J Jones

Vaccine Research Institute of San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

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Publications (2)8.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Chronicity following hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may be maintained by high levels of viral proteins circulating in the serum. To examine the characteristics of T cells capable of co-existing with the secreted hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg), T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic (Tg) mice were produced. To insure that HBeAg-specific T cells would not be deleted in the presence of serum HBeAg, the TCR α and β-chain genes used to produce the TCR-Tg mice were derived from T-cell hybridomas from HBeAg-Tg mice. A TCR-Tg lineage (11/4–12) was produced that possessed a high frequency (∼67%) of CD4+ T cells that expressed a TCR-Tg specific for the HBeAg. As predicted, when 11/4–12 TCR-Tg mice were bred with HBeAg-Tg mice no deletion of the HBeAg-specific CD4+ T cells occurred in the thymus or the spleen. Functional analysis of the TCR-Tg T cells revealed that the HBeAg-specific CD4+ T cells escaped deletion in the thymus and periphery by virtue of low avidity. Regardless of their low avidity, HBeAg-specific TCR-Tg T cells could be activated by exogenous HBeAg as measured by cytokine production in vitro and T-helper cell function for anti-HBe antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, activated TCR-Tg HBeAg-specific T cells polarized to the Th1 subset were able to elicit liver injury when transferred into HBeAg or HBcAg-Tg recipients. Therefore, HBeAg-specific CD4+ T cells that can survive deletion or anergy in the presence of circulating HBeAg nonetheless are capable of being activated and of mediating liver injury in vivo.
    Antiviral Research 12/2001; DOI:10.1016/S0166-3542(01)00174-7 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronicity after infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) can occur for a variety of reasons. However, once established, chronicity may be maintained by high levels of viral proteins circulating in the serum. To examine the characteristics of T cells capable of coexisting with the secreted hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic (Tg) mice were produced. To ensure that HBeAg-specific T cells would not be deleted in the presence of serum HBeAg, the TCR alpha- and beta-chain genes used to produce the TCR-Tg mice were derived from T-cell hybridomas produced from immunizing HBeAg-Tg mice. A TCR-Tg lineage (11/4-12) was produced that possessed a high frequency ( approximately 67%) of CD4(+) T cells that expressed a Tg TCR specific for the HBeAg. As predicted, when 11/4-12 TCR-Tg mice were bred with HBeAg-Tg mice no deletion of the HBeAg-specific CD4(+) T cells occurred in the thymus or the spleen. Functional analysis of the TCR-Tg T cells revealed that the HBeAg-specific CD4(+) T cells escaped deletion in the thymus and periphery by virtue of low avidity. Regardless of their low avidity, HBeAg-specific TCR-Tg T cells could be activated by exogenous HBeAg, as measured by cytokine production in vitro and T-helper-cell function for anti-HBe antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, activated TCR-Tg HBeAg-specific T cells polarized to the Th1 subset were able to elicit liver injury when transferred into HBeAg or HBcAg-Tg recipients. Therefore, HBeAg-specific CD4(+) T cells that can survive deletion or anergy in the presence of circulating HBeAg nonetheless are capable of being activated and of mediating liver injury in vivo. The 11/4-12 TCR-Tg lineage may serve as a monoclonal model for the HBe/HBcAg-specific CD4(+) T-cell repertoire present in chronically infected HBV patients.
    Journal of Virology 09/2000; 74(16):7587-99. DOI:10.1128/JVI.74.16.7587-7599.2000 · 4.65 Impact Factor