35 molars were evaluated for proximal wear rate. All restorations were opposing unrestored enamel proximal surfaces. Ten enamel to enamel proximal surfaces were chosen as controls. At baseline, contacts were judged to be closed visually and with thin, unwaxed dental floss. Impressions were taken at baseline and after 6, 12 and 24 months for the fabrication of models. Measurements for proximal wear, as determined by a loss of space between indexed transfer copings, were made under a zoom stereomicroscope by two independent evaluators. A parametric ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls, and log curve fit were applied to the data. When all data were pooled regardless of material, there were no significant differences (P < 0.05) in wear values for 1st and 2nd bicuspids and 1st and 2nd molars. Wear rates showed a high correlation (log curve fit R2 > 0.950) regardless of actual amount of wear. Regardless of composites examined, there were no differences in the amount of proximal wear with regard to tooth position in the arch.
    Journal of Dentistry 01/1996; 24(1-2):33-9. · 3.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
182.78 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1986–2001
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • • Division of Biomaterials
      • • School of Dentistry
      Birmingham, AL, United States
  • 1975–2001
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • • School of Dentistry
      • • Department of Operative Dentistry
      Chapel Hill, NC, United States
  • 2000
    • New York University College of Dentistry
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1993–1996
    • Osaka University
      Suika, Ōsaka, Japan
    • Georgia Health Sciences University
      • College of Dental Medicine
      Augusta, GA, United States
  • 1994–1995
    • The Nippon Dental University
      • Department of Operative Dentistry
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
  • 1992
    • University of Connecticut
      • School of Dental Medicine
      Mansfield City, CT, United States
    • King Saud University
      Ar Riyāḑ, Ar Riyāḑ, Saudi Arabia
  • 1990
    • West Virginia University
      • School of Dentistry
      Morgantown, WV, United States
  • 1986–1989
    • University of Alabama
      Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States
  • 1969
    • Marquette University
      Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States