J Treuner

Gesellschaft für Pädiatrische Onkologie und Hämatologie, Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

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Publications (207)907.73 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In this retrospective study of 62 children with ALL and 10 children with AML, data are compiled on the special aspects of a guarded indication for platelet transfusions; in Tubingen this indication is usually based solely on clinical signs of incipient or manifest bleeding at platelet counts below 11,000/mm3. This is in contrast to the practice most often used to transfuse platelets at counts below 20,000/mm3 for prophylactic reasons irrespective of therapeutic need. The guarded indication aims at keeping the rate of allosensitization by platelet transfusions as low as possible. Of all patients in remission induction of ALL and of AML, platelet transfusions were needed by 53% and 80% respectively; the mean platelet support was 2.9 units in ALL and 19.0 units in AML. In relapse, the need increased considerably. Of all patients with ALL, 11% were sensitized by platelet transfusions; lethal complications related to this guarded indication could not be seen.
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 07/2009; 1(1):51-58. DOI:10.3109/08880018409141709 · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Childhood rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a soft tissue malignant tumor of skeletal muscle origin, accounts for approximately 3.5% of the cases of cancer among children 0-14 years and 2% of the cases among adolescents and young adults 15-19 years of age. We evaluated survival (SUR) after first relapse depending on the time to relapse (TTR) in RMSs of childhood and adolescence. Early, intermediate, and late relapsing patients were evaluated for prognostic risk factors. Two hundred thirty-four patients with RMS enrolled in the German sarcoma trial CWS-81, CWS-86, CWS-91, and CWS-96 met selection criteria. Of the 234 patients, 35%, 32%, and 33% relapsed within 6 (early), 6-12 (intermediate), and more than 12 (late) months respectively after the end of primary therapy. Four-year SUR was 12%, 21%, and 41% for early, intermediate, and late relapse respectively (P < 0.001). Four-year SUR after local relapse was 18% (early), 38% (intermediate), and 49% (late). Embryonal RMS showed four year SUR of 16%, 30%, and 46% (P < 0.001) whereas alveolar histology showed four year SUR of 8%, 6%, and 23% (P < 0.01) for early, intermediate, and late relapse respectively. TTR has significant influence on prognosis in relapsed RMS. It influences SUR independent of other features such as type of relapse, histology, tumor site, primary treatment time or irradiation in primary treatment.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 07/2009; 52(7):772-6. DOI:10.1002/pbc.21906 · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To improve risk-adapted therapy for localized childhood soft tissue sarcoma within an international multicenter setting. Four hundred forty-one patients younger than 21 years with localized rhabdomyosarcoma and rhabdomyosarcoma-like tumors (ie, extraosseous tumors of the Ewing family, synovial sarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma) were eligible. Therapy was stratified according to postsurgical stage, histology, and tumor site. In unresectable tumors, treatment was further adapted depending on response to induction chemotherapy, TN classification, tumor size and second-look surgery. A novel five-drug combination of etoposide, vincristine, dactinomycin, ifosfamide, and doxorubicin (EVAIA) was evaluated for high-risk patients, but cumulative chemotherapy dosage and treatment duration were reduced for the remaining individuals as compared with that of the previous trial CWS-86. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) was recommended at doses of either 32 or 48 Gy. At a median follow-up of 8 years, 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall (OS) survival for the entire cohort was 63% +/- 4% and 73% +/- 4%, respectively (all survival rates in this abstract are calculated and displayed with +/-95% CI). EFS/OS rates by histology were 60% +/- 5%/72% +/- 5% in rhabdomyosarcoma, 62% +/- 10%/69% +/- 10% for Ewing tumors of soft tissues, 84% +/- 12%/90% +/- 10% for synovial sarcoma, and 67% +/- 38%/83% +/- 30% for undifferentiated sarcoma, respectively. Response to one cycle of the five-drug combination EVAIA was similar to that of the four-drug combination VAIA used in CWS-86. Two hundred twelve patients with rhabdomyosarcoma underwent radiation (EFS, 66% +/- 6%); 53 of those patients had a favorable risk profile and received 32 Gy of HART (EFS, 73% +/- 12%). TN classification, tumor site, tumor size, histology, and age were prognostic in univariate analysis. Improved risk stratification enabled decreased therapy intensity for selected patients without compromising survival. Intensified chemotherapy with EVAIA did not improve outcome of localized high-risk rhabdomyosarcoma.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 03/2009; 27(9):1446-55. DOI:10.1200/JCO.2007.15.0466 · 18.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We prospectively studied the efficacy of high dose therapy (HDT) versus an oral maintenance treatment (OMT) in patients with stage IV soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Both groups were pretreated with the CEVAIE combination consisting of carboplatin, etoposide, vincristine, actinomycin D, ifosfamide, and epirubicin. HDT consisted of a tandem cycle of thiotepa (600 mg/m(2)) plus cyclophosphamide (4,500 mg/m(2)) and melphalan (120 mg/m(2)) plus etoposide (1,800 mg/m(2)). This treatment was compared with OMT, consisting of four cycles trofosfamide (10 days 2 x 75 mg/m(2)/day) plus etoposide (10 days 2 x 25 mg/m(2)/day), and 4 cycles trofosfamide (10 days 2 x 75 mg/m(2)/day) plus idarubicin (10 days 4 x 5 mg/m(2)). Eligibility criteria were: diagnosis confirmed by reference pathology, primary stage IV, below 22 years of age, and having completed the study therapy. From 96 patients 45 were treated with HDT and 51 with OMT. The main risk parameters were equally distributed in both arms. After a median follow-up of 57.4 months, 11/45 (24.4%) patients in the HDT-arm and 26/51 (57.8%) patients in OMT-arm were alive. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated an overall survival for the whole group of 0.27 (OMT group: 0.52, HDT group 0.27, log rank P = 0.03). The proportional hazard analysis for patients with rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) or "RMS-like" tumors (77.1% of all patients) demonstrated an independent benefit of OMT on outcome. Oral maintenance therapy seems to be a promising option for patients with RMS-like stage IV tumors.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 04/2008; 50(4):739-45. DOI:10.1002/pbc.21494 · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evaluation of primary tumor-, treatment-, and patient-related factors predicting relapse pattern, risk, and survival after relapse with the aim to design a risk-adapted, tumor-directed surveillance program for patients with localized rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). One thousand one hundred sixty-four patients with nonmetastatic RMS achieved complete remission at the end of multimodal therapy in the consecutive trials of the Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studiengruppe (CWS)-81, CWS-86, CWS-91, and CWS-96 between 1980 and 2002 (median follow-up, 5 years). Three hundred thirty-seven of these individuals developed either locoregional, metastatic, or combined relapses. Predictive factors for relapse, its pattern, and postrelapse survival were analyzed. Age, histology, tumor size, tumor site, postsurgical stage, and omission of radiotherapy were identified as factors associated with an increased relapse risk in multivariate analyses. Relapse rates did not differ among the CWS trials. Median time to relapse was 1.43 years from first diagnosis (range, 0.13 to 13.5 years). There were 217 locoregional, 72 metastatic, and 48 combined recurrences. Only two patients developed metastases more than 4 years after diagnosis, and both had combined recurrences. Five-year postrelapse survival was 24%. Patient subsets with consistent relapse pattern, risk, and postrelapse survival rates were identified on the basis of histologic subtype and tumor size. Initial patient and tumor characteristics predict pattern and risk of relapse and also correlate with postrelapse survival probabilities. In localized RMS, tumor-directed follow-up should focus on the primary site. Screening for metastatic relapse may not be necessary more than 4 years after diagnosis. The identification of subgroups with distinctive pattern and risk of relapse may be used to develop risk-adapted, tumor-directed guidance for detection of recurrent disease in localized RMS.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2008; 26(3):406-13. DOI:10.1200/JCO.2007.12.2382 · 18.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ifosfamide is widely used in paediatric oncology, but its use is limited by nephrotoxic side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and risk factors of tubulopathy, with special emphasis on the influence of age, where different findings have been published so far. Five hundred ninety three children and adolescents treated for Ewing, osteo- or soft-tissue sarcoma (median age at diagnosis: 11.7 years) were prospectively investigated for nephrotoxicity in the Late Effects Surveillance System (LESS) study. Tubulopathy was diagnosed in case of continuing hypophosphatemia and proteinuria. After a median follow up of 19 months, 27 patients (4.6%; 95% CI: 3.0-6.6%) had newly developed tubulopathy. This incidence was 0.4% (95% CI: 0-2.4%) in patients treated with a cumulative ifosfamide dose of < or =24 g/m2, 6.5% (95% CI: 3.6-10.7%) after 24-60 g/m2, and 8.0% (95% CI: 4.2-13.6%) after > or = 60 g/m2. In multivariate analysis, children younger than 4 years at time of diagnosis had an 8.7-fold (95% CI: 3.5-21.8) higher risk for tubulopathy than older patients. Neither carboplatin treatment nor abdominal irradiation showed any significant influence. Ifosfamide-induced nephrotoxicity was found in 4.6% of patients. Risk factors were the cumulative ifosfamide dose and young age at treatment.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 04/2007; 48(4):447-52. DOI:10.1002/pbc.20858 · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We determined the late sequelae in children and adolescents with rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder/prostate treated in the United States, Canada and selected Western European countries, primarily France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom, from 1979 to 1998. We used a data collection form to record data from patient records available at the group statistical centers. A total of 164 patient charts had sufficient data available to be included in the study. Median patient age at diagnosis was 2.4 years. Median length of followup was approximately 8 years (range 3 to 24). Of the patients with available data 78 did not undergo cystectomy, 49 underwent partial cystectomy and 34 underwent complete cystectomy. Urinary continence was assessed at age 6 years or older in 62 patients who did not undergo cystectomy. Of these patients 43 (69%) were continent, 16 had nocturnal incontinence and 9 had diurnal incontinence. Of 44 patients who underwent partial cystectomy and had pertinent followup data 32 (73%) were continent, and 12 had nocturnal and/or diurnal incontinence. Only 11 patients underwent urodynamic investigation. Other nephrourological complications consisted of 3 or more urinary tract infections in 29 of 53 patients, abnormal renal function in 19 of 48 (tubulopathy 14, increased creatinine/blood urea nitrogen 5), chronic hematuria in 13 of 51 and hydronephrosis in 8 of 54 with available data. Vesicoureteral reflux, urinary stones and bowel problems were infrequent. Of the patients 48% had a relatively intact bladder after biopsy only. However, 31% of patients 6 years or older had some urinary incontinence, as did 27% of patients who had undergone partial cystectomy. In addition, 55% of all patients had 3 or more urinary tract infections, 40% had decreased renal function and 25% had chronic hematuria. Other complications were present in 15% or less of the patients with available data.
    The Journal of Urology 12/2006; 176(5):2190-4; discussion 2194-5. DOI:10.1016/j.juro.2006.07.064 · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prospective longitudinal examinations of anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in a homogeneous cohort are rare in pediatric oncology. We herein report the results of observations on the frequency of cardiomyopathy in doxorubicin-treated sarcoma patients in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. The Late Effects Surveillance System (LESS) prospectively collects longitudinal data on late sequelae of antineoplastic therapy in Ewing-, soft tissue-, and osteosarcoma patients treated within the therapy trial protocols of the German Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology. Two hundred sixty-five relapse-free patients who had received doxorubicin for the treatment within the EICESS-92/EURO-E.W.I.N.G.-99, COSS-96, and CWS-96 therapy trials were serially examined by echocardiography. The analyzed population consisted of 142 males and 123 females. Their mean age at the end of therapy was 13 +/- 5 years. The mean follow-up time was 34 +/- 12 months. The mean cumulative doxorubicin dose was 290 +/- 91 mg/m(2). In this cohort, the total cumulative incidence of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy was 7.5%. Four patients (1.5%) suffered from a symptomatic cardiomyopathy and 16 (6%) from a subclinical cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy manifested in 11 cases already under antineoplastic therapy and in the remaining nine cases at a median of 26 days (range: 17-174 days) after stopping antineoplastic therapy. Univariate and multivariable analysis did not confirm any of the known risk factors for developing anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in our patient group within the described time interval. After a mean follow-up of 34 +/- 12 months, cumulative incidence of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in our pediatric sarcoma patients was at the lower end of that reported by other groups.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 04/2006; 46(4):489-95. DOI:10.1002/pbc.20492 · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is classified into two main subgroups: the embryonal (ERMS) and the alveolar (ARMS) form. The majority of the ARMSs are associated with specific chromosomal translocations (pARMS). Because ARMS is much more aggressive than ERMS, RMS subclassification has clinical relevance. However, diagnosis of RMS subgroups on the basis of histology or molecular biology can be difficult, and supplementing diagnostic methods would be desirable. The aim of this study was to establish a panel of markers for RMS subgroup classification by immunohistochemistry. Gene expression data were used for selection of subgroup-specific markers. Single sections of RMS with available expression data were used for establishment of the immunohistochemistry. Evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of the markers was carried out using a tissue array representing 252 RMSs. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were calculated for determination of differences in overall survival of the different staining subgroups. AP2beta and P-cadherin were selected as markers for pARMS, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibrillin-2 as markers for ERMS. EGFR + fibrillin-2 detected ERMS with a specificity of 90% and with a sensitivity of 60%. AP2beta + P-cadherin detected pARMS with a specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 64%, and allowed the detection of several misclassified tumors. The EGFR + fibrillin-2-positive group is associated with a favorable outcome, and the AP2beta + P-cadherin-positive group is associated with an unfavorable outcome. The presented set of marker proteins detects RMS subgroups with high specificity and may be useful in routine subtype classification of RMS.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 03/2006; 24(5):816-22. DOI:10.1200/JCO.2005.03.4934 · 18.43 Impact Factor
  • Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation 02/2006; 12(2):10-10. DOI:10.1016/j.bbmt.2005.11.035 · 3.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Up to now, cardiotoxicity of epirubicin has been studied almost exclusively in adult cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate epirubicin in children and adolescents, in comparison with doxorubicin. About 172 soft tissue sarcoma patients (mean age at diagnosis: 8.3 years), treated with epirubicin (median cumulative dose: 450 mg/m2) or doxorubicin (median cumulative dose: 240 mg/m2) within the high-risk group of the CWS-96 study, were examined in a prospective multicentre study. Heart function was analysed by echocardiography, measuring left-ventricular fractional shortening (FS). The median follow up was 27.7 months. Incidence of clinically manifest cardiomyopathy was 0% (0/60; 95% CI: 0-6.0%) in patients treated with epirubicin, and 0.9% (1/108; 95% CI: 0-5.1%) in patients treated with doxorubicin. A further three patients showed subclinical cardiomyopathy. There was no difference in FS between the two treatment arms. Cardiotoxicity was low in our study. For the short term, cardiotoxicity seems to be only a minor problem in patients treated with epirubicin as applied in this cohort.
    Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology 02/2006; 132(1):35-40. DOI:10.1007/s00432-005-0041-0 · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Differently from adult oncologists that considered synovial sarcoma (SS) a tumor with uncertain chemosensitiveness, since two decades pediatric oncologists in Europe assumed that chemotherapy played an important role in SS treatment, so most pediatric patients were included in rhabdomyosarcoma protocols, receiving adjuvant chemotherapy regardless of risk factors. The German and Italian groups reviewed the data of grossly resected SS patients in order to define a risk-adapted treatment program for the next European protocol. A total of 150 patients < 21 years with localized SS who underwent initial gross resection between 1975 and 2002 were the object of this study. All but four cases received adjuvant chemotherapy. Post-operative radiotherapy was administered to 50% Group I and to 92% Group II patients. Five-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 77% and 89%, respectively. Survival rates were influenced by tumor size (EFS 92% and 56% for size < or = and > 5 cm, respectively) and local invasiveness, not by surgical margins. No metastatic relapses occurred in Group I < or = 5 cm patients, while the outcome was poor for T2B patients (EFS 41%) due to a high rate of metastatic relapse. Our study was unable to assess the role of adjuvant treatments in grossly-resected SS, but identified a subset of low-risk patients (IRS Group I, size < or = 5 cm), for which the omission of adjuvant chemotherapy could be suggested, and a subset of high-risk patients (T2B), who need treatment intensification.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 01/2006; 46(1):11-7. DOI:10.1002/pbc.20502 · 2.56 Impact Factor
  • Treuner J, Brecht IB
    Pädiatrische Hämatologie und Onkologie., Edited by Gadner H, Gaedicke G, Niemeyer Ch, Ritter J, 01/2006: chapter Weichteilsarkome.; Springer.
  • J. Treuner, I. B. Brecht
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    ABSTRACT: Die Stadieneinteilung der Weichteilsarkome im Kindes- und Jugendalter erfolgt nach der prächirurgischen RNM-Klassifikation der SIOP (International Society of Paediatric Oncology), dem „grouping system“ der IRS (Intergroup Rhabdomyosarkomstudie) und der postchirurgischen histopathologischen Klassifikation der SIOP
    12/2005: pages 5514-5550;
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the value of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in children with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) and to identify risk factors associated with outcome. A total of 167 untreated eligible patients enrolled onto the Italian and German studies between 1975 and 1998 entered this analysis. Seventeen percent of patients had neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Chemotherapy was administered to 74% of patients; radiotherapy was administered to 38% of patients. With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 51% and 37%, respectively. The 5-year OS and PFS by Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) groupings were as follows: group I, 82% and 61%; group II, 62% and 37%; group III, 32% and 27%; group IV, 26% and 21%, respectively. Univariate analysis identified IRS groups, size, invasiveness, primary site, age, and presence of NF1 as prognostic factors; multivariate analysis identified absence of NF1, tumor invasiveness T1, IRS groups I to II and extremity of primary site as independent favorable factors for OS. A trend was observed toward a benefit from radiotherapy after initial gross resection. The overall response rate to primary chemotherapy, including minor responses, in group III patients was 45%. MPNST is an aggressive tumor for which complete surgical resection is the mainstay of successful treatment. Postoperative radiotherapy may have a role in improving local control in patients with minimal residual tumor. The reported responses to primary chemotherapy suggest that it may be effective in patients with tumor considered unresectable at diagnosis.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 12/2005; 23(33):8422-30. DOI:10.1200/JCO.2005.01.4886 · 18.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This analysis evaluates whether adjuvant chemotherapy can be recommended for high-risk, surgically-resected, adult-type non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas (NRSTS) within the new European Pediatric Soft Tissue Sarcoma Study Group (EpSSG) protocol. The Italian and German Cooperative Groups reviewed their data-bases, analyzing patients classified as group I-II, with high-grade tumor (G3) larger than 5 cm in size. The analysis included 36 patients, and compared the clinical features and outcome of the group of 21 patients who received chemotherapy versus the group of 15 patients treated with local therapies only. For the series as a whole, 5-year event-free survival (EFS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were 26.2%, 34.0%, and 37.5%, respectively. In patients treated with chemotherapy, MFS and OS were 49.5% and 41.5% (median time to relapse: 13 months). In patients who did not receive chemotherapy, MFS and OS were 0% and 23.8% (median time to relapse: 3 months). The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in NRSTS is still uncertain, however, the current retrospective analysis showed that: (1) despite the globally good prognosis of grossly-resected cases, patients with G3 and large-size have a high-risk of metastatic spread, and (2) MFS appears to be better in patients who had chemotherapy. Based in part on these results, and in accordance with recent suggestions coming from the literature on adult sarcomas, the EpSSG NRSTS protocol will recommend adjuvant chemotherapy in high-risk surgically-resected patients.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 08/2005; 45(2):128-34. DOI:10.1002/pbc.20376 · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the CWS 96 Study was to achieve an optimal treatment in children and adolescents with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) implementing a further refinement of risk-adapted allocation to chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. Treatment stratification was based on tumour histology, TNM status, postsurgical stage, localisation and age. Local tumour control was ensured by surgery and risk-adapted radiotherapy. From 1995 to 2002, 89 patients were registered in Austria. The 3-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival rates (OS) were 63% +/- 6% and 71% +/- 6%, respectively. 59/89 patients had localised RMS-like (rhabdomayosarcoma) STS (EFS 73% +/- 7%), 14 had localised NON-RMS STS (EFS 54% +/- 16%) and 15 patients had metastatic disease at diagnosis (EFS 33% +/- 12%), 1 patient had fibromatosis. The EFS rates at 3 years in patients with localised RMS-like tumours according to risk group were 92% +/- 8% for low and standard risk (12 patients) and 67% +/- 8% for high risk (47 patients). Favourable primary tumour sites of nonmetastatic RMS-like STS i.e. orbit, head/neck nonparameningeal or genitourinary non-bladder/prostate were diagnosed in 15 patients (1/15 patients died). In 44 patients with unfavourable localisation such as parameningeal, genitourinary bladder/prostate, extremity and others, 7 deceased. The 3 year EFS according to histology in patients with RMS-like STS was 61% +/- 11% for RME (embryonal RMS ) (28 patients) and 71% +/- 15% for RMA (alveolar RMS) (10 patients). The most common treatment failure was local relapse occurring in 21% of patients in the high-risk group. Risk-adapted individualisation of treatment led to a reduction of chemotherapy in the low and standard risk group without compromising survival. The outcome of RME and RMA was similar in this cohort of patients. These preliminary results after a median observation time of 2.5 years confirm the CWS 96 strategy.
    Wiener klinische Wochenschrift 04/2005; 117(5-6):196-209. · 0.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of the CWS 96 Study was to achieve an optimal treatment in children and adolescents with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) implementing a further refinement of risk-adapted allocation to chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. Methods: Treatment stratification was based on tumour histology, TNM status, postsurgical stage, localisa tion and age. Local tumour control was ensured by surgery and risk-adapted radiotherapy. Results: From 1995 to 2002, 89 patients were registered in Austria. The 3-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival rates (OS) were 63% +/- 6% and 71% +/- 6%, respectively. 59/89 patients had localised RMS-like (rhabdomayosarcoma) STS (EFS 73% +/- 7%), 14 had localised NON-RMS STS (EFS 54% +/- 16%) and 15 patients had metastatic disease at diagnosis (EFS 33% +/- 12%), 1 patient had fibromatosis. The EFS rates at 3 years in patients with localised RMS-like tumours according to risk group were 92% +/- 8% for low and standard risk (12 patients) and 67% +/- 8% for high risk (47 patients). Favourable primary tumour sites of nonmetastatic RMS-like STS i.e. orbit, head/neck nonparameningeal or genitourinary non-bladder/prostate were diagnosed in 15 patients (1/15 patients died). In 44 patients with unfavourable localisation such as parameningeal, genitourinary bladder/prostate, extremity and others, 7 deceased. The 3 year EFS according to histology in patients with RMS-like STS was 61% +/- 11% for RME (embryonal RMS) (28 patients) and 71% +/- 15% for RMA (alveolar RMS) (10 patients). The most common treatment failure was local relapse occurring in 21% of patients in the highrisk group. Conclusion: Risk-adapted individualisation of treatment led to a reduction of chemotherapy in the low and standard risk group without compromising survival. The outcome of RME and RMA was similar in this cohort of patients. These preliminary results after a median observation time of 2.5 years confirm the CWS 96 strategy.
    Wiener klinische Wochenschrift 02/2005; 117(5):196-209. DOI:10.1007/s00508-004-5-0285-8 · 0.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the impact of patient, tumor, and treatment-related factors on outcome in unselected patients with recurrent osteosarcoma. Five hundred seventy-six consecutive patients who had achieved a first complete surgical remission (CR) during combined-modality therapy on neoadjuvant Cooperative Osteosarcoma Study Group (COSS) protocols and then developed recurrent osteosarcoma were analyzed (median time from biopsy to relapse, 1.6 years; range, 0.1 to 14.3 years). There were 501 patients with metastases, 44 with local recurrences, and 31 with both. Metastases involved lungs (469 patients), bones (90 patients), and/or other sites (54 patients). After a median follow-up of 1.2 years for all patients and 4.2 years for survivors, actuarial overall survival (OS) rates at 2, 5, and 10 years were 0.38, 0.23, and 0.18, respectively. Five-year OS was 0.39 for 339 patients with and 0.00 for 229 patients without a second surgical CR (P < .0001). A long time to relapse, a solitary lesion, and, in the case of pulmonary metastases, unilateral disease and the absence of pleural disruption, were of positive prognostic value in uni- and multivariate analyses, as were a second surgical CR and the use of second-line chemotherapy. Radiotherapy was associated with moderately prolonged survival in patients without a second CR. The very limited prognostic differences associated with the use of second-line chemotherapy appeared to be more pronounced with polychemotherapy. Time to relapse and tumor burden correlate with postrelapse outcome in osteosarcoma. Complete surgery is an essential component of curative second-line therapy. Chemotherapy, particularly chemotherapy with more than one agent, may contribute to limited improvements in outcome.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2005; 23(3):559-68. DOI:10.1200/JCO.2005.04.063 · 18.43 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2005; 23(1):242-4. DOI:10.1200/JCO.2005.05.940 · 18.43 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
907.73 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2009
    • Gesellschaft für Pädiatrische Onkologie und Hämatologie
      Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    • Diabetes Clinic for Children and Adolescents
      Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Universitätsklinikum Erlangen
      Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany
  • 1985–2009
    • University of Hamburg
      • • Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
      • • Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
  • 1981–2009
    • University of Tuebingen
      Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2004–2008
    • Lund University
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden
  • 2006
    • University Children's Hospital Basel
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 2004–2006
    • Universitätsklinikum Münster
      Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2002
    • Klinikum Stuttgart
      Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 2001–2002
    • Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano
      • s.c. Pediatria Oncologica
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy
    • Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy
      • Department of Radiotherapy
      Villejuif, Île-de-France, France
  • 1994–1997
    • St Anna's Kinderspital
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
  • 1989–1991
    • University of Iowa Children's Hospital
      Iowa City, Iowa, United States
    • Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel
      • Institute of Phytopathology
      Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
  • 1986–1991
    • Universitätsklinikum Tübingen
      Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • 1988–1989
    • Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf
      Düsseldorf, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1982
    • University of Freiburg
      Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany