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Publications (2)3.73 Total impact

  • PLoS ONE 07/2011; 5:e11397. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies suggest that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for cancer resistance to therapies. We therefore investigated how glioblastoma-derived CSCs respond to the treatment of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Neurospheres were generated from glioblastomas, characterized for CSC properties including self-renewal, cell differentiation and xenograft formation capacity, and analyzed for TRAIL-induced apoptosis, CASP8 genomic status, and caspase-8 protein expression. The neurosphere NSC326 was sensitive to TRAIL-induced apoptosis as evidenced by cell death and caspase-8, -3, and -7 enzymatic activities. In contrast, however, the neurosphere NSC189 was TRAIL-resistant. G-banding analysis identified five chromosomally distinguishable cell populations in the neurospheres. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the variation of chromosome 2 copy number in these populations and the loss of CASP8 locus in 2q33-34 region in a small set of cell populations in the neurosphere. Immunohistochemistry of NSC189 cell blocks revealed the lack of caspase-8 protein in a subset of neurosphere cells. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry of human glioblastoma tumors demonstrated the expression of caspase-8 protein in the vast majority of the tumors as compared to normal human brain tissues that lack the caspase-8 expression. This study shows heterogeneity of glioblastomas and derived CSCs in the genomic status of CASP8, expression of caspase-8, and thus responsiveness to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Clinic trials may consider genomic analysis of the cancer tissue to identify the genomic loss of CASP8 and use it as a genomic marker to predict the resistance of glioblastomas to TRAIL apoptosis pathway-targeted therapies.
    Apoptosis. 01/2011; 16(11):1150-64.