J F Brunet

Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (31)279.03 Total impact

  • C. Goridis · V. Dubreuil · J.-F. Brunet
    Autonomic Neuroscience 08/2009; 149(1):20-20. DOI:10.1016/j.autneu.2009.05.008 · 1.37 Impact Factor
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    V Dubreuil · M R Hirsch · A Pattyn · J F Brunet · C Goridis
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    ABSTRACT: In the vertebrate neural tube, cell cycle exit of neuronal progenitors is accompanied by the expression of transcription factors that define their generic and sub-type specific properties, but how the regulation of cell cycle withdrawal intersects with that of cell fate determination is poorly understood. Here we show by both loss- and gain-of-function experiments that the neuronal-subtype-specific homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b drives progenitor cells to become post-mitotic. In the absence of Phox2b, post-mitotic neuronal precursors are not generated in proper numbers. Conversely, forced expression of Phox2b in the embryonic chick spinal cord drives ventricular zone progenitors to become post-mitotic neurons and to relocate to the mantle layer. In the neurons thus generated, ectopic expression of Phox2b is sufficient to initiate a programme of motor neuronal differentiation characterised by expression of Islet1 and of the cholinergic transmitter phenotype, in line with our previous results showing that Phox2b is an essential determinant of cranial motor neurons. These results suggest that Phox2b coordinates quantitative and qualitative aspects of neurogenesis, thus ensuring that neurons of the correct phenotype are generated in proper numbers at the appropriate times and locations.
    Development 01/2001; 127(23):5191-201. · 6.27 Impact Factor
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    N Pujol · P Torregrossa · J J Ewbank · J F Brunet
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    ABSTRACT: An essential aspect of a neuron's identity is the pattern of its axonal projections. In C. elegans, axons extend either longitudinally or circumferentially in response to distinct molecular cues, some of which have been identified. It is currently unclear, however, how the differential capacity to respond to these cues is transcriptionally implemented in distinct neuronal subtypes. Here, we characterise a C. elegans paired-like homeobox gene, CePhox2/ceh-17, expressed in five head neurons, ALA and the 4 SIAs, all of which project axons towards the tail along the lateral and sublateral cords. Abrogation of ceh-17 function, while leaving intact many phenotypic traits of these neurons, disrupts their antero-posterior axonal elongation beyond the mid-body region. Conversely, ectopic expression of ceh-17 in the mechanoreceptors, several of which are known to pioneer their tract, leads to exaggerated longitudinal axonal outgrowth. Thus, ceh-17 is a novel gene involved in fasciculation-independent longitudinal axonal navigation.
    Development 09/2000; 127(15):3361-71. · 6.27 Impact Factor
  • John Jacob · M C Tiveron · J F Brunet · Sarah Guthrie
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    ABSTRACT: Axon navigation depends, in part, on guidance cues emanating from the target. We have investigated the possible role of the target in the pathfinding of visceral motor axons to cranial parasympathetic ganglia. Mice homozygous for a tau-LacZ transgene targeted in the Phox2a locus lack the sphenopalatine ganglion, which is the normal target of visceral motor axons of the facial nerve. We found that in these mutants, facial visceral motor axon pathfinding was disrupted, and some axons were misrouted to an alternative parasympathetic ganglion. Moreover, the absence of correct facial visceral motor pathways was concomitant with defects in the pathfinding of rostrally-projecting sympathetic axons.
    Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience 08/2000; 16(1):14-26. DOI:10.1006/mcne.2000.0855 · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    A Pattyn · M.-R. Hirsch · C Goridis · J F Brunet
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    ABSTRACT: Motor neurons are a widely studied model of vertebrate neurogenesis. They can be subdivided in somatic, branchial and visceral motor neurons. Recent studies on the dorsoventral patterning of the rhombencephalon have implicated the homeobox genes Pax6 and Nkx2.2 in the early divergence of the transcriptional programme of hindbrain somatic and visceral motor neuronal differentiation. We provide genetic evidence that the paired-like homeodomain protein Phox2b is required for the formation of all branchial and visceral, but not somatic, motor neurons in the hindbrain. In mice lacking Phox2b, both the generic and subtype-specific programs of motoneuronal differentiation are disrupted at an early stage. Most motor neuron precursors die inside the neuroepithelium while those that emigrate to the mantle layer fail to switch on early postmitotic markers and to downregulate neuroepithelial markers. Thus, the loss of function of Phox2b in hindbrain motor neurons exemplifies a novel control point in the generation of CNS neurons.
    Development 05/2000; 127(7):1349-58. · 6.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The closely related homeobox genes Phox2a and Phox2b are expressed in all central and peripheral noradrenergic neurons. Our previous results have shown that Phox2a controls the differentiation of the main noradrenergic center of the brain, the locus coeruleus, but leaves unaffected the other noradrenergic centers. Here, we report that Phox2b has a wider and overlapping role, in that it is required for the differentiation of all noradrenergic centers in the brain, including the locus coeruleus. Together with the previously reported lack of dopamine-b-hydroxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the peripheral nervous system of Phox2b knock-out embryos, our present findings make Phox2b a master regulator of all central and peripheral noradrenergic differentiation. We discuss the nonredundancy of Phox2 genes and their complex partnership with the bHLH transcription factor Mash1, which is also required for the differentiation of most noradrenergic cell types.
    Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience 04/2000; 15(3):235-43. DOI:10.1006/mcne.1999.0826 · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • A Pattyn · X Morin · H Cremer · C Goridis · J F Brunet
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    ABSTRACT: The sympathetic, parasympathetic and enteric ganglia are the main components of the peripheral autonomic nervous system, and are all derived from the neural crest. The factors needed for these structures to develop include the transcription factor Mash1, the glial-derived neurotrophic factor GNDF and its receptor subunits, and the neuregulin signalling system, each of which is essential for the differentiation and survival of subsets of autonomic neurons. Here we show that all autonomic ganglia fail to form properly and degenerate in mice lacking the homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b, as do the three cranial sensory ganglia that are part of the autonomic reflex circuits. In the anlagen of the enteric nervous system and the sympathetic ganglia, Phox2b is needed for the expression of the GDNF-receptor subunit Ret and for maintaining Mash1 expression. Mutant ganglionic anlagen also fail to switch on the genes that encode two enzymes needed for the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter noradrenaline, dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and tyrosine hydroxylase, demonstrating that Phox2b regulates the noradrenergic phenotype in vertebrates.
    Nature 06/1999; 399(6734):366-70. DOI:10.1038/20700 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated the specification of noradrenergic neurotransmitter identity in neural crest stem cells (NCSCs). Retroviral expression of both wild-type and dominant-negative forms of the paired homeodomain transcription factor Phox2a indicates a crucial and direct role for this protein (and/or the closely related Phox2b) in the regulation of endogenous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta hydroxylase (DBH) gene expression in these cells. In collaboration with cAMP, Phox2a can induce expression of TH but not of DBH or of panneuronal genes. Phox2 proteins are, moreover, necessary for the induction of both TH and DBH by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) (which induces Phox2a/b) and forskolin. They are also necessary for neuronal differentiation. These data suggest that Phox2a/b coordinates the specification of neurotransmitter identity and neuronal fate by cooperating environmental signals in sympathetic neuroblasts.
    Neuron 05/1999; 22(4):693-705. DOI:10.1016/S0896-6273(00)80729-1 · 15.98 Impact Factor
  • Christo Goridis · J F Brunet
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    ABSTRACT: The specification of neurotransmitter phenotype is an important aspect of neuronal fate determination. Recent studies have begun to define essential transcriptional regulators involved in controlling the mode of neurotransmission in vertebrates and invertebrates, and to examine their regulation by cell-extrinsic factors. An emerging concept is that the control of transmitter choice is intimately linked to that of other aspects of the neuronal phenotype.
    Current Opinion in Neurobiology 03/1999; 9(1):47-53. DOI:10.1016/S0959-4388(99)80006-3 · 6.77 Impact Factor
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    M R Hirsch · M C Tiveron · F Guillemot · J F Brunet · C Goridis
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    ABSTRACT: Mash1, a mammalian homologue of the Drosophila proneural genes of the achaete-scute complex, is transiently expressed throughout the developing peripheral autonomic nervous system and in subsets of cells in the neural tube. In the mouse, targeted mutation of Mash1 has revealed a role in the development of parts of the autonomic nervous system and of olfactory neurons, but no discernible phenotype in the brain has been reported. Here, we show that the adrenergic and noradrenergic centres of the brain are missing in Mash1 mutant embryos, whereas most other brainstem nuclei are preserved. Indeed, the present data together with the previous results show that, except in cranial sensory ganglia, Mash1 function is essential for the development of all central and peripheral neurons that express noradrenergic traits transiently or permanently. In particular, we show that, in the absence of MASH1, these neurons fail to initiate expression of the noradrenaline biosynthetic enzyme dopamine beta-hydroxylase. We had previously shown that all these neurons normally express the homeodomain transcription factor Phox2a, a positive regulator of the dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene and that a subset of them depend on it for their survival. We now report that expression of Phox2a is abolished or massively altered in the Mash1-/- mutants, both in the noradrenergic centres of the brain and in peripheral autonomic ganglia. These results suggest that MASH1 controls noradrenergic differentiation at least in part by controlling expression of Phox2a and point to fundamental homologies in the genetic circuits that determine the noradrenergic phenotype in the central and peripheral nervous system.
    Development 03/1998; 125(4):599-608. · 6.27 Impact Factor
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    A Pattyn · X Morin · H Cremer · C Goridis · J F Brunet
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    ABSTRACT: Recent evidence suggests that specific families of homeodomain transcription factors control the generation and survival of distinct neuronal types. We had previously characterized the homeobox gene Phox2a, which is expressed in differentiating neurons of the central and peripheral autonomic nervous system as well as in motor nuclei of the hindbrain. Targeted deletion of the Phox2a gene affects part of the structures in which it is expressed: the locus coeruleus, visceral sensory and parasympathetic ganglia and, as we show here, the nuclei of the IIIrd and IVth cranial nerves. We now report on the characterization of Phox2b, a close relative of Phox2a, with an identical homeodomain. Phox2a and Phox2b are co-expressed at most sites, therefore suggesting a broader role for Phox2 genes in the specification of the autonomic nervous system and cranial motor nuclei than revealed by the Phox2a knock-out mice. A detailed analysis of the relative timing of Phox2a and Phox2b expression at various sites suggests positive cross-regulations, which are substantiated by the loss of Phox2b expression in cranial ganglia of Phox2a-deficient mice. In the major part of the rhombencephalon, Phox2b expression precedes that of Phox2a and starts in the proliferative neuroepithelium, in a pattern strikingly restricted on the dorsoventral axis and at rhombomeric borders. This suggests that Phox2b links early patterning events to the differentiation of defined neuronal populations in the hindbrain.
    Development 11/1997; 124(20):4065-75. · 6.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mouse Otlx2 gene is a new member of the paired-like family of homeobox genes whose human homologue, RIEG, is involved in Rieger syndrome, an autosomal-dominant disorder. One of the cardinal features of Rieger syndrome is dental hypoplasia, indicating that Otlx2/RIEG activity is essential for normal tooth development. Here, we analyzed the expression of Otlx2 during mouse tooth development and studied its regulation in dental explants. Otlx2 expression distinguishes stomatodeal from other ectoderm as early as Embryonic Day 8.5, well before tooth initiation. Thereafter, its craniofacial expression becomes restricted to the tooth-forming areas and to the epithelial components of molar and incisor primordia. Although Otlx2 induction precedes the specification of odontogenic mesenchyme, tissue recombination experiments show that the maintenance of its expression requires signals from the mesenchyme and that dental mesenchyme has the capacity to induce ectopic expression of Otlx2 in nondental epithelium. Finally, we compare Otlx2 expression with that of the recently identified homeodomain transcription factor Barx1 expressed in molar mesenchyme. Their strictly complementary expression patterns in the epithelial and mesenchymal components suggest that both genes participate in the reciprocal tissue interactions which are a hallmark of odontogenesis.
    Developmental Biology 10/1997; 189(2):275-84. DOI:10.1006/dbio.1997.8672 · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Phox2a is a vertebrate homeodomain protein expressed in subsets of differentiating neurons. Here, we show that it is essential for proper development of the locus coeruleus, a subset of sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia and the VIIth, IXth, and Xth cranial sensory ganglia. In the sensory ganglia, we have identified two differentiation blocks in Phox2a-/- mice. First, the transient expression of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase in neuroblasts is abolished, providing evidence that Phox2a controls noradrenergic traits in vivo. Second, the expression of the GDNF receptor subunit Ret is dramatically reduced, and there is a massive increase in apoptosis of ganglion cells, which are known to depend on GDNF in vivo. Therefore, Phox2a appears to regulate conventional differentiation traits and the ability of neurons to respond to essential survival factors.
    Neuron 04/1997; 18(3):411-23. DOI:10.1016/S0896-6273(00)81242-8 · 15.98 Impact Factor
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    M C Tiveron · M R Hirsch · J F Brunet
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    ABSTRACT: Many transcription factors, and most prominently among them, homeodomain proteins, are expressed in specific groups of cells in the developing nervous system in patterns that suggest their involvement in neural fate determination. How various aspects of neural identity are controlled by such transcription factors, or sets of them, is still mostly unknown. It has been shown previously that Phox2 is such a homeodomain protein, expressed exclusively in differentiated groups of neurons or their precursors, and that its expression correlated with that of the noradrenaline synthesis enzyme dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. Here we confirm this striking correlation at the single-cell level with the use of an anti-Phox2 antibody. Moreover, we uncover a second, nonmutually exclusive correlative clue to the Phox2 expression pattern: a high proportion of Phox2-expressing cells are involved in, or located in areas involved in, synaptic circuits, i.e., that of the medullary control reflexes of autonomic functions. This suggests that Phox2 could be involved in the establishment of these circuits.
    The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 01/1997; 16(23):7649-60. · 6.75 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience 07/1996; 14:80-80. DOI:10.1016/0736-5748(96)80314-5 · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The vertebrate nervous system forms by the specification of, successively, neuroepithelial regions and cell groups. One of the proposed major histogenic steps is the subdivision of the neural tube in compartments along its caudorostral and dorsoventral axis. This event is reflected, and may be directed, by the restricted expression of many transcription factors. Here, we report on the isolation of a new homeobox gene of the paired superclass, Otlx2, whose early expression pattern in the mesencephalon and prosencephalon is congruent with proposed neuromeric models of brain morphogenesis. In addition, its late embryonic and postnatal expression, in clear continuity with the earlier pattern, suggests a role in the neuronal differentiation and the histogenesis of several prosencephalic and mesencephalic areas. Finally, Otlx2 is expressed from the earliest morphogenetic events in the Rathke's pouch, the anlage of the adenohypophysis, an expression site shared by a very close homologue, Otlx1/Ptx1/P-Otx.
    Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience 02/1996; 8(4):258-71. DOI:10.1006/mcne.1996.0062 · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the process of cloning murine proteins capable of binding to a regulatory module of the Ncam promoter, we isolated a novel homeobox gene, Barx1, the first vertebrate member of the structural subclass defined by Drosophila BarH1. Here we report its sequence, chromosomal localisation and embryonic expression pattern. Barx1 was strongly expressed in restricted areas of head and neck mesenchyme and in the wall of the developing stomach and at weaker levels in the proximal fore- and hindlimbs. At embryonic day 10.5, expression in the head region is detected in spatially restricted areas of the first and second branchial arches, before any apparent cellular or morphological differentiation. Later in development, all expressing tissues in this region, which include the mesenchyme underlying the olfactory epithelium, the primary and secondary palate, the molar tooth papillae and the stroma of the submandibular gland, appear derived from ectomesenchyme of neural crest origin. At day 16.5, all locations other than the developing molars had become Barx1-negative. An intriguing feature is the restriction of Barx1 expression to the molars suggesting a role in the differentiation of molars from incisors. Barx1 already marks the future stomach region of the primitive gut at embryonic day 9.5 and is present in the mesenchymal wall of the stomach up to day 16.5. These results thus direct a search for its function to a number of inductive epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during craniofacial development and to stomach organogenesis.
    Mechanisms of Development 06/1995; 51(1):3-15. DOI:10.1016/0925-4773(94)00343-L · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have examined the regulation of transcription factor gene expression and phenotypic markers in developing chick sympathetic neurons. Sympathetic progenitor cells first express the bHLH transcriptional regulator Cash-1 (a chicken achaete-scute homologue), followed by coordinate expression of Phox2, a paired homeodomain protein, and GATA-2, a zinc finger protein. SCG10, a pan-neuronal membrane protein, is first detected one stage later, followed by the catecholaminergic neurotransmitter enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). We have used these markers to ask two questions: (1) is their expression dependent upon inductive signals derived from the notochord or floor plate?; (2) does their sequential expression reflect a single linear pathway or multiple parallel pathways? Notochord ablation experiments indicate that the floor plate is essential for induction of GATA-2, Phox2 and TH, but not for that of Cash-1 and SCG10. Taken together these data suggest that the development of sympathetic neurons involves multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades: one, dependent upon notochord or floor plate-derived signals and involving Phox2 and GATA-2, is assigned to the expression of the neurotransmitter phenotype; the other, independent of such signals and involving Cash-1, is assigned to the expression of pan-neuronal properties. The parallel specification of different components of the terminal neuronal phenotype is likely to be a general feature of neuronal development.
    Development 04/1995; 121(3):887-901. · 6.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Transcriptional regulation of the gene encoding the cell adhesion receptor NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule), a putative effector molecule of a variety of morphogenetic events, is likely to involve important regulators of morphogenesis. Here we identify two mouse homeodomain proteins that bind to an upstream regulatory element in the Ncam promoter: Cux, related to Drosophila cut and human CDP, and Phox2, a novel protein with a homeodomain related to that of the Drosophila paired gene. In transient transfection experiments, Cux was found to be a strong inhibitor of Ncam promoter activity, and this inhibition could be relieved by simultaneously overexpressing Phox2. These results suggest that the Ncam gene might be a direct target of homeodomain proteins and provide a striking example of regulatory cross-talk between homeodomain proteins of different classes. Whereas the expression pattern of Cux/CDP includes many NCAM-negative sites, Phox2 expression was restricted to cells also expressing Ncam or their progenitors. The localisation data thus strongly reinforce the notion that Phox2 plays a role in transcriptional activation of Ncam in Phox2-positive cell types. In the peripheral nervous system, Phox2 was strongly expressed in all ganglia of the autonomic nervous system and more weakly in some cranial sensory ganglia, but not in the sensory ganglia of the trunk. Phox2 transcripts were detected in the primordia of sympathetic ganglia as soon as they form. Phox2 expression in the brain was confined to spatially restricted domains in the hindbrain, which correspond to the noradrenergic and adrenergic nuclei once they are identifiable. All Phox2-expressing components of the peripheral nervous system are at least transiently adrenergic or noradrenergic. In the developing brain, Phox2 was expressed at all known locations of (nor)adrenergic neurones and of their precursors. These results suggest that Phox2, in addition to regulating the NCAM gene, may be part of the regulatory cascade that controls the differentiation of neurons towards this neurotransmitter phenotype.
    Development 12/1993; 119(3):881-96. · 6.27 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
279.03 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris
      • Département de Biologie
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1997–2000
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1986–1999
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1993–1995
    • Aix-Marseille Université
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 1987–1993
    • Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France