Jonathan Potter

Royal College of Physicians, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (19)53.63 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aim To obtain patient-generated data relating to the management of their chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Primary Care before hospitalisation with exacerbation. BACKGROUND: Previous audits of COPD have shown high rates of hospital admission and readmission. There is significant interest in understanding the reasons so that useful preventative strategies may be developed. As part of the 2008 UK COPD audit, which comprised 9716 cases of COPD admission across 97% of acute units, we obtained a sample of patient-generated data to assess understanding of COPD, use of healthcare resources, access to care and self-management in Primary Care prior to hospitalisation with exacerbation. We anticipated the data would provide useful insight for directing improvement strategies. Method A paper-based, anonymised survey was completed by patients identified as having exacerbation by participating hospital teams. Response rate was an estimated 46%. Findings Understanding and awareness of COPD was very variable. Patients noticed symptoms of COPD exacerbation, particularly change in sputum, for some time prior to hospitalisation but tended not to react promptly to these changes. A minority had self-care plans, many bypassed Primary Care Services and there was variable access to a named health professional or advice. Patients using home oxygen and nebulisers were at particular risk of admission. CONCLUSION: We conclude these sick patients use a lot of resources and the data suggest a need to support and educate them in the proactive management of exacerbation. There needs to be better 'exacerbation planning' so patients know how to recognise and treat flare-up but also whom to contact in the event of decline. Targetted support should be considered for the most vulnerable, particularly those using home oxygen and nebulisers, who have very high rates of hospitalisation.
    Primary Health Care Research & Development 04/2012; 13(4):395-402.
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    ABSTRACT: there is little information about the relationship between age and management of COPD exacerbation (AECOPD), although older persons are known to be at a greater risk of hospital admission. we have investigated responses from the clinical and patient questionnaire elements of the 2008 UK COPD audit, splitting the data into age decile. age ranged from 27 to 102. Patient-reported data suggested older patients had inferior knowledge of COPD, undertook less self-care and were less likely to recognise symptoms of exacerbation prior to hospitalisation. Clinician-reported data showed that although older patients had severe disease and symptoms, greater co-morbidity at presentation and higher mortality, fewer were seen in hospital or followed up subsequently by respiratory specialists. Older patients were more likely to have a DNR order signed within 24 h of admission, irrespective of co-morbidities or performance status. The observations were particularly applicable to those aged 80 or above. clinicians should consider increasing age as a specific risk factor in the management of COPD. Acute units and community teams should review carefully their protocols and pathways for how they assess, manage, discharge and follow-up older patients with COPD exacerbation.
    Age and Ageing 03/2012; 41(4):461-8. · 3.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The National Clinical Audit of Falls and Bone Health, coordinated by the Royal College of Physicians, assesses progress in implementing integrated falls services across the UK against national standards and enables benchmarking between service providers. Nationally, falls are a leading contributor towards mortality and morbidity in older people and account for 700 000 visits to emergency departments and 4 million annual bed days in England alone. Two rounds of national organisational audit in 2005 and 2008 and one national clinical audit in 2006 were carried out based on indicators developed by a multidisciplinary group. These showed that management of falls and bone health in older people remains suboptimal in emergency departments and minor injury units and opportunities are being missed in carrying out evidence-based risk assessment and management. Older people attending emergency departments in the UK following a fall are receiving a poor deal. There is an urgent need to ensure more effective assessment and management to prevent further falls and fractures.
    Emergency Medicine Journal 11/2011; 29(10):830-2. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate adherence to the urinary function assessments of the national falls guidelines for England and Wales. Secondary data analysis of the 2006 National Clinical Audit of Falls and Bone Health. Acute hospitals in the UK. Patients aged 65 years and older with a fragility fracture as a result of a fall. Data were analysed to determine whether patients with fragility fractures received an assessment of urinary function including continence status; whether impairment was detected and if action was taken to prevent continence related falls. 63% (2009) of 3184 patients were assessed for urinary continence following a hip fracture and 41% (817) of these identified a problem. 21% (1187) of 5642 patients with nonhip fragility fractures were assessed and a problem was found in 27% (316). Hip fracture patients were more likely (p<0.0001) to receive a continence assessment and have problems detected. Only about half of those with problems had any intervention or a referral to a continence service. Admission to hospital for nonhip fracture patients was a strong predictor of being assessed (p<0.0001). Rates of assessment and action for those with who fall and have continence problems are low despite current national guidelines.
    Maturitas 06/2011; 69(2):179-83. · 2.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peer review has been widely employed within the NHS to facilitate health quality improvement but has not been rigorously evaluated. This article reports the largest randomised trial of peer review ever conducted in the UK. The peer review intervention was a reciprocal supportive exercise that included clinicians, hospital management, commissioners and patients which focused on the quality of the provision of four specific evidence-based aspects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease care. Follow up at 12 months demonstrated few quantitative differences in the number or quality of services offered in the two groups. Qualitative data in contrast suggested many benefits of peer review in most but not all intervention units and some control teams. Findings suggest peer review in this format is a positive experience for most participants but is ineffective in some situations. Its longer term benefits and cost effectiveness require further study. The generic findings of this study have potential implications for the application of peer review throughout the NHS.
    Clinical medicine (London, England) 06/2010; 10(3):223-7. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: : Standards, benchmarking, and audits are integral to quality monitoring in health and social service provision. Recent policy in the UK National Health Service dictating the need for increased consumer involvement necessitates that service users have significant input into the composition of standards for quality of care. : To report the authors' recent involvement in research towards developing a set of agreed, measureable statements regarding quality in the provision of continence services using the views of older service users. : This article focuses on the third of a three-stage project to involve, identify, and incorporate the views of older continence service users in the development of standards of care in continence services. Whereas stage 1 developed a questionnaire with the assistance of service users, and stage 2 piloted this as a postal survey in two contrasting areas, stage 3 applied the tool in the context of face-to-face interviews with more vulnerable older people. The approach also included open-ended questions to elicit qualitative data around experiences of continence service provision. : Earlier stages of the project involved the relatively unproblematic construction of standards based on views given by experts and focus groups of older people. However, more in-depth, semi-structured interviews with service users brought to light the holistic, complex, and subjective way in which the sample viewed their experiences. : This study raises a number of questions over the efficacy of simple statements in capturing what is important to service users. If such standards are to empower patients usefully and assist professionals informatively in their provision of high-quality care, greater effort and sophistication is needed to truly reflect the needs and interests of service users. Alongside these concerns, however, there are potential ways of bridging the gap between standard setting and the lived patient experience.
    The patient 03/2010; 3(1):11-23. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To establish current physiotherapy practice in the secondary management of falls and fragility fractures compared with national guidance. Web-based national clinical audit. Acute trusts (n=157) and primary care trusts (n=146) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Data were collected on 5642 patients with non-hip fragility fractures and 3184 patients with a hip fracture. Those patients who were bedbound or who declined assessment or rehabilitation were excluded from the analysis. Results indicate that of those with non-hip fractures, 28% received a gait and balance assessment, 22% participated in an exercise programme, and 3% were shown how to get up from the floor. For those with a hip fracture, the results were 68%, 44% and 7%, respectively. Physiotherapists have a significant role to play in the secondary prevention of falls and fractures. However, along with managers and professional bodies, more must be done to ensure that clinical practice reflects the evidence base and professional standards.
    Physiotherapy 03/2010; 96(1):38-43. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2010; 138(5). · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report baseline data on the organisation of COPD care in UK NHS hospitals participating in the National COPD Resources and Outcomes Project (NCROP). We undertook an initial survey of participating hospitals in 2007, looking at organisation and performance indicators in relation to general aspects of care, provision of non-invasive ventilation (NIV), pulmonary rehabilitation, early discharge schemes, and oxygen. We compare, where possible, against the national 2003 audit. 100 hospitals participated. These were typically larger sized Units. Many aspects of COPD care had improved since 2003. Areas for further improvement include organisation of acute care, staff training, end-of-life care, organisation of oxygen services and continuation of pulmonary rehabilitation. Key Points: positive change occurs over time and repeated audit seems to deliver some improvement in services. It is necessary to assess interventions such as the Peer Review used in the NCROP to achieve more comprehensive and rapid change.
    BMC Health Services Research 09/2009; 9:173. · 1.77 Impact Factor
  • Adrian Wagg, Derek Lowe, Penny Peel, Jonathan Potter
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    ABSTRACT: systematic collection of clinical outcome data remains the most difficult task in the measurement of clinical effectiveness. However, the examination of the relationship between organisational and clinical process of care may provide a surrogate measure of quality in care. data from the 2006 National Audit of Continence Care for Older People were used to examine whether there was an association between organisational structure and standard of continence care for older people. 'Quality' scores were produced and the relationship between scores was examined. there were statistically significant correlations between organisational and process scores for continence care. Primary care scored higher than hospitals or care homes in regard to service organisation [median (IQR): 57 (45-68) vs 48 (36-65) vs 50 (38-55), P = 0.001]. Differences were less with clinical process scores for urinary incontinence (UI) [median (IQR): 42 (32-52) vs 40 (29-49) vs 43 (34-52), P = 0.06] and for faecal incontinence (FI) [median: 42 (34-53) vs 45 (36-55) vs 47 (41-53), P = 0.12]. those with an integrated service provide higher quality care to older people. The provision of high-quality care for continence appears to be dependent upon well-organised services with personnel who have the appropriate training and skills to deliver the care.
    Age and Ageing 09/2009; 38(6):730-3. · 3.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The standards of care for older people who present with a fractured neck of femur (#NOF) have been defined by previously published national guidelines. To assess compliance with these standards the Healthcare Commission commissioned the Clinical Effectiveness and Evaluation Unit (CEEU) for the Royal College of Physicians to deliver 'The National Clinical Audit of Falls and Bone Health for Older People'. The audit was developed by a multi-disciplinary team using available best evidence to set audit standards. All acute hospital trusts admitting orthopaedic trauma cases and all primary care trusts (PCTs) in England were recruited. Patients >65 years old presenting with a proven #NOF were included in the audit with a target of 20 cases per participating site. Data was entered for 3184 #NOF patients. 80% (2555/3184) were female with a median age of 83 years admitted from their own home (68% 2152/3184). Over 97% (3172/3184) presented to the A&E department on the same day as the fall (88% 2813/3184). The time in the A&E department was less than 2h in only 20% (640/3133) of cases with 23% (716/3133) having a stay of >240min. 35% (1080/3088) of #NOF patients were operated on within 24h of admission. Causes of delay to theatre included awaiting medical review (59% 566/956) or organisational reasons (29% 278/956). 48% (1480/2998) of patients were sat out of bed within 24h. Only 35% (1115/3184) of patients were cared for in an orthogeriatric setting. The median length of stay for the #NOF patients was 16 days with an interquartile range of 10-27 days. There are currently unacceptable wide variations in the delivery of clinical care to older people presenting with a #NOF. Of concern were the long lengths of time in A&E for many patients and the low level of routine access to pre-operative medical assessment. It is hoped that the launch of joint initiatives between the British Orthopaedic Association and the British Geriatric Society aimed at delivering service improvements in this area should lead to improved outcomes.
    Injury 07/2009; 40(11):1226-30. · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: the Department of Health report 'Good practice in continence services' highlights the need for proper assessment and management of urinary incontinence. The National Service Framework for Older People required service providers to establish integrated continence services by April 2004. A national audit was conducted to assess the quality of continence care for older people and whether these requirements have been met. the audit studied incontinent individuals of 65 years and over. Each site returned data on organisational structure and the process of 20 patients' care. Data were submitted via the internet, and all were anonymous. the national audit was conducted across England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Data on the care of patients/residents with bladder problems were returned by 141/326 (43%) of primary care trusts (PCT), by 159/196 (81%) of secondary care trusts (involving 198 hospitals) and by 29/309 (9%) of invited care homes. In all 58% of PCT, 48% of hospitals and 74% of care homes reported that integrated continence services existed in their area. Whilst basic provision of care appeared to be in place, the audit identified deficiencies in the organisation of services, and in the assessment and management of urinary incontinence in the elderly. the results of this audit indicate that the requirement for integrated continence services has not yet been met. Assessment and care by professionals directly looking after the older person were often lacking. There is an urgent need to re-establish the fundamentals of continence care into the practice of medical and nursing staff and action needs to be taken with regard to the establishment of truly integrated, quality services in this neglected area of practice.
    Age and Ageing 02/2008; 37(1):39-44. · 3.82 Impact Factor
  • Age and Ageing 10/2007; 36(5):582-4. · 3.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Faecal incontinence in older people is associated with considerable morbidity but is amenable to successful management. Quality standards in this area were previously subject to a pilot audit in primary, secondary care and care homes to allow providers to compare the care delivered by their service to others and to monitor the development of integrated continence services as set out in the National Service Framework for Older People. This study reports the results of the national audit. Data were returned by 141 primary care sites, 159 secondary care trusts (involving 198 hospitals) and 29 care homes. Data on the care of 3,059 patients/residents with bowel problems were analysed. Fifty-eight per cent of Primary Care Trusts (PCTs), 48% of hospitals and 74% of care homes reported that integrated continence services existed in their areas. Whilst basic provision of care appeared to be in place, the audit identified deficiencies in the organisation of services and in the assessment and management of faecal incontinence. The results of this audit indicate that the requirement for integrated continence services contained within the National Service Framework for Older People has not yet been met. Basic assessment and care by the professionals directly looking after older persons is often lacking. There is an urgent need to re-establish the fundamentals of continence care into the daily practice of medical and nursing staff, and undoubtedly, action needs to be taken with regard to the establishment of truly integrated, quality services in this neglected area of practice.
    Age and Ageing 06/2007; 36(3):268-73. · 3.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: National audit provides a basis for establishing performance against national standards, benchmarking against other service providers and improving standards of care. For effective audit, clinical indicators are required that are valid, feasible to apply and reliable. This study describes the methods used to develop clinical indicators of continence care in preparation for a national audit. To describe the methods used to develop and test clinical indicators of continence care with regard to validity, feasibility and reliability. A multidisciplinary working group developed clinical indicators that measured the structure, process and outcome of care as well as case-mix variables. Literature searching, consensus workshops and a Delphi process were used to develop the indicators. The indicators were tested in 15 secondary care sites, 15 primary care sites and 15 long-term care settings. The process of development produced indicators that received a high degree of consensus within the Delphi process. Testing of the indicators demonstrated an internal reliability of 0.7 and an external reliability of 0.6. Data collection required significant investment in terms of staff time and training. The method used produced indicators that achieved a high degree of acceptance from health care professionals. The reliability of data collection was high for this audit and was similar to the level seen in other successful national audits. Data collection for the indicators was feasible to collect, however, issues of time and staffing were identified as limitations to such data collection. The study has described a systematic method for developing clinical indicators for national audit. The indicators proved robust and reliable in primary and secondary care as well as long-term care settings.
    Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 01/2006; 11(6):533-43. · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bladder and bowel problems are common in the elderly and are associated with a considerable morbidity and impact on quality of life. Inequalities in service provision and access to services have been recognized but there has been no systematic approach to measuring the quality of continence care for older people. This study aimed to develop quality standards, to assess the reliability and utility of the resulting audit package and to report on the standards of care provided in primary care, secondary care and care home setting. Fifteen sites in secondary care, primary care and in long-term care settings were randomly selected to pilot the audit package. Data collectors completed audit questionnaires relating to the structure [organization] of care, the outcomes of care, and the process of care for 20 subjects with urinary incontinence and 10 subjects with faecal or double incontinence. The audit tool was reliable (median kappa score of 0.7). Access to integrated continence services, as defined by Good Practice in Continence Services was inadequate. Eighty-five per cent of hospitals had no written policy for continence care. There were deficiencies in obtaining information, in carrying out basic and specialist examinations and investigations and in determining the cause of incontinence. There was a high prevalence of catheter use in secondary care settings. The pilot has indicated significant inadequacies in continence care and demonstrates that in many sites the National Service Framework milestone for integrated continence services has not been met. A national audit of continence care is required to determine the extent of inadequate continence care.
    Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 01/2006; 11(6):525-32. · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: the National Centre for Health Outcomes Development has produced outcome indicators for the assessment of quality of care in the management of urinary incontinence. Three measures relate to the management of older people in long-term care: the prevalence of incontinence, the use of indwelling catheters and clinical assessment rates. to evaluate the recommended outcome measures in clinical practice. participating centres included residential homes, nursing homes and long-stay wards. We sent a structured questionnaire to each centre for qualitative assessment of the acceptability of the outcome indicators. We analysed data collected by nurses and other staff who used the urinary incontinence section of the Royal College of Physicians Continuous Assessment Review and Evaluation scheme audit tool for long-term care. there were 1125 residents in 17 residential homes, 14 nursing homes and five long-stay wards. The overall prevalence of urinary incontinence was 34% in residential homes (range 2-86%), 70% in nursing homes (38-100%) and 71% in long-stay wards (4-97%). Catheterization rates were 5% in residential homes (0-20%), 10% in nursing homes (0-44%) and 6% in long-stay wards (0-20%). Rates of full clinical assessment were 48, 24 and 36% respectively. there is great variability in these outcome measures within and between settings. Interpretation of outcome results requires more precise details on case-mix and the definition of outcome measures. Individual units found the audit tool helpful, but we advise caution with interpretation of outcomes between units.
    Age and Ageing 02/2001; 30(1):63-6. · 3.82 Impact Factor
  • Jonathan Potter, Adrian Wagg
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    ABSTRACT: Seventeen per cent of people over the age of 65 and 80% of people in care homes are constipated. Approximately 3-10% of older people in the community have faecal incontinence. Careful attention to assessment, based on an understanding of pathophysiology, will provide an explanation for bowel dysfunction. The causes are often multiple and may relate to local bowel pathology, systemic disease, complications of medication or functional disability. The possibility of underlying serious bowel disease must be borne in mind. Management should be directed to correcting the underlying causes. Laxatives, suppositories and enema use should be determined by the presence or absence of delayed transit and difficulty in evacuation. In the presence of dementia, a clear understanding of the physical and psychological disturbances present must be established to enable an effective management plan. Particular attention should be paid to the environment to promote privacy, comfort and dignity, as well as to enhance normal bowel function.
    Clinical medicine (London, England) 5(3):289-95. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • A Wagg, D Lowe, P Peel, J Potter
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    ABSTRACT: A number of policy documents have identified deficiencies in continence services in England and Wales, and have called for the development of integrated services. A national audit was conducted to assess the quality of continence care for older people and whether these requirements have been met. The audit studied incontinent individuals aged 65 years and older. Each site returned data on organizational structure and the process of 20 patient's care. Data were submitted via the Internet, all were anonymous. The national audit was conducted across England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Data on the care of patients/residents with bladder problems were returned by 141 of 326 (43%) Primary Care Trusts, 159 of 196 (81%) secondary/acute care trusts (198 hospitals), and 29 of 309 (9%) invited care homes. Fifty-eight percent of Primary Care Trusts, 48% of hospitals, and 74% of care homes reported that integrated continence services existed in their area. While basic provision of care appeared to be in place, the audit identified deficiencies in the organization of services and in the assessment and management of urinary incontinence in the elderly. The requirement for integrated continence services has not yet been met. Assessment and care by professionals directly looking after the older person were often lacking. There is an urgent need to reestablish the fundamentals of continence care into the practice of medical and nursing staff, and action needs to be taken with regard to the establishment of truly integrated quality services in this neglected area of practice.
    Journal of WOCN 35(2):215-20. · 0.93 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

102 Citations
53.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2011
    • Royal College of Physicians
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010
    • The Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry
      • Primary Care Research Group
      Plymouth, ENG, United Kingdom
    • University of Kent
      Cantorbery, England, United Kingdom
  • 2008–2009
    • University College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom