Jianhua Qin

Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States

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Publications (6)28.84 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Human adenovirus type-36 (HAdV-36) is a specific pathogen that may lead to increased adiposity and obesity. In order to evaluate the effects of HAdV-36 on gene transcription, a microarray analysis of muscle cells infected with HAdV-36 was performed. Gene expression profile was determined by microarray analysis in cultured human skeletal muscle cells with or without HAdV-36 infection. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay was performed in selected 35 genes to verify the results of the microarray analysis. A total of 13,060 unique genes were detected in the HAdV-36 infected muscle cells infected with HAdV-36. Among them, 1,004 genes were significantly altered by using a cut-off point at fold change ≥1.5 and P value <0.05. Most of the principal 100 altered genes were involved in development, immune response, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation as well as carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Thirty-two genes (91.4%) from the 35 selected genes were confirmed by qPCR assay. In addition, HAdV-36 altered 252 genes that are associated with cancer. The study showed HAdV-36 infection upregulated host cell antiviral defense. HAdV-36 also induces changes in gene expression related to cellular signaling pathways of signal transduction, transcriptional regulation as well as carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. However, it remains to be investigated if HAdV-36 infection could lead to oncogenesis.
    Journal of Medical Virology 08/2012; 84(8):1254-66. · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of chromium (Cr) supplementation on metabolic parameters in a cohort of type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects representing a wide phenotype range and to evaluate changes in "responders" and "nonresponders." After preintervention testing to assess glycemia, insulin sensitivity (assessed by euglycemic clamps), Cr status, and body composition, subjects were randomized in a double-blind fashion to placebo or 1000 microg Cr. A substudy was performed to evaluate 24-hour energy balance/substrate oxidation and myocellular/intrahepatic lipid content. There was not a consistent effect of Cr supplementation to improve insulin action across all phenotypes. Insulin sensitivity was negatively correlated to soleus and tibialis muscle intramyocellular lipids and intrahepatic lipid content. Myocellular lipids were significantly lower in subjects randomized to Cr. At preintervention, responders, defined as insulin sensitivity change from baseline of at least 10% or greater, had significantly lower insulin sensitivity and higher fasting glucose and A(1c) when compared with placebo and nonresponders, that is, insulin sensitivity change from baseline of less than 10%. Clinical response was significantly correlated (P < .001) to the baseline insulin sensitivity, fasting glucose, and A(1c). There was no difference in Cr status between responder and nonresponders. Clinical response to Cr is more likely in insulin-resistant subjects who have more elevated fasting glucose and A(1c) levels. Chromium may reduce myocellular lipids and enhance insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus who do respond clinically independent of effects on weight or hepatic glucose production. Thus, modulation of lipid metabolism by Cr in peripheral tissues may represent a novel mechanism of action.
    Metabolism: clinical and experimental 12/2009; 59(5):755-62. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to retard aging processes, extend maximal life span, and consistently increase insulin action in experimental animals. The mechanism by which CR enhances insulin action, specifically in higher species, is not precisely known. We sought to examine insulin receptor signaling and transcriptional alterations in skeletal muscle of nonhuman primates subjected to CR over a 4-year period. At baseline, 32 male adult cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were randomized to an ad libitum (AL) diet or to 30% CR. Dietary intake, body weight, and insulin sensitivity were obtained at routine intervals over 4 years. At the end of the study, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed and skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) was obtained in the basal and insulin-stimulated states for insulin receptor signaling and gene expression profiling. CR significantly increased whole-body insulin-mediated glucose disposal compared with AL diet and increased insulin receptor signaling, i.e., insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, insulin receptor phosphorylation, and IRS-associated PI 3-kinase activity in skeletal muscle (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively). Gene expression for insulin signaling proteins, i.e., IRS-1 and IRS-2, were not increased with CR, although a significant increase in protein abundance was noted. Components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, i.e., 20S and 19S proteasome subunit abundance and 20S proteasome activity, were significantly decreased by CR. CR increases insulin sensitivity on a whole-body level and enhances insulin receptor signaling in this higher species. CR in cynomolgus monkeys may alter insulin signaling in vivo by modulating protein content of insulin receptor signaling proteins.
    Diabetes 03/2009; 58(7):1488-98. · 7.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human adenovirus type 36 (Ad-36) increases adiposity but improves insulin sensitivity in experimentally infected animals. We determined the ability of Ad-36 to increase glucose uptake by human primary skeletal muscle (HSKM) cells. The effect of Ad-36 on glucose uptake and cell signaling was determined in HSKM cells obtained from type 2 diabetic and healthy lean subjects. Ad-2, another human adenovirus, was used as a negative control. Gene expression and proteins of GLUT1 and GLUT4 were measured by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Role of insulin and Ras signaling pathways was determined in Ad-36-infected HSKM cells. Ad-36 and Ad-2 infections were confirmed by the presence of respective viral mRNA and protein expressions. In a dose-dependent manner, Ad-36 significantly increased glucose uptake in diabetic and nondiabetic HSKM cells. Ad-36 increased gene expression and protein abundance of GLUT1 and GLUT4, GLUT4 translocation to plasma membrane, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity in an insulin-independent manner. In fact, Ad-36 decreased insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation and IRS-1-and IRS-2-associated PI 3-kinase activities. On the other hand, Ad-36 increased Ras gene expression and protein abundance, and Ras siRNA abrogated Ad-36-induced PI 3-kinase activation, GLUT4 protein abundance, and glucose uptake. These effects were not observed with Ad-2 infection. Ad-36 infection increases glucose uptake in HSKM cells via Ras-activated PI 3-kinase pathway in an insulin-independent manner. These findings may provide impetus to exploit the role of Ad-36 proteins as novel therapeutic targets for improving glucose handling.
    Diabetes 08/2008; 57(7):1805-13. · 7.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects of 3 types of dietary fibers -- sugarcane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY), and cellulose (CEL) -- on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism, and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet-fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into 4 groups that consumed high-fat diet alone (HFD) or high-fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL, respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin, and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were reevaluated at the end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in the CEL group at the end of study. No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under the curve of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was 2-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin messenger RNA levels of stomach in the SCF group were significantly lower than in the CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model because high-fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression.
    Metabolism 01/2008; 56(12):1635-42. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Considerable controversy exists regarding the use of chromium (Cr) supplementation to modulate carbohydrate metabolism in subjects with diabetes. Recently, we reported that Cr supplementation, provided as 1000 microg/d as Cr picolinate, enhanced insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our data agreed with some, but not all, studies that evaluated a similar dose and formulation in type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggested that subject selection and characteristics may be important considerations when assessing the clinical response. Thus, the goal of this study was to assess which metabolic or clinical characteristics, when obtained at baseline, best determine a clinical response to Cr when assessing changes in insulin sensitivity. Seventy-three subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus were assessed in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Subjects were assessed at baseline for glycemic control with glycated hemoglobin measures, oral glucose tolerance tests, and body weight and body fat measures (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry). After baseline, insulin sensitivity in vivo was assessed with the use of hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. After the baseline clamp, subjects were randomized to receive Cr supplementation (1000 microg Cr/d provided as Cr picolinate) or placebo daily for 6 months. All study parameters were repeated after 6 months. The relationship of the baseline characteristics of the study subjects to the change in insulin sensitivity was determined. Sixty-three percent of the subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus responded to the Cr treatment as compared with 30% with placebo. The only subject variable significantly associated with the clinical response to Cr was the baseline insulin sensitivity, as assessed with the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (partial R(2) = .4038) (P = .0004). Subject phenotype appears to be very important when assessing the clinical response to Cr because baseline insulin sensitivity was found to account for nearly 40% of the variance in the clinical response to Cr.
    Metabolism 01/2008; 56(12):1652-5. · 3.61 Impact Factor