Jian Ping Liu

Shenzhen Second People's Hospital, Shen-ch’üan-shih, Zhejiang Sheng, China

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Publications (31)136.03 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background Acupuncture is often used for primary dysmenorrhea. But there is no convincing evidence due to low methodological quality. We aim to assess immediate effect of acupuncture at specific acupoint compared with unrelated acupoint and nonacupoint on primary dysmenorrhea.Methods The Acupuncture Analgesia Effect in Primary Dysmenorrhoea-II is a multicenter controlled trial conducted in six large hospitals of China. Patients who met inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to classic acupoint (N = 167), unrelated acupoint (N = 167), or non-acupoint (N = 167) group on a 1:1:1 basis. They received three sessions with electro-acupuncture at a classic acupoint (Sanyinjiao, SP6), or an unrelated acupoint (Xuanzhong, GB39), or nonacupoint location, respectively. The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Measurements were obtained at 0, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes following the first intervention. In addition, patients scored changes of general complaints using Cox retrospective symptom scales (RSS-Cox) and 7-point verbal rating scale (VRS) during three menstrual cycles. Secondary outcomes included VAS score for average pain, pain total time, additional in-bed time, and proportion of participants using analgesics during three menstrual cycles.FindingsFive hundred and one people underwent random assignment. The primary comparison of VAS scores following the first intervention demonstrated that classic acupoint group was more effective both than unrelated acupoint (−4.0 mm, 95% CI −7.1 to −0.9, P = 0.010) and nonacupoint (−4.0 mm, 95% CI −7.0 to −0.9, P = 0.012) groups. However, no significant differences were detected among the three acupuncture groups for RSS-Cox or VRS outcomes. The per-protocol analysis showed similar pattern. No serious adverse events were noted.Conclusion Specific acupoint acupuncture produced a statistically, but not clinically, significant effect compared with unrelated acupoint and nonacupoint acupuncture in primary dysmenorrhea patients. Future studies should focus on effects of multiple points acupuncture on primary dysmenorrhea.
    Pain Medicine 04/2014; · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • Yunxia Liu, Jian Ping Liu, Yun Xia
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    ABSTRACT: Chinese herbal medicines have been used for a long time to treat osteoporosis. The evidence of their benefits and harms needs to be systematically reviewed. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of Chinese herbal medicines as a general experimental intervention for treating primary osteoporosis by comparing herbal treatments with placebo, no intervention and conventional medicine. We searched the following electronic databases to January 2013: the Specialised Register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, JICST-E, AMED, Chinese Biomedical Database and CINAHL. Randomised controlled trials of Chinese herbal medicines compared with placebo, no intervention or conventional medicine were included. Two authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias independently. Disagreement was resolved by discussion. One hundred and eight randomised trials involving 10,655 participants were included. Ninety-nine different Chinese herbal medicines were tested and compared with placebo (three trials), no intervention (five trials) or conventional medicine (61 trials), or Chinese herbal medicines plus western medicine were compared with western medicine (47 trials). The risk of bias across all studies was unclear for most domains primarily due to inadequate reporting of study design. Although we rated the risk of selective reporting for all studies as unclear, only a few studies contributed numerical data to the key outcomes.Seven trials reported fracture incidence, but they were small in sample size, suffered from various biases and tested different Chinese herbal medicines. These trials compared Kanggusong capsules versus placebo, Kanggusong granule versus Caltrate or ipriflavone plus Caltrate, Yigu capsule plus calcium versus placebo plus calcium, Xianlinggubao capsule plus Caltrate versus placebo plus Caltrate, Bushen Zhuanggu granules plus Caltrate versus placebo granules plus Caltrate, Kanggusong soup plus Caltrate versus Caltrate, Zhuangguqiangjin tablets and Shujinbogu tablets plus calcitonin ampoule versus calcitonin ampoule. The results were inconsistent.One trial showed that Bushenhuoxue therapy plus calcium carbonate tablets and alfacalcidol had a better effect on quality of life score (scale 0 to 100, higher is better) than calcium carbonate tablets and alfacalcidol (mean difference (MD) 5.30; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.67 to 6.93).Compared with placebo in three separate trials, Chinese herbal medicines (Migu decoction, Bushen Yigu soft extract, Kanggusong capsules) showed a statistically significant increase in bone mineral density (BMD) (e.g. Kanggusong capsules, MD 0.06 g/cm(3); 95% CI 0.02 to 0.10). Compared with no intervention in five trials, only two showed that Chinese herbal medicines had a statistically significant effect on increase in BMD (e.g. Shigu yin, MD 0.08 g/cm(3); 95% CI 0.03 to 0.13). Compared with conventional medicine in 61 trials, 23 showed that Chinese herbal medicines had a statistically significant effect on increase in BMD. In 48 trials evaluating Chinese herbal medicines plus western medication against western medication, 26 showed better effects of the combination therapy on increase in BMD.No trial reported death or serious adverse events of Chinese herbal medicines, while some trials reported minor adverse effects such as nausea, diarrhoea, etc. Current findings suggest that the beneficial effect of Chinese herbal medicines in improving BMD is still uncertain and more rigorous studies are warranted.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 03/2014; 3:CD005467. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Myocarditis is defined as inflammation of the myocardium accompanied by myocellular necrosis. Experimental evidence suggests that autoimmune mechanisms follow viral infection, resulting in inflammation and necrosis in the myocardium. However, the use of corticosteroids as immunosuppressives for this condition remains controversial. The existing review was updated. The primary objective of this review is to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of treating acute or chronic viral myocarditis with corticosteroids. The secondary objective is to determine the best dose regimen. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 7 of 12, 2012) on The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE OVID (1946 to July Week 2, 2012), EMBASE OVID (1980 to Week 29, 2012), BIOSIS Previews (1969 to 20 July 2012), ISI Web of Science (1970 to 20th July, 2012), and LILACS (from its inception to 25 July, 2012) , Chinese Biomed Database, CNKI and WANFANG Databases (from their inception to 31 December 2012). We applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of corticosteroids for viral myocarditis compared with no intervention, placebo, supportive therapy, antiviral agents therapy or conventional therapy, including trials of corticosteroids plus other treatment versus other treatment alone, irrespective of blinding, publication status, or language. Two review authors extracted data independently. Results were presented as risk ratios (RRs) and mean differences (MDs), both with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eight RCTs (with 719 participants) were included in this update. The trials were small in size and methodological quality was poor. Viral detection was performed in 38% of participants, among whom 56% had positive results. Mortality between corticosteroids and control groups was non-significant (RR, 0.93, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.24). At 1 to 3 months follow-up, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was higher in the corticosteroids group compared to the control group (MD 7.36%, 95% CI 4.94 to 9.79), but there was substantial heterogeneity. Benefits were observed in LVEF in two trials with 200 children given corticosteroids (MD 9.00%, 95% CI 7.48 to 10.52). New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and left ventricular end-stage systole diameter (LVESD) were not affected. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) (MD -104.00 U/L, 95% CI -115.18 to -92.82), Isoenzyme of creatine phosphate MB (CKMB) (MD 10.35 U/L, 95% CI 8.92 to 11.78), were reduced in the corticosteroids group compared to the control group, although the evidence is limited to small participant numbers. There were insufficient data on adverse events. For people diagnosed with viral myocarditis and low LVEF, corticosteroids do not reduce mortality. They may improve cardiac function but the trials were of low quality and small size so this finding must be regarded as uncertain. High-quality, large-scale RCTs should be careful designed to determine the role of corticosteroid treatment for viral myocarditis. Adverse events should also be carefully evaluated.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 10/2013; 10:CD004471. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fatty liver disease is potentially a reversible condition that may lead to end-stage liver disease. Since herbal medicines such as Crataegus pinnatifida and Salvia miltiorrhiza have increasingly been used in the management of fatty liver disease, a systematic review on herbal medicine for fatty liver disease is needed. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of herbal medicines for people with alcoholic or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 3, 2012), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded to 1 March 2012. We also searched the Chinese BioMedical Database, Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese VIP Information, Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database, and the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database to 2 March 2012. We included randomised clinical trials comparing herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, a pharmacological intervention, or a non-pharmacological intervention such as diet or lifestyle, or Western interventions in participants with fatty liver disease. Two review authors extracted data independently. We used the 'risk of bias' tool to assess the risk of bias of the included trials. We assessed the following domains: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting, and other sources of bias. We presented the effects estimates as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) or as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI, depending on the variables of the outcome measures. We included 77 randomised clinical trials, which included 6753 participants with fatty liver disease. The risks of bias (overestimation of benefits and underestimation of harms) was high in all trials. The mean sample size was 88 participants (ranging from 40 to 200 participants) per trial. Seventy-five different herbal medicine products were tested. Herbal medicines tested in the randomised trials included single-herb products (Gynostemma pentaphyllum, Panax notoginseng, andPrunus armeniaca), proprietary herbal medicines commercially available, and combination formulas prescribed by practitioners. The most commonly used herbs wereCrataegus pinnatifida,Salvia miltiorrhiza,Alisma orientalis,Bupleurum chinense,Cassia obtusifolia, Astragalus membranaceous, and Rheum palmatum. None of the trials reported death, hepatic-related morbidity, quality of life, or costs. A large number of trials reported positive effects on putative surrogate outcomes such as serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatases, ultrasound, and computed tomography scan. Twenty-seven trials reported adverse effects and found no significant difference between herbal medicines versus control. However, the risk of bias of the included trials was high.The outcomes were ultrasound findings in 22 trials, liver computed tomography findings in eight trials, aspartate aminotransferase levels in 64 trials, alanine aminotransferase activity in 77 trials, and glutamyltransferase activities in 44 trials. Six herbal medicines showed statistically significant beneficial effects on ultrasound, four on liver computed tomography, 42 on aspartate aminotransferase activity, 49 on alanine aminotransferase activity, three on alkaline phosphatases activity, and 32 on glutamyltransferase activity compared with control interventions. Some herbal medicines seemed to have positive effects on aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, ultrasound, and computed tomography. We found no significant difference on adverse effects between herbal medicine and control groups. The findings are not conclusive due to the high risk of bias of the included trials and the limited number of trials testing individual herbal medicines. Accordingly, there is also high risk of random errors.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 08/2013; 8:CD009059. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypertriglyceridaemia is associated with many diseases including atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension and chylomicronaemia. Chinese herbal medicines have been used for a long time as lipid-lowering agents. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for hypertriglyceridaemia. SEARCH METHODS: We searched a number of databases including The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and several Chinese databases (all until May 2012). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials in participants with hypertriglyceridaemia comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, and pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. Any disagreement was resolved by discussion and a decision was achieved based on consensus. We assessed trials for risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. MAIN RESULTS: We included three randomised trials with 170 participants. Ninety participants were randomised to the Chinese herbal medicines groups and 80 to the comparator groups with numbers ranging from 50 to 60 participants per trial. The duration of treatment varied from four to six weeks. All the included trials were conducted in China and published in Chinese. Overall, the risk of bias of included trials was unclear. There were no outcome data in any of the trials on death from any cause, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, health-related quality of life, or costs.Three different herbal medicines, including Zhusuan Huoxue decoction, Huoxue Huayu Tongluo decoction, and Chushi Huayu decoction were evaluated. All three trials investigating Chinese herbal medicines treatment alone (two studies) or in combination with gemfibrozil (one study) reported results on serum triglyceride (TG) in favour of the herbal treatment. We did not perform a meta-analysis due to significant clinical heterogeneity between the studies.No relevant differences in adverse effects occurred and no serious adverse events were noted. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The present systematic review suggests that Chinese herbal medicines may have positive effects on hypertriglyceridaemia. The trials did not report serious adverse effects following Chinese herbal medicines treatment. However, based on an unclear risk of bias in included studies and lack of patient-important long-term outcomes, no definite conclusion could be reached.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 06/2013; 6:CD009560. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent placement is a standard treatment for coronary heart disease (CHD). In-stent restenosis after PCI remains an important clinical problem. Xiongshao capsule has been reported to be beneficial in preventing restenosis after PCI in CHD patients. However, the strength of evidence to support its use is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To systematically assess the efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine Xiongshao capsule in preventing restenosis after PCI in patients with CHD. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (Issue 3 of 2012), MEDLINE (OVID) (1948 to week 1 March 2012), EMBASE (OVID) (1980 to week 10 2012), ISI Web of Science with Conference Proceedings (1970 to 14 March 2012), LILACS (1982 to 15 March 2012), Chinese biomedical literature database (1980 to May 2012), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (1994 to May 2012), Chinese Medical Current Contents (1994 to May 2012), VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals (1989 to May 2012), Chinese Master's Theses Full-Text Database (1994 to May 2012), China Doctor Dissertation Full-Text Database (1994 to May 2012), and China Proceedings of Conference Full-Text Database (1994 to May 2012). We also searched ongoing trials and research registries. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials comparing Xiongshao capsule alone/plus conventional western medicine with the same conventional western medicine alone/plus placebo in participants with CHD who met the recognised diagnostic criteria and had successfully undergone a PCI procedure were included. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently selected trials and extracted data. Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included trials using The Cochrane Collaboration tool, and any disagreements were resolved by discussion with a third review author. Data were pooled for meta-analysis using the fixed-effect model, and the results were expressed as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). MAIN RESULTS: Four trials involving 649 participants were included in this review. Two of these trials (459 participants) were designed as randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with an adequate methodological description; the other two trials (190 participants) described an inadequate methodological design. All four trials with 649 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Significant differences were noted in rates of restenosis, recurrence angina pectoris, and serious cardiovascular adverse events between Xiongshao capsule plus conventional western medicine and the same conventional western medicine alone; RR values (95% CIs) were 0.41 (0.22 to 0.75), 0.47 (0.31 to 0.72), and 0.47 (0.25 to 0.90), respectively. Xiongshao capsule plus conventional western medicine showed more significant reductions in restenosis (RR 0.52, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.80), recurrence angina pectoris (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.38), and serious cardiovascular adverse events (RR 0.45, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.70) than the same conventional western medicine plus placebo. Safety outcomes and adverse events of the Xiongshao capsule were reported in two trials, which reported no adverse events. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The summary estimates indicate a protective effect of Xiongshao on restenosis and suggest that Xiongshao capsule may be used to prevent restenosis after a PCI procedure in CHD patients. However, this evidence is derived from small randomised trials, all conducted in China, and two of the included trials showed important methodological limitations that undermine the validity of the findings. Additional high-quality research trials with sufficient sample size are required.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2013; 5:CD009581. · 5.70 Impact Factor
  • Yun Xia, Hui Luo, Jian Ping Liu, Christian Gluud
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    ABSTRACT: Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists. When compared with placebo or no intervention, we were unable to identify convincing evidence that phyllanthus species are beneficial in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Some randomised clinical trials have compared phyllanthus species versus antiviral drugs. To evaluate the benefits and harms of phyllanthus species compared with antiviral drugs for patients with chronic HBV infection. Searches were performed in The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Gorup Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expended, and the Chinese Biomedical CD Database, China Network Knowledge Information, Chinese Science Journal Database, TCM Online, and Wanfang Database. Conference proceedings in Chinese were handsearched. All searches were conducted until 31st October 2012. Randomised clinical trials comparing phyllanthus species with antiviral drugs for patients with chronic HBV infection. We included trials irrespective of blinding, publication status, or language. Two authors selected the trials and extracted the data independently. The RevMan software was used for statistical analysis of dichotomous data with risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assessed the risk of bias to control for systematic errors. We calculated the number of patients needed (required information size) to be randomised in order to make reliable conclusions. We assessed the cumulative findings with trial sequential analysis to control for random errors. We identified five randomised clinical trials with 290 patients. All trials were considered to have high risk of bias. Patients in the experimental group received compound phyllanthus for three months to 12 months. Patients in the antiviral drug group received lamivudine, interferon alpha, thymosin, or thymosin alpha 1. None of the trials reported mortality, hepatitis B-related morbidity, quality of life, or liver histology. Phyllanthus seemed to have a superior effect on clearance of serum HBeAg at the end of treatment in conventional meta-analysis (RR 0.76; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.91, P = 0.002; I(2) = 0%), but not when trial sequential analysis was applied. Phyllanthus had no significant effect on clearance of serum HBsAg (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.08, P = 0.92; I(2) = 0%) or HBV DNA (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.53 to 1.31, P = 0.43; I(2) = 70%) when compared with antiviral drugs. Data on HBeAg seroconversion was reported in one trial and no significant difference was found comparing phyllanthus versus lamivudine (RR 0.89; 95% CI 0.71 to 1.11). No data were reported on adverse events in the five trials. There is currently insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of phyllanthus for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection. Researchers who are interested in conducting further randomised clinical trials on phyllanthus ought to monitor both beneficial and harmful effects and should primarily test the herb against placebo in addition to antiviral drugs that are known to offer more benefit than harm. Only in this way new interventions can be assessed without compromising personal ethical considerations.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2013; 4:CD009004. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: One in five fibromyalgia sufferers use acupuncture treatment within two years of diagnosis. OBJECTIVES: To examine the benefits and safety of acupuncture treatment for fibromyalgia. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, National Research Register, HSR Project and Current Contents, as well as the Chinese databases VIP and Wangfang to January 2012 with no language restrictions. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised and quasi-randomised studies evaluating any type of invasive acupuncture for fibromyalgia diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, and reporting any main outcome: pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being, stiffness and adverse events. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two author pairs selected trials, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Treatment effects were reported as standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for continuous outcomes using different measurement tools (pain, physical function, fatigue, sleep, total well-being and stiffness) and risk ratio (RR) and 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes (adverse events). We pooled data using the random-effects model. MAIN RESULTS: Nine trials (395 participants) were included. All studies except one were at low risk of selection bias; five were at risk of selective reporting bias (favouring either treatment group); two were subject to attrition bias (favouring acupuncture); three were subject to performance bias (favouring acupuncture) and one to detection bias (favouring acupuncture). Three studies utilised electro-acupuncture (EA) with the remainder using manual acupuncture (MA) without electrical stimulation. All studies used 'formula acupuncture' except for one, which used trigger points.Low quality evidence from one study (13 participants) showed EA improved symptoms with no adverse events at one month following treatment. Mean pain in the non-treatment control group was 70 points on a 100 point scale; EA reduced pain by a mean of 22 points (95% confidence interval (CI) 4 to 41), or 22% absolute improvement. Control group global well-being was 66.5 points on a 100 point scale; EA improved well-being by a mean of 15 points (95% CI 5 to 26 points). Control group stiffness was 4.8 points on a 0 to 10 point; EA reduced stiffness by a mean of 0.9 points (95% CI 0.1 to 2 points; absolute reduction 9%, 95% CI 4% to 16%). Fatigue was 4.5 points (10 point scale) without treatment; EA reduced fatigue by a mean of 1 point (95% CI 0.22 to 2 points), absolute reduction 11% (2% to 20%). There was no difference in sleep quality (MD 0.4 points, 95% CI -1 to 0.21 points, 10 point scale), and physical function was not reported.Moderate quality evidence from six studies (286 participants) indicated that acupuncture (EA or MA) was no better than sham acupuncture, except for less stiffness at one month. Subgroup analysis of two studies (104 participants) indicated benefits of EA. Mean pain was 70 points on 0 to 100 point scale with sham treatment; EA reduced pain by 13% (5% to 22%); (SMD -0.63, 95% CI -1.02 to -0.23). Global well-being was 5.2 points on a 10 point scale with sham treatment; EA improved well-being: SMD 0.65, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.05; absolute improvement 11% (4% to 17%). EA improved sleep, from 3 points on a 0 to 10 point scale in the sham group: SMD 0.40 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.79); absolute improvement 8% (0.2% to 16%). Low-quality evidence from one study suggested that MA group resulted in poorer physical function: mean function in the sham group was 28 points (100 point scale); treatment worsened function by a mean of 6 points (95% CI -10.9 to -0.7). Low-quality evidence from three trials (289 participants) suggested no difference in adverse events between real (9%) and sham acupuncture (35%); RR 0.44 (95% CI 0.12 to 1.63).Moderate quality evidence from one study (58 participants) found that compared with standard therapy alone (antidepressants and exercise), adjunct acupuncture therapy reduced pain at one month after treatment: mean pain was 8 points on a 0 to 10 point scale in the standard therapy group; treatment reduced pain by 3 points (95% CI -3.9 to -2.1), an absolute reduction of 30% (21% to 39%). Two people treated with acupuncture reported adverse events; there were none in the control group (RR 3.57; 95% CI 0.18 to 71.21). Global well-being, sleep, fatigue and stiffness were not reported. Physical function data were not usable.Low quality evidence from one study (38 participants) showed a short-term benefit of acupuncture over antidepressants in pain relief: mean pain was 29 points (0 to 100 point scale) in the antidepressant group; acupuncture reduced pain by 17 points (95% CI -24.1 to -10.5). Other outcomes or adverse events were not reported.Moderate-quality evidence from one study (41 participants) indicated that deep needling with or without deqi did not differ in pain, fatigue, function or adverse events. Other outcomes were not reported.Four studies reported no differences between acupuncture and control or other treatments described at six to seven months follow-up.No serious adverse events were reported, but there were insufficient adverse events to be certain of the risks. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is low to moderate-level evidence that compared with no treatment and standard therapy, acupuncture improves pain and stiffness in people with fibromyalgia. There is moderate-level evidence that the effect of acupuncture does not differ from sham acupuncture in reducing pain or fatigue, or improving sleep or global well-being. EA is probably better than MA for pain and stiffness reduction and improvement of global well-being, sleep and fatigue. The effect lasts up to one month, but is not maintained at six months follow-up. MA probably does not improve pain or physical functioning. Acupuncture appears safe. People with fibromyalgia may consider using EA alone or with exercise and medication. The small sample size, scarcity of studies for each comparison, lack of an ideal sham acupuncture weaken the level of evidence and its clinical implications. Larger studies are warranted.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2013; 5:CD007070. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Herbal medicine has been widely used in patients with advanced colorectal cancer in China, but its efficacy has not been confirmed. To evaluate the beneficial effect and safety on Chinese herbal medicine therapy for advanced stage colorectal cancer, and it's influence on the patients' quality of life. The following electronic databases were searched: BIOSIS Previews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline EMBASE, Biological Abstracts, until Aug. 2011. Manual searching was performed on 16 types of Chinese journals which started from their respective first publication dates, as well as unpublished conference proceedings. No language restriction was applied. Randomized or quasi-randomised controlled trials on the treatment of advanced stage colorectal cancer by herbal medicines or herbal medicines combined with chemotherapy, regardless of blinding. The data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Methodological quality of the included in trials was assessed according to the following parameters: randomisation, allocation concealment, double blinding, and drop-out rates. A total of 20 randomised controlled trials with 1304 participants were identified. All the 20 trials compared the use of herbal medicines with chemotherapy and chemotherapy alone in the treatment of advanced stage colorectal cancers.Compared with chemotherapy alone, the use of Quxie capsule combined with chemotherapy could decrease mortality rate (RR 0.17, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.97); the use of Jianpi Jiedu formula, Xiaozheng formula and Yiqi Huoxue herbal medicine combined with chemotherapy respectively could improve 1-year survival rate significantly; the use of Xiaozheng Formula in conjunction with chemotherapy could improve 3-year survival rate. There were 10 herbal medicines showing benefit in improving quality of life. Herbal medicines did not show additional benefit in response rate or stability rate. No trials reported serious adverse effect from herbal medicine. Some herbal medicines combined chemotherapy compared with chemotherapy alone showed more beneficial effects in improving 1-year, 3-year survival and quality of life.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2012; 5:CD004653. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of tissue that is morphologically and biologically similar to normal endometrium in locations outside the uterus. Surgical and hormonal treatment of endometriosis have unpleasant side effects and high rates of relapse. In China, treatment of endometriosis using Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is routine and considerable research into the role of CHM in alleviating pain, promoting fertility, and preventing relapse has taken place.This review is an update of a previous review published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, issue No 3. To review the effectiveness and safety of CHM in alleviating endometriosis-related pain and infertility. We searched the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library) and the following English language electronic databases (from their inception to 31/10/2011): MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, and NLH.We also searched Chinese language electronic databases: Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Sci & Tech Journals (VIP), Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS), and Chinese Medical Current Contents (CMCC). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving CHM versus placebo, biomedical treatment, another CHM intervention; or CHM plus biomedical treatment versus biomedical treatment were selected. Only trials with confirmed randomisation procedures and laparoscopic diagnosis of endometriosis were included. Risk of bias assessment, and data extraction and analysis were performed independently by three review authors. Data were combined for meta-analysis using relative risk (RR) for dichotomous data. A fixed-effect statistical model was used, where appropriate. Data not suitable for meta-analysis were presented as descriptive data. Two Chinese RCTs involving 158 women were included in this review. Both these trials described adequate methodology. Neither trial compared CHM with placebo treatment.There was no evidence of a significant difference in rates of symptomatic relief between CHM and gestrinone administered subsequent to laparoscopic surgery (95.65% versus 93.87%; risk ratio (RR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.12, one RCT). The intention-to-treat analysis also showed no significant difference between the groups (RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.18). There was no significant difference between the CHM and gestrinone groups with regard to the total pregnancy rate (69.6% versus 59.1%; RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.59, one RCT).CHM administered orally and then in conjunction with a herbal enema resulted in a greater proportion of women obtaining symptomatic relief than with danazol (RR 5.06, 95% CI 1.28 to 20.05; RR 5.63, 95% CI 1.47 to 21.54, respectively). Overall, 100% of women in all the groups showed some improvement in their symptoms.Oral plus enema administration of CHM showed a greater reduction in average dysmenorrhoea pain scores than did danazol (mean difference (MD) -2.90, 95% CI -4.55 to -1.25; P < 0.01). Combined oral and enema administration of CHM also showed a greater improvement measured as the disappearance or shrinkage of adnexal masses than with danazol (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.78). For lumbosacral pain, rectal discomfort, or vaginal nodules tenderness, there was no significant difference between CHM and danazol. Post-surgical administration of CHM may have comparable benefits to gestrinone but with fewer side effects. Oral CHM may have a better overall treatment effect than danazol; it may be more effective in relieving dysmenorrhoea and shrinking adnexal masses when used in conjunction with a CHM enema. However, more rigorous research is required to accurately assess the potential role of CHM in treating endometriosis.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2012; 5:CD006568. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-dose or dose-intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy often causes myelosuppression and severe neutropenia among cancer patients. Severe neutropenia accompanied by fever, named febrile neutropenia (FN), is the most serious manifestation of neutropenia usually requiring hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics. FN and neutropenia can lead to chemotherapy treatment delays or dose reductions, which potentially compromises the effectiveness of cancer treatment and prospects for a cure. Granulocyte-macrophage (GM) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSFs) are administered during chemotherapy in order to prevent or reduce the incidence or the duration of FN and neutropenia. To assess the effect of prophylactic colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) in reducing the incidence and duration of FN, and all-cause and infection-related mortality during chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, HEALTHSTAR, International Health Technology Assessment, SOMED, AMED and BIOSIS up to 8 August 2011. We also searched three Chinese databases (VIP, CNKI, CBM), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and OpenGrey.eu up to August 2011. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CSFs (any dose) with placebo or no treatment in patients with breast cancer at any stage, at risk of developing FN while undergoing any type of chemotherapy. We used pooled risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for binary outcomes. At least two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Trial authors were contacted for further details when information was unclear. We included eight RCTs involving 2156 participants with different stages of breast cancer and chemotherapy regimens. The trials were carried out between 1995 and 2008 and judged as being at least at moderate risk of bias. The strength of the evidence was weak for the majority of outcomes, which was mostly because of the small numbers of evaluable patients, varying definitions, as well as unclear measurements of the trials' outcomes and uncertain influences of supportive treatments on them. In most trials, the chemotherapy regimens had a risk of FN that was below the threshold at which current guidelines recommend routine primary prophylaxis with CSFs. Using CSFs significantly reduced the proportion of patients with FN (RR 0.27; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.70; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 12) but there was substantial heterogeneity which can be explained by possible differential effects of G-CSFs and GM-CSFs and different definitions of FN. A significant reduction in early mortality was observed in CSF-treated patients compared to placebo or no treatment (RR 0.32; 95% CI 0.13 to 0.77; NNTB 79). This finding was based on 23 fatal events in 2143 patients; wherein 19 of these 23 events occurred in one study and 17 events were attributed to progression of the disease by the study authors. For infection-related mortality, there were no significant differences between CSF and control groups (RR 0.14; 95% CI 0.02 to 1.29). In CSF-treated patients, the risk for hospitalization was significantly reduced (RR 0.14; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.30; NNTB 13), as well as the use of intravenous antibiotics (RR 0.35; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.55; NNTB 18). The risks of severe neutropenia, infection or not maintaining the scheduled dose of chemotherapy did not differ between CSF-treated and control groups. CSFs frequently led to bone pain (RR 5.88; 95% CI 2.54 to 13.60; number needed to treat for an additional harmful outcome (NNTH) 3) and injection-site reactions (RR 3.59; 95% CI 2.33 to 5.53; NNTH 3). In patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy, CSFs have shown evidence of benefit in the prevention of FN. There is evidence, though less reliable, of a decrease of all-cause mortality during chemotherapy and a reduced need for hospital care. No reliable evidence was found for a reduction of infection-related mortality, a higher dose intensity of chemotherapy with CSFs or diminished rates of severe neutropenia and infections. The majority of adverse events reported from CSF use were bone pain and injection-site reactions but no conclusions could be drawn regarding late-term side effects.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2012; 10:CD007913. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia seen in cardiovascular departments. Treatments include medical interventions and catheter ablation. Due to uncertainties in medical therapies for AF, and the need to continue sinus rhythm, ablation has been recently considered as a viable alternative. Many new ablation methods based on pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) have been developed. The primary objective of this review was to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of catheter ablation (CA) in comparison with medical treatment in patients with paroxysmal and persistent AF. The secondary objective was to determine the best regimen of CA. Searches were run on The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library Issue 3 2009, MEDLINE (1950 to August 2009), EMBASE (1980 to August 2009), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (1978 to August 2009) and the CKNI Chinese Paper Database (1994 to 2009) . Several journals published in Chinese were also handsearched. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in people with paroxysmal and persistent AF treated by any type of CA method. Two reviewers independently selected the trials for inclusion. Assessments of risk of bias were performed by two reviewers, and relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used for dichotomous variables. Meta-analysis were performed where appropriate. A total of 32 RCTs (3,560 patients) were included. RCTs were small in size and of poor quality.CA compared with medical therapies: seven RCTs indicated that CA had a better effect in inhibiting recurrence of AF [RR 0.27; 95% CI 0.18, 0.41)] but there was significant heterogeneity. There was limited evidence to suggest that sinus rhythm was restored during CA (one small trial: RR 0.28, 95% CI 0.20-0.40), and at the end of follow-up (RR 1.87, 95% CI 1.31-2.67; I(2)=83%). There were no differences in mortality (RR, 0.50, 95% CI 0.04 to 5.65), fatal and non-fatal embolic complication (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.18 to 5.68) or death from thrombo-embolic events (RR 3.04, 95% CI 0.13 to 73.43).Comparisons of different CAs; 25 RCTs compared CA of various kinds. Circumferential pulmonary vein ablation was better than segmental pulmonary vein ablation in improving symptoms of AF (p<=0.01) and in reducing the recurrence of AF (p<0.01). There is limited evidence to suggest which ablation method was the best. There is limited evidence to suggest that CA may be a better treatment option compared to medical therapies in the management of persistent AF. This review was also unable to recommend the best CA method.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2012; 4:CD007101. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ETHNOGRAPHIC RELEVANCE: Clinical trials investigating Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) have been frequently criticised for their lack of scientific rigour. As part of the GP-TCM project a team of experienced clinical researchers and CHM practitioners have developed clinical trial guidelines for CHM that combine an appreciation for traditional methods of practice with detailed and practical advice on research methodology. This paper presents an executive summary of this work. It introduces the practice of CHM and the key considerations that need to be addressed whilst researching this traditional medical system. These guidelines emphasise the importance of identifying best practice, and then developing and applying appropriate and rigorous research methodologies to investigate CHM as a whole system. It is hoped that this will encourage a thoughtful and meticulous process of investigation that will clarify the contribution that CHM can make to our future healthcare. Innovative new approaches are considered including the application of the new "omic" technologies and systems biology as a way of enhancing our understanding of traditional practice.
    Journal of ethnopharmacology 12/2011; 140(3):550-4. · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acupuncture and related techniques are promoted as a treatment for smoking cessation in the belief that they may reduce nicotine withdrawal symptoms. The objectives of this review are to determine the effectiveness of acupuncture and the related interventions of acupressure, laser therapy and electrostimulation in smoking cessation, in comparison with no intervention, sham treatment, or other interventions. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group specialized register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews, PsycINFO, Science Citation Index, AMED, Acubriefs in November 2010; and four Chinese databases: Chinese Biomedical Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Data and VIP in November 2010. Randomized trials comparing a form of acupuncture, acupressure, laser therapy or electrostimulation with either no intervention, sham treatment or another intervention for smoking cessation. We extracted data in duplicate on the type of smokers recruited, the nature of the intervention and control procedures, the outcome measures, method of randomization, and completeness of follow up.We assessed abstinence from smoking at the earliest time-point (before six weeks), and at the last measurement point between six months and one year. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence for each trial, and biochemically validated rates if available. Those lost to follow up were counted as continuing smokers. Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect model. We included 33 reports of studies. Compared with sham acupuncture, the fixed-effect risk ratio (RR) for the short-term effect of acupuncture was 1.18 (95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.34), and for the long-term effect was 1.05 (CI 0.82 to 1.35). The studies were not judged to be free from bias. Acupuncture was less effective than nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). There was no evidence that acupuncture is superior to waiting list, nor to psychological interventions in short- or long-term. The evidence on acupressure and laser stimulation was insufficient and could not be combined. The evidence suggested that electrostimulation is not superior to sham electrostimulation. There is no consistent, bias-free evidence that acupuncture, acupressure, laser therapy or electrostimulation are effective for smoking cessation, but lack of evidence and methodological problems mean that no firm conclusions can be drawn. Further, well designed research into acupuncture, acupressure and laser stimulation is justified since these are popular interventions and safe when correctly applied, though these interventions alone are likely to be less effective than evidence-based interventions.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2011; · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    Wei Chen, Yin Zhang, Jian Ping Liu
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    ABSTRACT: Chinese herbal medicine is frequently used for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy in China. Many controlled trials have been undertaken to investigate its efficacy. To assess the beneficial effects and harms of Chinese herbal medicine for people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (15 June 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2010 in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (January 1966 to June 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2010), AMED (January 1985 to June 2010), Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1979 to June 2010), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI) (1979 to June 2010), and VIP Chinese Science and Technique Journals Database (1989 to June 2010). We searched for unpublished literature in the Chinese Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database (from inception to March 2010). No language or publication restrictions were used. We included randomized controlled trials of Chinese herbal medicine (with a minimum of four weeks treatment duration) for people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with placebo, no intervention, or conventional interventions. Trials of herbal medicine plus a conventional drug versus the drug alone were also included. Two authors independently extracted data and evaluated trial quality. We contacted study authors for additional information. The data analyses were carried out using Review Manager 5.1 (Cochrane software). Thirty-nine randomized trials involving 2890 participants were included. All trials were conducted and published in China. Thirty different herbal medicines were tested in these trials, including four single herbs (extracts from a single herb), eight traditional Chinese patent medicines, and 18 self-concocted Chinese herbal compound prescriptions. The trials reported on global symptom improvement (including improvement in numbness or pain) and changes in nerve conduction velocity. There was inadequate reporting on adverse events in the included trials. Most of the trials did not mention whether they monitored adverse effects at all. Only two trials reported adverse events: one occurred in the control group in one trial and in which group was unclear in the other trial . Conclusions cannot be drawn from this review about the safety of herbal medicines due to inadequate reporting. Most of the trials were of low methodological quality and therefore the interpretation of any positive findings for the efficacy of the included Chinese herbal medicines for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy should be made with caution. Based on this systematic review, there is no evidence to support the objective effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicines for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. No well designed, randomized placebo controlled trial with objective outcome measures has been conducted.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2011; · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hypercholesterolemia is an important key contributory factor for ischemic heart disease and is associated with age, high blood pressure, a family history of hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes. Chinese herbal medicines have been used for a long time as lipid-lowering agents. To assess the effects of Chinese herbal medicines on hypercholesterolemia. We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library (issue 8, 2010), MEDLINE (until July 2010), EMBASE (until July 2010 ), Chinese BioMedical Database (until July 2010), Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (until July 2010), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (until July 2010), Chinese VIP Information (until July 2010), Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database (until July 2010), and Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (until July 2010). We considered randomized controlled clinical trials in hypercholesterolemic participants comparing Chinese herbal medicines with placebo, no treatment, and pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. We resolved any disagreements with this assessment through discussion and a decision was achieved based by consensus. We assessed trials for the risk of bias against key criteria: random sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of participants, incomplete outcome data, selective outcome reporting and other sources of bias. We included 22 randomized trials (2130 participants). The mean treatment duration was 2.3 ± 1.3 months (ranging from one to six months). Twenty trials were conducted in China and 18 trials were published in Chinese. Overall, the risk of bias of included trials was high or unclear. Five different herbal medicines were evaluated in the included trials, which compared herbs with conventional medicine in six comparisons (20 trials), or placebo (two trials). There were no outcome data in any of the trials on cardiovascular events and death from any cause. One trial each reported well-being (no significant differences) and economic costs. No serious adverse events were observed. Xuezhikang was the most commonly used herbal formula investigated. A significant effect on total cholesterol (two trial, 254 participants) was shown in favor of Xuezhikang when compared with inositol nicotinate (mean difference (MD) -0.90 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.13 to -0.68) . Some herbal medicines may have cholesterol-lowering effects. Our findings have to be interpreted with caution due to high or unclear risk of bias of the included trials.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2011; · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    Mao Ling Wei, Jian Ping Liu, Ni Li, Ming Liu
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    ABSTRACT: Myopia (near-sightedness or short-sightedness) is one of the three commonly detected refractive (focusing) errors. Acupuncture is the stimulation of acupuncture points by various methods including needle insertion and acupressure. It is often used by traditional Chinese medicine practitioners to treat myopia in children. To assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in slowing the progression of myopia in children and adolescents. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 7), MEDLINE (January 1950 to July 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to July 2011), the Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) (January 1985 to July 2011), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2011), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrial.gov), the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) (The first issue to August 2010), the Chinese Biological Medicine Database (CBM) (1978 to April 2011), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1994 to April 2011) and VIP (1989 to April 2011). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, LILACS, mRCT and ClinicalTrials.gov were last searched on 9 July 2011. NCCAM was searched up to August 2010 and CBM, CNKI, and VIP were last searched on 6 April 2011. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that included any type of acupuncture treatment for myopia in children and adolescents. Two authors independently evaluated the search results according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two authors extracted and assessed data independently. We contacted the study investigator for missing data. We included two RCTs conducted in Taiwan with a total of 131 participants. We did not perform a meta-analysis as the trials were assessing different outcomes. Neither trial met our pre-defined primary outcome criteria of myopia progression defined as one diopter mean change. Only one trial reported the changes of axial length without non-significant difference among groups and both trials reported that several children experienced mild pain during acupuncture stimulation. Two trials are included in this review but no conclusions can be drawn for the benefit of co-acupressure for slowing progress of myopia in children. Further evidence in the form of RCTs are needed before any recommendations can be made for the use of acupuncture treatment in clinical use. These trials should compare acupuncture to placebo and have large sample sizes. Other types of acupuncture (such as auricular acupuncture) should be explored further as well as compliance with treatment for at least six months or longer. Axial length elongation of the eye should be investigated for at least one year. The potential to reduce/eliminate pain from acupuncture experienced by children should also be reviewed.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2011; · 5.70 Impact Factor
  • Yun Xia, Jian Ping Liu, Christian Gluud
    01/2011;
  • 01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterised by the clinical signs of oligo-amenorrhoea (infrequent or very light menstruation), infertility (failure to conceive), and hirsutism (excessive hair growth). Whilst Aleem 1987 revealed the presence of beta-endorphin in the follicular fluid of both normal and polycystic ovaries, Petraglia 1987 demonstrated that the beta-endorphin levels in ovarian follicular fluid of otherwise healthy women who were undergoing ovulation were much higher than the levels measured in plasma. Given that acupuncture has an impact on beta-endorphin production, which may affect gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, it is postulated that acupuncture may have a role in ovulation induction and fertility. To assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Relevant studies were identified from the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE® In-Process and other non-indexed citations, Ovid MEDLINE® Daily and Ovid MEDLINE(R), EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (including the Chinese journal full-text database (CJFD)), Chinese BioMedical Literature Database (CBM), VIP database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, China's important Conference Papers Database, and the China dissertation database. Truly randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that studied the efficacy of acupuncture treatment for infertility in women with PCOS. We excluded quasi- or pseudo-RCTs. We aimed to extract data independently by three authors using a piloted data extraction form. Data on study characteristics including methods, participants, interventions, and outcomes would be extracted. Crossover trials were not included unless there were first-phase data provided. Non-randomised controlled studies have been excluded. No truly randomised controlled trials of acupuncture for PCOS were found . The current conventional medical treatments for women with PCOS are prescription medications, surgery, and lifestyle changes. Associated problems with current western therapies are the cost, risk of multiple pregnancies, undesirable side effects, and inconsistent effectiveness. Non-randomised acupuncture studies in PCOS have suggested a low associated adverse events rate, no increased risk of multiple pregnancies, and that it is inexpensive. However, there no RCTs have been performed in this area thus far. Therefore, properly designed RCTs are required before a conclusive statement can be drawn to support the use of acupuncture in the management of PCOS.
    Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online) 01/2011; · 5.70 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

128 Citations
136.03 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2013
    • Shenzhen Second People's Hospital
      Shen-ch’üan-shih, Zhejiang Sheng, China
  • 2009–2013
    • Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and Pharmacology
      • Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2011
    • University of New South Wales
      • Faculty of Medicine
      Kensington, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2008
    • Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention
      Shen-ch’üan-shih, Zhejiang Sheng, China
  • 2006
    • Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine
      Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China