José Segura

Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Cordoue, Andalusia, Spain

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Publications (92)412.71 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To analyze the feasibility and safety of direct bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) implantation without previous balloon dilation. Lesion preparation through predilation is recommended before BVS implantation. There is no information on the routine use of direct BVS implantation. One hundred fifty-three patients with a total of 200 coronary lesions, were treated with BVS. A baseline intravascular ultrasound study (IVUS) was performed in 171 lesions (86%), and after BVS implantation, the quality of scaffolding was assessed with an additional IVUS (83, 41%) or optical coherence tomography (77, 38%). Elective predilation was conducted in 50 lesions. In 150 lesions, direct BVS implantation was attempted. In 129 lesions (86%), the BVS was implanted successfully, and in the remaining 21 (14%), direct implantation failed. In these cases, the scaffolds were retrieved and successfully implanted after balloon angioplasty. Longer and C-type lesions, and a larger plaque burden, were associated with failure to directly cross the lesion. Balloon postdilation was needed in 34% of the lesions. Ten patients (6.6%) had a periprocedural myocardial infarction. One patient (0.6%) died 60 days after BVS implantation due to thrombosis of the scaffold. At follow-up, target lesion revascularisation was needed in eight patients (5%). After 12 ± 3 months, the remaining patients were symptom-free. Direct BVS implantation is safe and feasible in most soft coronary plaques. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 08/2015; DOI:10.1002/ccd.26133 · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The possibility of strut fractures after bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) treatment is a new problem associated with the use of this novel technology. There is little in vivo information regarding the effects of lateral dilation on BVS. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of lateral balloon dilation after bioresorbable vascular scaffold implantation in the treatment of bifurcation lesions. From January 2012 to February 2015, 49 patients with bifurcation lesions who had been treated with BVS required balloon dilation of the side branch (SB). Optical coherence tomographic studies were performed in each of these patients. In 3 patients (6%), the optical coherence tomographic results met the criteria for rupture. Prolonged inflation using a noncompliant balloon with a diameter within the expansion limits of the device resolved the complication in all patients. The clinical course was favorable in all patients, and there were no inhospital deaths or myocardial infarctions. At 14 ± 8 months of follow-up, 2 patients with integrity of the BVS presented target lesion revascularization (4%). Another patient (2%) suffered a probable stent thrombosis 11 months after the procedure (myocardial infarction and death at home). The patients with the BVS rupture at the index procedure had a favorable clinical outcome, and the 6-month computed tomographic scan revealed maintenance of the initial good results. In conclusion, minor BVS rupture after 2.5-mm lateral balloon dilation may occur but is infrequent (6%). Prolonged balloon inflation of the main vessel may partially restore the geometry of the BVS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American journal of cardiology 07/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.07.015 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of the jailed guidewire technique is highly useful when treating bifurcation lesions by provisional stenting. However, at the time of withdrawal, the guidewire can suffer damage and even fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate structural damage in both polymer-coated and nonpolymer-coated jailed guidewires.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.recesp.2015.02.023 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of the jailed guidewire technique is highly useful when treating bifurcation lesions by provisional stenting. However, at the time of withdrawal, the guidewire can suffer damage and even fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate structural damage in both polymer-coated and nonpolymer-coated jailed guidewires. Between January 2011 and December 2012, an observational study was conducted using stereoscopic microscopy to evaluate 135 jailed guidewires (45 nonpolymer-coated and 90 polymer-coated) previously used in the percutaneous treatment of bifurcation lesions. Damage after withdrawal was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Age and sex distributions were similar in both groups of patients treated with polymer-coated and nonpolymer-coated guidewires. However, operators selected polymer-coated guidewires more frequently when treating more complex bifurcations and in diabetic patients. Some type of microscopic damage was observed in 25 of the guidewires analyzed (18%). Paradoxically, damage was more common in nonpolymer-coated guidewires (53.0% vs 1.1%; P<.001). None of the guidewires suffered complete fracture. Coronary guidewires that are jailed during the treatment of bifurcations using provisional stenting often suffer nonsevere microscopic damage. Although polymer-coated guidewires were used in more complex bifurcation lesions, paradoxically, they were damaged less frequently. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.
    Revista Espanola de Cardiologia 05/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.rec.2015.02.023 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) implantation in chronic total occlusion (CTO) could provide theoretical advantages at follow-up compared with metallic stents. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of BVS use for the percutaneous treatment of CTO by analyzing clinical outcomes and patency at midterm follow-up. From February 2013 to June 2014, 42 patients with 46 CTOs were treated by BVS implantation. Once the guidewire reached the distal lumen, all the occluded segments were predilated. Postdilation was performed in all patients. A multislice computed tomography was scheduled for all patients at 6 months. The mean age was 58 ± 9 years, 41 (98%) were men and 14 (33%) diabetic. The target vessel was predominantly the left anterior descending artery (22, 48%). According to the Japanese-CTO score, 21 CTOs (46%) were difficult or very difficult. Most cases were treated with an anterograde strategy (34 lesions, 74%). A hybrid procedure with a drug-eluting stent at the distal segment was the applied treatment in 7 CTOs (15%). The mean scaffold length was 43 ± 21 mm. Technical success was achieved in 45 lesions (98%), and 1 patient (2.4%) presented a non-Q periprocedural myocardial infarction. Re-evaluation was obtained in all patients at 6 ± 1 months. Two re-occlusions and a focal restenosis were identified. After 13 ± 5 months of follow-up, there were 2 repeat revascularizations (4.3%). Neither death nor myocardial infarction was documented. In conclusion, BVS for CTO seems to be an interesting strategy with a high rate of technical success and low rate of cardiac events at midterm follow-up in selected patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 03/2015; 115(11). DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.02.048 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background A simple approach is the predominant strategy for the percutaneous coronary intervention of bifurcation lesions. Performing side branch (SB) predilation in this context is currently a matter of controversy. In this study, we assess the efficacy of SB predilatation before a provisional T-stent strategy for bifurcation lesions. Methods Between February 2009 and November 2012, 372 patients with true bifurcation lesions were randomized to either predilation of the SB (n = 187) or no predilatation (n = 185) before main branch (MB) stent implantation and a subsequent SB provisional stent strategy. Results There were no significant differences between the patient groups regarding the baseline characteristics. After MB stent implantation, the TIMI flow of the SB was higher in the patients with SB predilation: TIMI flow 0 to 1; 2 (1%) versus 18 (10%), P < .001; and TIMI flow III; 179 (96%) versus 152 (82%), P < .001. Side branch stenting rates were 4% versus 3%, P = not significant. In addition, 60 patients (32%) from the SB predilation group presented SB residual stenosis by visual inspection <50%, and TIMI flow >= III did not require any additional treatment. The failure rate of SB rewiring, the time of rewiring, the number of wires used, and the incidence of major events were similar in both groups of patients. Conclusions Predilation of the SB resulted in improved TIMI flow after MB stenting and less indication to subsequently treat the SB. If rewiring of the SB is required, predilation did not hinder this maneuver.
    American Heart Journal 09/2014; 168(3):374-380. DOI:10.1016/j.ahj.2014.05.014 · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this study was to assess the immediate and long-term outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for in-stent restenosis (ISR) in an unprotected distal left main coronary artery (UDLM). PCI for UDLM-ISR can be complex. Limited information is available on procedural and clinical outcomes. Between May 2002 and February 2011, UDLM-ISR after drug-eluting stent implantation was observed in 79 of 1,102 patients (7%). Seventy-five were treated by repeat PCI using a simple approach (balloon/in-stent implantation) or a complex strategy (additional stent/double-stenting technique). A diagnosis of mild or severe restenosis was considered depending on the number of bifurcation segments affected (1 vs. >1). Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were defined as cardiac death, target lesion revascularization, and myocardial infarction. ISR treatment was performed using a simple approach in 44 (58%) patients, and using a complex strategy in 31 (42%). After 46 ± 26 months, the MACE rate was 22%. Patients treated with a simple approach had a lower incidence of MACE at follow-up compared with patients treated with a complex strategy, regardless of the restenosis extent (mild restenosis: 93% vs. 67%, p < 0.05; severe: 70% vs. 23%, p < 0.05). On Cox regression analysis, diabetes was the only predictor of MACE (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03 to 23.70; p < 0.05), whereas a simple strategy for ISR treatment was associated with lower risk (HR: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.79; p = 0.02). PCI for UDLM-ISR is safe and feasible, with a high rate of procedural success and an acceptable long-term MACE rate. A simple strategy, when applicable, appears to be a good treatment option, associated with a lower event rate at follow-up.
    JACC. Cardiovascular Interventions 01/2014; 7(2). DOI:10.1016/j.jcin.2013.06.017 · 7.44 Impact Factor
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    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 10/2013; 62(18). DOI:10.1016/j.jacc.2013.08.1328 · 15.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There have been significant advances in percutaneous interventions for congenital heart disease over the last 30 years. In this first article we will focus on ventricular outflow obstructions. Among left ventricular outflow tract obstructions, stent repair of coarctation of aorta and supravalvular aortic stenosis offer percutaneous solutions. Balloon valvuloplasty for aortic valve stenosis and balloon tearing of a thin discrete subaortic stenosis are also alternatives to surgery. Among right ventricular outflow tract obstructions, balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary stenosis is currently the gold standard for treatment. For homograft degeneration after surgery of the outflow tract, pulmonary valve implantation (Melody) may avoid further surgical interventions. Stent implantation for pulmonary branch stenosis is the treatment of choice for this congenital disease or post-surgical pathology.
    Cardiocore 07/2013; 48(3):102–112. DOI:10.1016/j.carcor.2013.05.002
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction and objectivesDifferent studies have shown improvement in patients with idiopathic nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy treated with cell-therapy. However, factors influencing responsiveness are not well known. This trial investigates functional changes and factors influencing the 6-month gain in ejection fraction in 27 patients with dilated cardiomiopathy treated with intracoronary cell-therapy.Methods Patients received intracoronary infusion of autologous bone-marrow mononuclear cells (mean infused, 10.2 [2.9]×108). Flow cytometry and functional analyses of the cells were also performed.ResultsThe 6-month angiographic gain in ejection fraction ranged from −9% to 34% (mean, 9%). These changes were distinguished into 2 groups: 21 patients (78%) with a significant improvement at the 6-month evaluation (mean gain, 14 [7]%), and 6 patients who had no response (mean gain, −5 [3]%). The responders were younger as compared to the nonresponders (50 [12] years vs 62 [9] years; P<.04). There was an inverse correlation (r=−0,41; P<.003) between the gain in ejection fraction and the high density lipoprotein level, suggesting higher functional gain with low high density lipoprotein levels. The 24 h migratory capability of the infused cells was significantly reduced in the responders’ group (5.4 [1.7]×108 vs 8.1 [2.3]×108; P<.009 for vascular endothelial growth factor and 5.8 [1.7]×108 vs 8.4 [2.9]×108; P<.002 for stromal cell-derived factor-1).Conclusions Younger patients with dilated cardiomiopathy and lower plasma high density lipoprotein levels gain greater benefit from intracoronary cell-therapy. Functional improvement also seems to be enhanced by a lower migratory capacity of the infused cells.Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 06/2013; 66(6):450–457. DOI:10.1016/j.recesp.2012.11.014 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Different studies have shown improvement in patients with idiopathic nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy treated with cell-therapy. However, factors influencing responsiveness are not well known. This trial investigates functional changes and factors influencing the 6-month gain in ejection fraction in 27 patients with dilated cardiomiopathy treated with intracoronary cell-therapy. METHODS: Patients received intracoronary infusion of autologous bone-marrow mononuclear cells (mean infused, 10.2 [2.9]×10(8)). Flow cytometry and functional analyses of the cells were also performed. RESULTS: The 6-month angiographic gain in ejection fraction ranged from -9% to 34% (mean, 9%). These changes were distinguished into 2 groups: 21 patients (78%) with a significant improvement at the 6-month evaluation (mean gain, 14 [7]%), and 6 patients who had no response (mean gain, -5 [3]%). The responders were younger as compared to the nonresponders (50 [12] years vs 62 [9] years; P<.04). There was an inverse correlation (r=-0,41; P<.003) between the gain in ejection fraction and the high density lipoprotein level, suggesting higher functional gain with low high density lipoprotein levels. The 24h migratory capability of the infused cells was significantly reduced in the responders' group (5.4 [1.7]×10(8) vs 8.1 [2.3]×10(8); P<.009 for vascular endothelial growth factor and 5.8 [1.7]×10(8) vs 8.4 [2.9]×10(8); P<.002 for stromal cell-derived factor-1). CONCLUSIONS: Younger patients with dilated cardiomiopathy and lower plasma high density lipoprotein levels gain greater benefit from intracoronary cell-therapy. Functional improvement also seems to be enhanced by a lower migratory capacity of the infused cells. Full English text available from:www.revespcardiol.org/en.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 03/2013; 66(6). DOI:10.1016/j.rec.2012.11.013 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Significant advancements in percutaneous interventions for congenital heart disease have been developed over the last 30 years. In the first article we analyzed ventricular outflow obstruction. In this second part, we will focus on heart defects and shunts. The percutaneous device closure of atrial septal and interventricular defects and the persistent ductus arteriosus in the main left-to-right shunts are safe alternatives to surgical closure. Also central and systemic-to-pulmonary fistulas may be closed percutaneously by specific devices. The right-to-left shunts, such as the patent foramen ovale or surgical fenestrations, can also be closed percutaneously. Finally, for severe left ventricular disfunction in infancy, cell therapy appears promising for the future.
    Cardiocore 01/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.carcor.2013.10.003
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the efficacy of sirolimus- and everolimus-eluting stents in patients with bifurcation lesions treated with provisional side-branch stenting. The efficacy of everolimus-eluting stents in bifurcation lesions has been poorly tested. Patients with all types of Medina bifurcation lesions were randomly assigned to treatment with either a sirolimus- (n = 145) or everolimus-eluting stent (n = 148). We included patients with main vessel diameter over 2.5 mm and side branches over 2.25 mm. Patients with diffuse side-branch stenosis were excluded. There were no significant differences between patients from the sirolimus and everolimus groups in terms of age, risk factors, clinical status, location of the bifurcation lesions or angiographic variables. Immediate results and in-hospital outcome were also similar in both groups of patients. In-hospital death occurred in two patients, one from each group. Target lesion revascularization was required in nine patients: four patients (2.7%) from the sirolimus group and five patients (3.4%) from the everolimus group. Late cardiac mortality occurred in two patients from the sirolimus group and in one patient from the everolimus group. Major cardiac event rates at 1 year were similar in both groups: nine patients (6.2%) in the sirolimus group and nine patients (6.1%) from the everolimus group (p: ns). In patients with bifurcation lesions, no significant differences in clinical outcome at 1-year follow-up were observed between sirolimus- and everolimus-eluting stent groups.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 12/2012; 80(7). DOI:10.1002/ccd.24281 · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung cancer is one of the most common neoplasms associated with cardiac metastasis and the pericardium is often affected. However, isolated myocardial involvement in these patients is very uncommon. Most tumor invasions into the heart are nonspecific and clinically silent. Myocardial metastasis rarely mimics an acute myocardial infarction. We report a case of a 59-year old man with a metastatic lung cancer into the myocardium who presented mimicking an acute myocardial infarction.
    The American journal of emergency medicine 12/2011; 30(9). DOI:10.1016/j.ajem.2011.10.010 · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Transluminal balloon tearing of the membrane in a thin discrete subaortic stenosis is an alternative to membrane surgical resection. However, the long-term outcome of patients with isolated thin discrete subaortic stenosis treated by transluminal balloon tearing remains unknown. This 25-year study describes findings from 76 patients with isolated thin discrete subaortic stenosis who underwent percutaneous transluminal balloon tearing of the membrane and were followed up for a mean period of 16±6 years. The age at presentation had a wide range (2-67 years). The mean age at treatment was 19±16 years. Immediately after treatment, the subvalvular gradient decreased from 70±27 to 18±12 mm Hg (P<0.001). No significant postprocedural aortic regurgitation was observed. After a mean follow-up time of 16±6 years, 11 patients (15%) developed restenosis, 3 patients (4%) progressed to muscular obstructive disease, and 1 patient (1.3%) developed a new distant obstructive membrane. Twelve patients (16%) were redilated at a mean of 5±3 years after their first treatment, and 4 patients (5%) underwent surgery at a mean of 3±2 years after their first treatment. Fifty-eight patients (77%) remained alive and free of redilation or surgery at follow-up. Larger annulus diameter and thinner membranes were independent factors associated with better long-term results. Most patients (77%) with isolated thin discrete subaortic stenosis treated with transluminal balloon tearing of the membrane had sustained relief at subsequent follow-ups without restenosis, the need for surgery, progression to muscular obstructive disease, or an increase in the degree of aortic regurgitation.
    Circulation 08/2011; 124(13):1461-8. DOI:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.019448 · 14.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Provisional side-branch stenting is currently the most widely accepted percutaneous technique for the treatment of bifurcation lesions. However, abrupt closure of the side branch may occur after main vessel stent implantation. Resolving side-branch stenosis under these conditions may pose major technical difficulties. We describe a new technique to resolve uncrossable side-branch occlusion following main-vessel stent implantation during provisional side-branch stenting. The technique consists of using the jailed wire to dilate the occluded side branch. We first use a low profile, 1.25-mm diameter balloon catheter. A regular balloon is then inflated through the same wire to open the side branch, crushing the proximal part of the main vessel stent. At this point, a second stent is implanted at the side-branch, finishing the procedure as an inverted crush stenting. The described strategy may be useful in cases of uncrossable side-branch occlusion causing severe hemodynamic impairment that cannot be swiftly managed with conventional methods.Full English text available from: www.revespcardiol.org
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 08/2011; 64(8):718-722. DOI:10.1016/j.recesp.2010.10.033 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Provisional side-branch stenting is currently the most widely accepted percutaneous technique for the treatment of bifurcation lesions. However, abrupt closure of the side branch may occur after main vessel stent implantation. Resolving side-branch stenosis under these conditions may pose major technical difficulties. We describe a new technique to resolve uncrossable side-branch occlusion following main-vessel stent implantation during provisional side-branch stenting. The technique consists of using the jailed wire to dilate the occluded side branch. We first use a low profile, 1.25-mm diameter balloon catheter. A regular balloon is then inflated through the same wire to open the side branch, crushing the proximal part of the main vessel stent. At this point, a second stent is implanted at the side-branch, finishing the procedure as an inverted crush stenting. The described strategy may be useful in cases of uncrossable side-branch occlusion causing severe hemodynamic impairment that cannot be swiftly managed with conventional methods.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 04/2011; 64(8):718-22. DOI:10.1016/j.rec.2010.10.034 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present report compared the incidence of 1-year clinical events in patients with bifurcation lesions that had been treated with a simple approach who were randomized to either a simultaneous final kissing balloon (KB) or an isolated side-branch (SB) balloon post-dilation. From February 2007 to December 2008, 293 patients with all types of Medina bifurcation lesions were enrolled in a prospective study. All patients underwent implantation of a sirolimus- or everolimus-eluting stent across the bifurcation and provisional SB stenting. Patients with no SB ostial compromise or those needing a second stent were excluded from the present study (n = 49). The eligible patients were randomly assigned to treatment with final KB inflation (n = 124, KB group) or isolated balloon after dilation (n = 120, non-KB group). No significant differences were found between the patients from the KB and non-KB groups in terms of age, risk factors, clinical status, or location of the bifurcation lesions. The angiographic data and immediate results were also similar in both groups. Four patients experienced a non-Q-wave acute myocardial infarction in the hospital: three (2%) from the KB group and one (1%) from the non-KB group. Two in-hospital deaths occurred in the non-KB group. Target lesion revascularization was required in 7 patients (3%): 5 from the KB group and 2 from the non-KB group. Late mortality occurred in 3 patients from the KB group and 2 patients from the non-KB group. The incidence of major events at 1 year (death, target lesion revascularization, or acute myocardial infarction) was similar in both groups: 11 (9%) from the KB group and 7 (6%) from the non-KB group (p = NS). In conclusion, no differences in the clinical outcome at 1 year of follow-up were observed between the patients with bifurcation lesions treated with a simple approach and either a simultaneous final KB or an isolated SB balloon post-dilation.
    The American journal of cardiology 03/2011; 107(10):1460-5. DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.01.022 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study investigated echocardiographic findings after 1 month in 22 patients who received a CoreValve prostheses to treat aortic valve stenosis. Particular attention was paid to the evaluation of valvular leaks and the left ventricular wall thickness. Echocardiograms were obtained prior to implantation, at discharge and 1 month later. The patients' mean age was 77 ± 4 years. At discharge, 16 patients (76%) had aortic regurgitation: 8 grade I and 8 grade II. At 1 month, only 13 (62%) presented with the condition: 10 grade I and 3 grade II, with 8 patients (38%) demonstrating a reduction of at least one grade (P < .005). The septal thickness decreased (from 14.2 ± 2 mm at baseline to 11 ± 2.4 mm at 1 month; P < .001), as did the posterior wall thickness (from 10.9 ± 2.4 mm at baseline to 8.3 ± 1.2 mm at 1 month; P < .001). In our patient series, the frequency and grade of residual aortic regurgitation after implantation of the CoreValve prosthesis decreased within 1 month, and favorable left ventricular remodeling was also observed.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 01/2011; 64(1):67-70. DOI:10.1016/j.recesp.2010.10.001 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report our experience with the Venture wire-control catheter in 20 patients with bifurcation lesions in which it was impossible to access the side branch using conventional techniques. This device was always used as a last resort and was employed during different stages in the treatment of the bifurcation lesions (i.e. initially, after stenting of the main vessel or both). In 17 patients (85%), use of the Venture catheter resulted in the success of the procedure. Only one complication associated with a monorail catheter was recorded. It was resolved successfully. One patient died from heart failure 10 days after the procedure and two patients, in whom it was impossible to access the side branch, had non-Q-wave myocardial infarctions. In conclusion, the Venture catheter was effective and safe, and enabled the side branches of complex bifurcation lesions to be accessed.
    Revista Espa de Cardiologia 12/2010; 63(12):1487-91. DOI:10.1016/S1885-5857(10)70283-8 · 3.34 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
412.71 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1991–2015
    • Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía
      Cordoue, Andalusia, Spain
  • 1999–2014
    • University of Cordoba (Spain)
      Cordoue, Andalusia, Spain
  • 2003–2005
    • Hospital Universitario "Doctor Negrín"
      Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain
  • 1991–1999
    • Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
      Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain
  • 1991–1993
    • Hospital Nuestra Señora del Rosario
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain