José Gómez-Codina

Hospital Universitari i Politècnic la Fe, Valenza, Valencia, Spain

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Publications (33)133.34 Total impact

  • O Juan, J Vidal, R Gisbert, J Muñoz, S Maciá, J Gómez-Codina
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the association in the change of circulating tumor cell (CTC) levels and clinical outcomes (PFS and OS) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated homogenously with docetaxel and gemcitabine administered every 2 weeks. We prospectively evaluated 37 patients for CTC levels at baseline and after 2 months of chemotherapy (before third cycle). Detection was carried out with the CellSearch system. Nine of the 37 patients (24 %) had ≥2 CTCs at the baseline determination. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.3 months (95 % CI 2.5-8.3) for patients with CTC 0-1 as compared to 9.4 months (95 % CI 1.2-12.2) for those with CTC ≥2 (p = 0.3506). Median overall survival (OS) was 8.1 (95 % CI 2.8-16.3) and 12.2 (95 % CI 1.4-12.2) months for patients with 0-1 CTCs and ≥2 CTCs, respectively (p = 0.7639). Patients with a second CTC quantification were classified as: group 1, CTC = 0-1 at baseline and CTC = 0-1 after second chemotherapy cycle (18 patients); group 2, CTC ≥2 at baseline and CTC = 0-1 after second determination (5 patients). Median PFS was 7.7 and 9.9 months for group 1 and group 2, respectively (p = 0.4467). CTCs ≥2 at baseline were detected only in 24 % of this group of patients with advanced NSCLC and poor performance status. No significant differences in PFS and OS between patients with or without CTCs at baseline were observed.
    Clinical and Translational Oncology 11/2013; · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: There is a need for biomarkers that may help in selecting the most effective anticancer treatments for each patient. We have investigated the prognostic value of a set of angiogenesis, inflammation and coagulation markers in patients treated for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 60 patients before first line platinum-based chemotherapy ± bevacizumab, and after the third cycle of treatment. Blood samples from 60 healthy volunteers were also obtained as controls. Angiogenesis, inflammation and coagulation markers vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), their soluble receptors 1 (VEGFR1) and 2 (VEGFR2), thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), interleukin-6 (IL6), sialic acid (SA) and tissue factor (TF) were quantified by ELISA. RESULTS: Except for TSP-1, pre- and post-treatment levels of all markers were higher in patients than in controls (p < 0.05). There was a positive and significant correlation between VEGF and VEGFR2 before treatment. VEGF also correlated with inflammatory markers IL-6 and SA. Moreover, there was a positive and significant correlation between levels of VEGFR1 and TF. Decreased levels of TSP-1 and increased levels of VEGF were associated with shorter survival. Bevacizumab significantly modified angiogenesis parameters and caused a decrease of VEGF and an increase of TSP-1. CONCLUSION: Angiogenesis, inflammation and coagulation markers were increased in NSCLC patients. Increased levels of VEGF and low levels of TSP-1 correlated with a poor prognosis.
    Clinical and Translational Oncology 03/2013; · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PurposeThis study investigated the association of CGA variables with function and survival in elderly lung cancer patients.Patients and methodsWe prospectively included 83 consecutive elderly patients with lung cancer who were seen at the outpatient oncology unit at the Hospital Lluis Alcanyis. The patients completed a geriatric assessment tool to measure functional status, comorbidity, cognitive function, psychological state, social support and nutritional status. The correlations of oncological and geriatric variables with survival were determined.ResultsThe median patient age was 77 years, and the mean number of comorbidities was 3. The measures of dependency were 48.2% for ADL and 69.9% for IADL. PS (p < 0.001), IADL dependency (p < 0.001), dementia (p < 0.001), depression (p < 0.001), weight loss, hypoalbuminemia, delirium and incontinence were independently associated with survival. Frail patients exhibited poorer survival (mean: 18.5 months vs. 9.1 months), but this difference was statistically not significant (p = 0.07).Conclusions Geriatric assessment detects more information than oncological evaluation alone. Factors related to survival may assist in the classification of elderly lung cancer patients.
    Journal of Geriatric Oncology 04/2012; 3(2):98–103. · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung cancer chemotherapy decisions in patients ≥ 70 years old are complex because of toxicity, comorbidity and the limited data on patient preferences. We examined the relationships between preferences and chemotherapy use in this group of patients. We used a questionnaire describing four hypothetical lung cancer treatment options. Eighty-three elderly (≥ 70 years old) lung cancer patients were informed about their diagnosis and therapeutic choices and then asked to choose one of the four options. Patients had previously been included in a prospective study to explore geriatric evaluation in an oncology unit and all had given written informed consent. Older patients (n=83) diagnosed with lung cancer (non-small- and small-cell lung cancer) from January 2006 to February 2008 were recruited from a single centre. The mean patient age was 77 years (range: 70-91). Eighty-one patients (97.6%) were men. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was the diagnosis in 63 patients (76%). Most patients selected active treatment (38.6% most survival benefit, 18% less survival benefit) and 31.3% selected no active treatment. Elderly lung cancer patients were significantly more likely to accept aggressive treatments despite high reported toxicities. Although most of the patients were symptomatic at diagnosis, the "symptom relief" option was chosen less frequently than the options that could prolong survival. Factors significantly related to patients' attitude toward chemotherapy were age (p<0.001), frailty (p=0.0039), depression and poor performance status (PS). Elderly lung cancer patients want to be involved in the decision-making process. Survival was the main treatment objective for more than half of the patients in this study. We have not found other published studies about elderly lung cancer patients' decisions about chemotherapy.
    Clinical and Translational Oncology 03/2012; 14(3):183-9. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Circulating endothelial cells and microparticles have prognostic value in cancer, and might be predictors of response to chemotherapy and antiangiogenic treatments. We have investigated the prognostic value of circulating endothelial cells and microparticles in patients treated for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 60 patients before first line, platinum-based chemotherapy +/- bevacizumab, and after the third cycle of treatment. Blood samples from 60 healthy volunteers were also obtained as controls. Circulating endothelial cells were measured by an immunomagnetic technique and immunofluorescence microscopy. Phosphatidylserine-positive microparticles were evaluated by flow cytometry. Microparticle-mediated procoagulant activity was measured by the endogen thrombin generation assay. pre- and posttreatment levels of markers were higher in patients than in controls (p<0.0001). Elevated levels of microparticles were associated with longer survival. Elevated pretreatment levels of circulating endothelial cells were associated with shorter survival. Circulating levels of microparticles and circulating endothelial cells correlate with prognosis, and could be useful as prognostic markers in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(10):e47365. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mean age of patients with lung cancer rises as a result of increasing life expectancy. So, the proportion of patients with serious comorbidity also increases [1,2]. Lung cancer treatment is characterized by a narrow therapeutic index. When life expectancy is short and therapeutic benefit is limited, it is of paramount importance to know the specific cause of death. Comorbidity is understood as a competing cause of death, and is the main exclusion criterion for lung cancer clinical trials. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of comorbidity in elderly lung cancer patients seen in an outpatient oncology department and to determine its correlation with survival. Between January 2006 and February 2008, 83 untreated lung cancer patients over the age of 70 years were enrolled in the study. Comorbidity was evaluated according to the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) [3] and the simplified comorbidity score (SCS) [4]. 83 patients (97.6% men, mean age 77 years) were studied. Comorbidities: tobacco consumption (94.6%), cardiovascular diseases (65%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (59%). Mean CCI was 3 (range 0-9). Mean SCS was 9 (range 4-19), and 47% of patients had an SCS>9. Comorbidity was fairly well correlated with age, ADL, IADL, and stage. Neither the CCI nor the SCS was related to survival (p: 0.47 and p: 0.24, log rank, respectively). Median survival was 326 days (95% CI, 259-393 days; or 10.8 months, 95% CI 8.6-13.1 months). Main cause of death was lung cancer disease progression (69.5%, 57 patients), with 20 patients (25%) dying of other non-neoplastic causes. Stage was significantly associated with survival (log rank: p<0.001). Although there was a high prevalence of comorbidity in our population, comorbidity was not related to survival. Comorbidity is one of the main reasons for undertreatment of elderly lung cancer patients, but this study indicates that this undertreatment may not be warranted given that those comorbidities may not cause a patient's death. Our data generated more of a hypothesis than a conclusion. Comorbidity should be an impetus for treatment design instead of an exclusion criterion for oncologic treatment.
    Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 04/2011; 72(1):108-13. · 3.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our goal was to describe the clinical, histological, and epidemiological characteristics of lung cancer diagnoses in people ≥70 years of age. Information on patients diagnosed with lung cancer from January 2006 to February 2008 was prospectively collected from the outpatient oncology department at a regional hospital. A total of 83 patients (97.6% men; mean age 77 years) were studied. There was a higher ratio of men to women than that reported in younger populations. Mean age was higher than that reported for randomized studies: 65.1% were ≥75 years old. Patients >80 years constituted 28.9% of the study population. Most patients (96.4%) had a history of smoking; they were predominantly former smokers (72.5% vs. 27.5%). The most common histological types were squamous cell (61.3%) and small cell (14.5%) carcinoma. Metastasis was present in 36.1% of patients. Stage was significantly associated with survival (logrank p < 0.001). There was no association between age and survival. Squamous cell lung cancer was associated with a better survival (p = 0.003). Elderly lung cancer patients who attended clinical practice were older than those included in prospective studies. The predominance of men and squamous cell carcinoma is associated with a smoking history. The epidemiological and histological patterns of younger patients have changed, possibly in relation to changes in smoking habits. The translation of these changes to elderly patients will be evidenced in the future. Only prospective epidemiologic studies will determine whether smoking habits are changing epidemiology in elderly lung cancer patients.
    Clinical and Translational Oncology 10/2010; 12(10):686-91. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: New treatments have recently been introduced for treating non-small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapeutic agents, such as pemetrexed, and targeted therapies, such as bevacizumab, erlotinib or gefitinib, have extended treatment options for selected histological subgroups. Antiangiogenic treatments, either associated with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs or given alone as maintenance therapy, constitute an active clinical research field. However, not all lung cancer patients benefit from antiangiogenic compounds. Moreover, tumour response assessment is often difficult when using these drugs, since targeted therapies generally do not cause rapid and measurable tumour shrinkage but, rather, long stabilisations and slight density changes on imaging tests. The finding of clinical or biological factors that might identify patients who will better benefit from these treatments, as well as identifying surrogate markers of tumour response and prognosis, is an issue of great interest. In that sense, different research lines have investigated the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) pathways. Circulating endothelial (CECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (CEPCs) are of prognostic value in different types of cancers, and relevant data are published about their potential usefulness as predictors of response to chemotherapy and antiangiogenic treatments. In this review, we discuss the data available on the role of CECs and CEPCs as prognostic factors and as surrogate markers of treatment response in non-small-cell lung cancer.
    Clinical and Translational Oncology 08/2010; 12(8):521-5. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A retrospective analysis based on the Spanish Lung Cancer Group (SLCG) clinical trial of high-dose epirubicin/cisplatin in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) was performed. Patients younger than 70 years vs. older than 70 years old were analyzed to evaluate the influence of age on response to treatment, toxicity, time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) of the chemotherapy schedule. Three hundred and thirty eight patients <70 years and sixty-four >70 years, were analyzed. Objective responses were similar in both groups. In patients less than 70 years higher TTP (36 weeks vs. 32 weeks) and OS (47 weeks vs. 42 weeks) were seen, attributable to the improved results observed in the subgroup of patients with limited disease (LD). No significant differences were observed when toxicity profile of both groups was compared, except for a higher rate of febrile neutropenia observed in the elderly group with extensive disease (4.6% vs. 8.8%, p=0.01). In the subgroup of patients with LD, elderly patients received less total cisplatin dose (401 vs. 508 mg/m(2), p=0.01) although less treatment delays were reported (10 days vs. 15 days, p=0.05). Age was likely to be a negative prognostic factor for OS of elderly patients with LD. It also seemed to be related to a greater dose reduction, which may explain that toxic episodes and delays occurred more frequently in the younger patients receiving the full scheduled dose. However, the definitive reason to explain this could not be established due to the characteristics of our analysis.
    Lung Cancer 06/2008; 63(1):83-7. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionLittle has been published regarding clinical predictors of severe toxicity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with combination chemotherapy (CT) with oxaliplatin and/or irinotecan. Material and MethodsWe analyzed retrospectively 142 patients treated between 1996 and 2004 in our center with these regimes with regards to grade 3–4 toxicity and overall survival (OS) rates. Köhne's prognostic classification could be applied in all patients. ResultsKöhne classification: good (54.2%), intermediate (26.8%), and poor prognosis (19%). 50.4% received irinotecan-based CT. Median number of cycles 6 with a total response rate of 38.9%. 23.2% stopped first-line CT due to toxicity. 50.7% suffered grade 3–4 toxicity: digestive (28.2%), hematologic (19.7%), and fatigue (25.4%). 7.7% episodes of neutropenic fever with 4.9% toxic deaths. 70.9% of grade 3–4 episodes occurred in the first four cycles. Median follow-up of 33.9 mo; median OS of 15.9 mo. For Köhne classification: good (20 mo), intermediate (15.8 mo), and poor (6.8 mo). Toxicity analysis: female sex and age>70 yr predicted higher overall grade 3–4 toxicity, with no differences in CT efficacy; age>70 yr and PS>1 predicted higher grade 3–4 fatigue. No relationship could be found between baseline laboratory characteristics and higher toxicity, except baseline hemoglobin and grade 3–4 hematologic toxicity. ConclusionsFemale and elderly patients have a higher grade 3–4 toxicity rate when treated with combination CT with oxaliplatin or irinotecan. Prognostic classifications such as Köhne's can help differentiate subgroups of patients who benefit little with the use of combination CT.
    Medical Oncology 08/2006; 23(3):347-357. · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little has been published regarding clinical predictors of severe toxicity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with combination chemotherapy (CT) with oxaliplatin and/or irinotecan. We analyzed retrospectively 142 patients treated between 1996 and 2004 in our center with these regimes with regards to grade 3-4 toxicity and overall survival (OS) rates. Köhne's prognostic classification could be applied in all patients. Köhne classification: good (54.2%), intermediate (26.8%), and poor prognosis (19%). 50.4% received irinotecan-based CT. Median number of cycles 6 with a total response rate of 38.9%. 23.2% stopped first-line CT due to toxicity. 50.7% suffered grade 3-4 toxicity: digestive (28.2%), hematologic (19.7%), and fatigue (25.4%). 7.7% episodes of neutropenic fever with 4.9% toxic deaths. 70.9% of grade 3-4 episodes occurred in the first four cycles. Median follow-up of 33.9 mo; median OS of 15.9 mo. For Köhne classification: good (20 mo), intermediate (15.8 mo), and poor (6.8 mo). Toxicity analysis: female sex and age > 70 yr predicted higher overall grade 3-4 toxicity, with no differences in CT efficacy; age > 70 yr and PS > 1 predicted higher grade 3-4 fatigue. No relationship could be found between baseline laboratory characteristics and higher toxicity, except baseline hemoglobin and grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity. Female and elderly patients have a higher grade 3-4 toxicity rate when treated with combination CT with oxaliplatin or irinotecan. Prognostic classifications such as Köhne's can help differentiate subgroups of patients who benefit little with the use of combination CT.
    Medical Oncology 01/2006; 23(3):347-57. · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-dose epirubicin plus cisplatin was compared with the reference regimen of etoposide/cisplatin in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Four hundred two previously untreated patients with SCLC were randomized to receive etoposide 100 mg/m(2) on days 1-3 and cisplatin 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 or epirubicin 100 mg/m(2) and cisplatin 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 every 21 days for a total of 6 cycles. Patients were stratified according to treatment center and extent of disease (limited disease, n = 207; extensive disease, n = 195). Patients with limited disease were treated with thoracic radiation therapy after completion of chemotherapy, and those who exhibited a complete response were advised to receive prophylactic cranial irradiation. The primary endpoint was survival, and secondary endpoints were time to progression (TTP), response, toxicity, and costs. Patient characteristics were generally well balanced in the 2 arms, even though more patients in the epirubicin/cisplatin arm had > 5% weight loss and poor Karnofsky performance index compared with the etoposide/cisplatin arm. One hundred thirty-four patients (66.3%) in the etoposide/cisplatin arm and 126 (63.0%) in the epirubicin/cisplatin arm received all 6 planned cycles of chemotherapy. Response rate, TTP, and survival did not differ significantly between the 2 arms. Grade 3/4 neutropenia and toxic deaths occurred more frequently in the etoposide/cisplatin arm. Epirubicin/cisplatin showed a similar activity with a slightly lower toxicity profile than the reference regimen of etoposide/cisplatin. The epirubicin/cisplatin regimen may be recommended in the treatment of SCLC.
    Clinical Lung Cancer 11/2004; 6(3):175-83. · 2.04 Impact Factor
  • Leukemia and Lymphoma 05/2004; 45(4):853-5. · 2.61 Impact Factor
  • Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 12/2002; 50(11):1911-2. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A retrospective study analyzing non-Hodgkin's lym-phoma (NHL) diagnosed in patients in our center above 65 years of age between the years 1977–1991 is reported. Histological classification has been completed following the criteria of the Working Formulation. Of 521 patients, 427 were candidates for evaluation. Those above 65 years of age comprised the subject of our study, with a total of 95 cases. Population: 43/52 male/female, 47 intermediate-grade NHL, 38 low-grade NHL, Ann Arbor stages I–II/III–IV 36/59, performance status (PS) 0-1/2-3 39/56, B symptoms yes/no 47/48, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) normal/high 33/62, albumin normal/low 75/20, Cu normal/high 44/37 (the rest not available), B2 microglobuline normal/high 17/11 (the rest not available), tumor burden (MD Anderson) high/intermediate/low 41/28/26. The median range of cause specific survival was 30 months (50 for the low-grade NHL, 17 for the intermediate-grade). Significant prognostic factors: Histological grade (low versus high and intermediate), PS 0/1 versus 2/3, presence versus absence of B symptoms, normal versus high LDH, tumor burden (low versus high and intermediate). There is no significant statistical difference between elderly patients and young patients with a poor PS, phases I and IV, low albumin level and high and low tumor burden. Age as an adverse prognostic factor is evident in patients with a strong PS, phases II and III, normal albumin and intermediate tumor burden. The characteristics and prognostic factors of elderly patients with NHL are similar to those of the young. Age does not always function as an independent prognostic factor; age has no effect on groups with favorable or unfavorable prognostic factors and it is in the intermediate prognostic groups in which age plays a part in survival.
    Clinical & Translational Oncology - CLIN TRANSL ONCOL. 01/2002; 4(8):436-442.
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    ABSTRACT: Preoperative chemotherapy has become an accepted treatment for stage IIIA (N2) non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The majority of induction regimens employ cisplatin, although the importance of cis-platin dose in combination is unclear. A randomized trial was conducted to address whether higher pre-operative cisplatin doses result in improved survival and increased pathologic complete response in NSCLC. Patients with stage IIIA clinically enlarged and biopsy-proven N2 lesions were randomly assigned to receive either high-dose cisplatin (HDCP) (100 mg/m2) or moderate-dose cisplatin (MDCP) (50 mg/ m2) in combination with ifosfamide (3 g/m2) and mitomycin (6 mg/m2). Disease was restaged after 3 cycles, and those patients with response or stable disease underwent thoracotomy. From March 1993 to February 1997, 83 patients were randomized: 46 received HDCP, and 37 received MDCP. Clinical characteristics were well matched. Radiographic response rate was 59% for HDCP patients and 30% for MDCP patients (P = 0.01). Thoracotomy was performed in 71 patients (86%), 58 of whom had resectable disease. Complete resection rate was 61% in the HDCP group, and 51% in the MDCP group (P = 0.5). Postoperative mortality was 11%. Pathologic complete response was observed in one patient who received MDCP. Median survival in the HDCP and MDCP groups was 13 and 11 months, respectively (P = 0.3). In conclusion, higher radiographic response rate is observed in patients who receive HDCP, but this study fails to show any significant improvement in either overall survival or pathologic complete response in this group of patients.
    Clinical Lung Cancer 06/2000; 1(4):287-93. · 2.04 Impact Factor
  • Lung Cancer. 01/2000; 29(1):42-42.
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    ABSTRACT: The prognostic relevance of age is not well defined. The aim of the study was to review the characteristics of elderly patients (pts) with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) diagnosed and treated at a single institution over an 11-year period. Prognostic factors for survival were investigated. Between Nov/1981 and Jan/1993, out of 405 SCLC pts diagnosed, 152 were aged 65 years or older (median 70). One hundred and four pts aged 65–86 were treated with chemotherapy with or without surgery or radiotherapy. Distribution, univariate and multivariate analysis of prognostic factors were performed. Comorbidity, early death in treated pts, neutrophilia, hypoalbuminemia and poor performance status (ECOG, PS = 2-3) were more frequent in older pts (p < 0.05). Elderly pts underwent lesser extensive staging and received less than optimal treatment (p < 0.05). Factors that influenced the decision to treat with chemotherapy for elderly pts were: age, disease stage (VALG) and PS (0-1-3). Two-year survival of treated pts according to age was [8.2%/ 0.05)] and [6.2%/65-69 and 3.2%/≥70 (Wilcoxon, p < 0.05)]. Univariate analysis in older population showed a significative statistical prognostic importance (p < 0.05) for: disease extent, hyperglycemia, hyponatremia, hypoalbuminemia, bilirubin, AST, ALT, LDH and paraneoplastic syndrome. Multiple regression analysis showed independent prognostic value for LDH, hyponatremia, hyperglycemia, disease extent and number of cycles of chemotherapy. Age and PS influenced the decision to treat with chemotherapy. In the older population, early deaths were more frequent than in younger pts. However only pts aged 70 years or older showed a worse outcome. The last suggests that specific therapeutic regimens are needed for SCLC in this population of pts. Various prognostic parameters should be considered in the management of elderly pts: PS, hypoalbuminemia and neutrophilia.
    Clinical & Translational Oncology - CLIN TRANSL ONCOL. 01/2000; 2(6):294-300.
  • Lung Cancer. 01/2000; 29(1):9-9.
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    ABSTRACT: In 1989, we began a multicenter study to evaluate the potential benefit of preoperative chemotherapy with cisplatin, ifosfamide and mitomycin over surgery alone in CT-visible N2 non-small-cell lung cancer. We present here a 7-year assessment of this randomized trial. Sixty patients were randomized to receive either surgery alone or three cycles of mitomycin 6 mg/m2, ifosfamide 3 g/m2 and cisplatin 50 mg/m2, given intravenously on day 1 of each cycle at 3-week intervals and followed by surgery. All patients received thoracic irradiation after surgery. The resected tumors were evaluated for the presence of K-ras gene point mutations. Treatment arms were well-balanced in characteristics such as gender, age, histology, and tumor size. Mediastinoscopy and/or mediastinotomy (Chamberlain procedure) with a biopsy was performed in all patients with N2 stage detected by CT scan of the chest (83% of the patients in the preresectional chemotherapy arm and 63% of those in the surgery arm). In eight of the 25 patients (32%) who had mediastinoscopy in the preresectional chemotherapy arm, the initially positive mediastinal lymph nodes were downstaged. For the 30 patients who received preresectional chemotherapy, overall median survival was 22 months (95% CI, 13.4 30.6). Of the 30 patients who received surgery alone, overall median survival was 10 months (95% CI, 7.4-12.6; P = 0.005 by the log rank test). Updated survival data reveals a plateau in the preresectional chemotherapy group, and this still significant long-term survival benefit prompts us to hypothesize that even with short-term preresectional chemotherapy, the natural history of still resectable CT-visible N2 non-small cell lung cancer is favorably altered. The results of our study mirror the long-term survival recently reported in the MD Anderson randomized study.
    Lung Cancer 11/1999; 26(1):7-14. · 3.39 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

889 Citations
133.34 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2013
    • Hospital Universitari i Politècnic la Fe
      • • Department of Medical Oncology
      • • Medical Oncology Unit
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 2010–2012
    • Hospital la Magdalena
      Castellón, Valencia, Spain
  • 2004
    • Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet
      Caesaraugusta, Aragon, Spain