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Publications (5)57.41 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Microalbuminuria is a risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) events. The relationship between the degree of albuminuria and CV risk is unclear. To estimate the risk of CV events in high-risk individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM) and without DM who have microalbuminuria and to determine whether levels of albuminuria below the microalbuminuria threshold increase CV risk. The Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation study, a cohort study conducted between 1994 and 1999 with a median 4.5 years of follow-up. Community and academic practices in North and South America and Europe. Individuals aged 55 years or more with a history of CV disease (n = 5545) or DM and at least 1 CV risk factor (n = 3498) and a baseline urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) measurement. Cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or CV death); all-cause death; and hospitalization for congestive heart failure. Microalbuminuria was detected in 1140 (32.6%) of those with DM and 823 (14.8%) of those without DM at baseline. Microalbuminuria increased the adjusted relative risk (RR) of major CV events (RR, 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64-2.05), all-cause death (RR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.84-2.38), and hospitalization for congestive heart failure (RR, 3.23; 95% CI, 2.54-4.10). Similar RRs were seen for participants with or without DM, even after adjusting for other CV risk factors (eg, the adjusted RR of the primary aggregate end point was 1.97 [95% CI, 1.68-2.31] in those with DM and 1.61 [95% CI, 1.36-1.90] in those without DM). Compared with the lowest quartile of ACR (<0.22 mg/mmol), the RRs of the primary aggregate end point in the second quartile (ie, ACR range, 0.22-0.57 mg/mmol) was 1.11 (95% CI, 0.95-1.30); third quartile, 1.38 (95% CI, 1.19-1.60; ACR range, 0.58-1.62 mg/mmol); and fourth quartile, 1.97 (95% CI, 1.73-2.25; ACR range, >1.62 mg/mmol) (P for trend <.001, even after excluding those with microalbuminuria). For every 0.4-mg/mmol increase in ACR level, the adjusted hazard of major CV events increased by 5.9% (95% CI, 4.9%-7.0%). Our results indicate that any degree of albuminuria is a risk factor for CV events in individuals with or without DM; the risk increases with the ACR, starting well below the microalbuminuria cutoff. Screening for albuminuria identifies people at high risk for CV events.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 08/2001; 286(4):421-6. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many patients with congestive heart failure do not receive the benefits of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors because of intolerance. We sought to determine the tolerability of an angiotensin II receptor blocker, candesartan cilexetil, among patients considered intolerant of ACE inhibitors. Patients with CHF, left ventricular ejection fraction less than 35%, and history of discontinuing an ACE inhibitor because of intolerance underwent double-blind randomization in a 2:1 ratio to receive candesartan (n = 179) or a placebo (n = 91). The initial dosage of candesartan was 4 mg/d; the dosage was increased to 16 mg/d if the drug was tolerated. A history of intolerance of ACE inhibitor was attributed to cough (67% of patients), hypotension (15%), or renal dysfunction (11%). The study drug was continued for 12 weeks by 82.7% of patients who received candesartan versus 86.8% of patients who received the placebo. This 4.1% greater discontinuation rate with active therapy was not significant; the 95% confidence interval ranged from 4.8% more discontinuation with placebo to 13% more with candesartan. Titration to the 16-mg target dose was possible for 69% of patients who received candesartan versus 84% of those who received the placebo. Frequencies of death and morbidity were not significantly different between the candesartan and placebo groups (death 3.4% and 3.3%, worsening heart failure 8.4% and 13.2%, myocardial infarction 2.8% and 5.5%, all-cause hospitalization 12.8% and 18.7%, and death or hospitalization for heart failure 11.7% and 14.3%). Candesartan was well tolerated by this population. The effect of candesartan on major clinical end points, including death, remains to be determined.
    American Heart Journal 05/2000; 139(4):609-17. · 4.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the characteristics of diabetic and nondiabetic participants in the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) Study who are at high risk of developing cardiovascular (CV) disease and who have microalbuminuria (MA), and to identify the key determinants of MA in these two groups. Albuminuria was measured in 97% of patients enrolled in the HOPE Study as part of the MICRO-HOPE (MA, CV, and Renal Outcomes in HOPE) substudy. Baseline clinical characteristics of diabetic and nondiabetic participants with MA were recorded, and the univariate and multivariate relationship between these characteristics and the presence of MA was estimated for both groups. Baseline urinary albumin determinations were available in 3,574 (97.8%) diabetic participants and 5,708 (97.0%) nondiabetic participants. MA was detected in 1,151 (32.2%) diabetic participants and 837 (14.7%) nondiabetic participants. Age, waist-to-hip ratio, diabetes, smoking, hypertension, vascular disease, and left ventricular hypertrophy were independent determinants of MA in all participants. In diabetic participants, the odds of MA increased 16% for every 10.4 years of diabetes duration, and increased 8% for every 0.9% increase in glycated hemoglobin (assuming a GHb assay with an upper limit of 6% in the nondiabetic range). MA is independently associated with several risk factors for CV and renal disease in both diabetic and nondiabetic individuals at high risk for CV disease.
    Diabetes Care 05/2000; 23 Suppl 2:B35-9. · 7.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the effects of candesartan (an angiotensin II antagonist) alone, enalapril alone, and their combination on exercise tolerance, ventricular function, quality of life (QOL), neurohormone levels, and tolerability in congestive heart failure (CHF). Seven hundred sixty-eight patients in New York Heart Association functional class (NYHA-FC) II to IV with ejection fraction (EF) <0.40 and a 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) <500 m received either candesartan (4, 8, or 16 mg), candesartan (4 or 8 mg) plus 20 mg of enalapril, or 20 mg of enalapril for 43 weeks. There were no differences among groups with regard to 6MWD, NYHA-FC, or QOL. EF increased (P=NS) more with candesartan-plus-enalapril therapy (0.025+/-0.004) than with candesartan alone (0.015+/-0.004) or enalapril alone(0.015+/-0.005). End-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes increased less with combination therapy (EDV 8+/-4 mL; ESV 1+/-4 mL; P<0.01) than with candesartan alone (EDV 27+/-4 mL; ESV 18+/-3 mL) or enalapril alone (EDV 23+/-7 mL; ESV 14+/-6 mL). Blood pressure decreased with combination therapy (6+/-1/4+/-1 mm Hg) compared with candesartan or enalapril alone (P<0.05). Aldosterone decreased (P<0.05) with combination therapy (23.2+/-5.3 pg/mL) at 17 but not 43 weeks compared with candesartan (0.7+/-7.8 pg/mL) or enalapril (-0.8+/-11. 3 pg/mL). Brain natriuretic peptide decreased with combination therapy (5.8+/-2.7 pmol/L; P<0.01) compared with candesartan (4. 4+/-3.8 pmol/L) and enalapril alone (4.0+/-5.0 pmol/L). Candesartan alone was as effective, safe, and tolerable as enalapril. The combination of candesartan and enalapril was more beneficial for preventing left ventricular remodeling than either candesartan or enalapril alone.
    Circulation 10/1999; 100(10):1056-64. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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