I Eli

Tel Aviv University, Tell Afif, Tel Aviv, Israel

Are you I Eli?

Claim your profile

Publications (86)139.24 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives To compare the sexual function of women with and without vaginal penetration difficulties (VPDs) and relate it to the sexual function of their male partners. Methods All consenting women attending a sexual medicine centre during 2005–2007 completed the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and answered questions about five VPDs (placement of a tampon, gynaecological examination, insertion of her or her partner's finger, and penile-vaginal intercourse). Male partners filled the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Results Full data were available for 223 women, and 118 male partners. Male partners of women with VPDs (n = 53) had lower sexual desire (p = 0.0225). The number of VPDs in the women concerned negatively correlated with their partners’ desire (r = − 0.18339, p = 0.0468) and erectile function (r = − 0.19848, p = 0.0312). All women with at least one VPD (n = 109) reported significantly more sexual pain (p < 0.0001) and had worse sexual function scores (p = 0.014) than women with no VPDs (n = 114). Women with VPDs other than penile-vaginal penetration had worse orgasmic functioning (p = 0.0119). Conclusions The women's VPDs are correlated with worse sexual functioning for them and for their male partners. The five VPDs are a practical and useful tool for identifying impaired sexual functioning.
    The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 07/2014; · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Both oro-related behavioural and sexual dysfunctions are non-life-threatening conditions which can have an impact on individual well-being. Possible common features include intra-body penetration, giving control to another person, and experiencing encounters that can sometimes be subjectively experienced as aggressive and/or abusive. The present study examined possible sexual correlates of dental anxiety and gagging. A total of 448 individuals, who applied for sex therapy at the Sexual Medicine Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel, completed the following sexual and dental functioning questionnaires: International Index of Erectile Function (men only), Female Sexual Function Index and difficulties with sexual penetration (women only), dental anxiety, gagging reflex and dentist preference (entire population). Higher gagging reflex was associated with problems in sexual penetration and history of sexual abuse in women (especially one that included vaginal penetration). It was also associated with dental anxiety and higher preference for dentist of the same gender for both genders. The study shows that gagging reflex can bear sexual connotations, especially in women.
    Community dental health 09/2012; 29(3):243-7. · 0.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The reported prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) present during childhood and adolescence ranges between 7% and 68%. The range of the reported prevalence of sleep bruxism in children is also wide. The purpose of the current study was threefold: (i) determine the prevalence of oral parafunctions, sleep bruxism and of anamnestic and clinical findings of TMD among Israeli children with primary or mixed dentition; (ii) to establish whether the parafunctional activities are associated with anamnestic and clinical findings of TMD in this population and (iii) to examine the possible impact of stressful life events on the prevalence of bruxism, oral parafunctions, and anamnestic and clinical findings of TMD in children. A total of 244 children (183 girls and 61 boys) aged 5-12 years were included in the study. Each participant underwent a full TMD examination. Parents, in collaboration with their children, completed a questionnaire on TMD symptoms, oral parafunctions and stressful life events in their children's life. Most participants (78·8%) reported at least one oral habit. Of these, only 'jaw play' was associated with TMD anamnestic and clinical findings. Stressful life events were associated only with the performance of multiple oral habits. These findings indicate that the performance of oral parafunctions is commonplace during childhood, with younger children exhibiting fewer oral parafunctions than adolescents. Stressful life events are related with an increase in the performance of multiple oral parafunctions in children but the later are not necessarily associated with anamnestic and clinical findings of TMD in the paediatric population.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 09/2011; 39(2):126-35. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Ruth Defrin, Ilana Eli, Dorit Pud
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sex, gender, ethnicity, and religion are powerful factors that may affect pain experience. Recently, gender role expectations of pain (GREP) were suggested to account for some of the differences in pain perception between men and women. However, the interaction between GREP and ethnicity and religion was not examined. This interaction was studied with regard to pain sensitivity, pain endurance, and willingness to report pain. Our objective was to study the interaction among GREP, sex, and ethno-religious belonging. Participants (548 healthy men and women) of 3 different ethno-religious groups (341 Jews, 105 Muslim-Arabs, 102 Christian-Arabs) completed the GREP questionnaire; pain sensitivity, pain endurance, and willingness to report pain were analyzed. Men of all 3 ethno-religious groups perceived themselves and other men as less sensitive and less willing to report pain than typical women. Women of all 3 ethno-religious groups perceived themselves and other women as more sensitive and more willing to report pain than men. Ethno-religious differences were observed in the attitudes towards typical men and women, with Christian men and women exhibiting stronger stereotypical views regarding pain sensitivity and pain endurance. Individual's perceptions of pain regarding one's self compared with the same or opposite sex were similar regardless of ethno-religious belonging and were related to sex. However, attitudes on pain of typical men and women seemed to be influenced by ethno-religious belonging. This differential effect of ethno-religion on GREP with relation to sex suggests that these factors should be considered when pain perception is evaluated.
    Gender Medicine 06/2011; 8(3):172-83. · 1.69 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To examine possible associations between self-reported bruxism, stress, desirability of control, dental anxiety and gagging. Five questionnaires were distributed among a general adult population (402 respondents): the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Desirability of Control Scale (DC), Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), Gagging Assessment Scale (GAS), and Bruxism Assessment Questionnaire. A high positive correlation between DAS and GAS (R = 0·604, P < 0·001) was found. PSS was negatively correlated with DC (R = -0·292, P < 0·001), and was positively correlated with GAS (R = 0·217, P < 0·001) and DAS (R = 0·214, P < 0·001). Respondents who reported bruxing while awake or asleep showed higher levels of GAS, DAS and PSS than those who did not. There were no differences between the bruxers and the non-bruxers (sleep and aware) with regard to the DC scores. The best predictors of awake bruxism were sleep bruxism (OR = 4·98, CI 95% 2·54-9·74) and GAS (OR = 1·10, CI 95% 1·04-1·17). The best predictors of sleep bruxism were awake bruxism (OR = 5·0, CI 95% 2·56-9·78) and GAS (OR = 1·19; CI 95% 1·11-1·27). Self-reported sleep bruxism significantly increases the odds for awake bruxism and vice versa. Tendency for gagging during dental care slightly increases the odds of both types of self-reported bruxism, but desirability of control is not associated with these phenomena.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 01/2011; 38(1):3-11. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the prevalence of developmental disturbances in permanent teeth in which buds were exposed to intraligamental injection (ILI) delivered by a computer controlled local anaesthetic delivery (C-CLAD). The study population consisted of 78 children (age 4.1-12.8 years) who received ILI-C-CLAD to 166 primary molars. A structured form was designed to include information regarding age at treatment, gender, type of treated tooth, tooth location, type of dental treatment, and type of developmental disturbance(s) present in the associated permanent tooth. Teeth, which received regular anaesthesia or were not anaesthetized by local anaesthesia, served as controls. Five children had developmental defects. In C-CLAD-ILI exposed teeth, one child had two hypomaturation defects. The corresponding primary teeth were extracted. No defects were found on the control side. In two children, hypoplastic defects were found only in the control teeth (one in each child). One suffered from a dentoalveolar abscess in the corresponding primary tooth. Diffuse hypomaturation defects were found in two children on both the C-CLAD-ILI exposed and control sides. In the primary dentition, C-CLAD-ILI does not increase the danger of developmental disturbances to the underlying permanent dental bud.
    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry 07/2010; 20(4):270-5. · 0.92 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gender role expectations of pain (GREP) was suggested to predict sex differences in pain perception. Our aim was to explore sex differences in GREP and investigate its relationship with heat-pain threshold (HPT) and heat-pain tolerance limit (HPTL). University students (115 males, 134 females) filled the GREP questionnaire. HPT and HPTL were measured in a sample of 72 students. Additionally, GREP values of the present sample were compared with those of the original, American sample to explore possible cultural effects. Both males and females perceive themselves (and their own sex in general) to be less sensitive to pain and less willing to report of pain than the opposite sex. Males perceived themselves and other men, to endure pain relatively similar to women whereas females perceived themselves and other women as less endurable to pain than men. HPT was similar for the two sexes but males had higher HPTL than females. Within each sex, HPTL correlated mainly with self's perception of pain sensitivity. The American and Israeli samples differed in that Israeli males and females presented stronger stereotypical views towards same and opposite sexes. Both males and females held stereotypical "macho" attitude towards themselves with regard to pain sensitivity and willingness to report of pain however only females held stereotypical, "macho" attitude towards themselves with regard to pain endurance. The sex differences in GREP and in HPTL and the correlations between GREP items and experimental thresholds suggest that the relationship between GREP and experimental pain is complex and sex-specific. It also appears that GREP is affected by culture.
    Pain 08/2009; 145(1-2):230-6. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate temporomandibular disorders (TMD) Axis I and II among Israeli-Jewish patients using the Hebrew version of the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMD and to compare the results with Swedish, United States, Asian and Israeli-Arab populations. The study consisted of 298 Israeli-born, Jewish patients (male/female ratio 3.5:1), arriving at an Orofacial Pain Clinic during the year 2001-2004. A complete clinical examination was carried out according to the RDC/TMD protocol. Axis I diagnoses: 65% of the Israeli-Jewish patients exhibited myofacial pain (Group I disorder), 38% disc displacement (Group II disorder) and 18% arthralgia, osteoarthritis or osteoarthrosis (Group III disorder). Axis II diagnoses: 20% of the patients scored severe depression and 35% scored somatization. Pain was reported in 82% of the patients (mean pain duration 35.7-33.8 months for women, 44.1 for men). Patients had an average disability score of 30.0 +/- 30.2. Chronic pain grade IV was present in 4% of the patients. Israeli-Jewish temporomandibular disorder patients showed results similar to those reported for other countries, further supporting the use of the RDC/TMD internationally as a reliable epidemiological tool. Globally, Axis I scores were similar, while Axis II scores were more susceptible to geographic/ethnic differences. Gender can influence Axis I and Axis II as well as possible gender specific association with socio-economic status. In future comparisons, men and women should be considered separately.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 11/2008; 36(1):11-7. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Stress significantly affects a person's cognitive ability to process information. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients' ability to recognize information related to the procedure they are about to undergo will be affected by the stressfulness of the situation (less recognition under a high-stress situation as compared with a low-stress situation). Patients (n = 66) were evaluated for their ability to recognize clinical information supplied on two different occasions: immediately before oral surgery (high-stress condition) and before suture removal (low-stress condition). Dental and state of anxiety and expectation of pain were also assessed. On both occasions, the patients' ability to recognize information correctly was low (less than 50%). Patients recognized significantly less information pre-operatively than before suture removal. State of anxiety, dental anxiety, and expectation to experience pain had a profound effect on their ability to recognize provided information correctly. Apparently, before dental treatment (high or low on stress), patients' ability to process information may be severely impaired.
    Journal of Dental Research 02/2008; 87(1):65-8. · 3.83 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dental anxiety is a serious obstacle in conventional oral healthcare delivery. A sensory adapted dental environment (SDE) might be effective in reducing anxiety and inducing relaxation. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a Snoezelen SDE in reducing anxiety among children undergoing scaling and polishing by a dental hygienist. The Snoezelen environment consists of a partially dimmed room with lighting effects, vibroacoustic stimuli, and deep pressure. Nineteen children, aged 6-11 yr, participated in a cross-over intervention trial. Behavioral parameters included the mean number, duration, and magnitude of anxious behaviors, as monitored by videotaped recordings. Physiological parameters reflecting arousal were monitored by changes in dermal resistance. Results, by all measures, consistently indicated that both behavioral and psychophysiological measures of relaxation improved significantly in the SDE compared with a conventional dental environment. The findings support recommending the SDE as an effective and practical alternative in oral healthcare delivery to anxious children.
    European Journal Of Oral Sciences 01/2008; 115(6):479-83. · 1.42 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare the prevalence of psychologic, dental, and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) signs and symptoms between young women suffering from chronic eating disorders (ED) and a control group of age-matched, healthy women, and to evaluate the impact of frequent vomiting on these signs and symptoms among the ED group. Clinical examination and self-administered questionnaires were used to evaluate psychologic, dental, and TMD signs and symptoms among 79 women hospitalized because of chronic ED and 48 age-matched healthy women (as controls). ED patients were further analyzed according to their habit of daily vomiting (43 vomiting versus 36 nonvomiting patients). Pearson chi-square and analysis of variance were used to analyze categorical differences between study groups. Women with ED showed a significantly higher sensitivity to muscle palpation (P < .001) and higher levels of depression, somatization, and anxiety (P < .001), as well as a higher prevalence of intensive gum chewing (P < .001), dental erosions (P < .001), and attrition (P < .001), than the healthy controls. Vomiting patients showed higher muscle sensitivity to palpation than nonvomiting patients (P < .001) and greater emotional and psychologic distress (P < .001). Women with chronic ED suffer from higher muscular sensitivity to palpation, greater emotional distress, and more hard tissue destruction (dental erosions, dental sensitivity) than healthy women.
    Journal of orofacial pain 01/2008; 22(3):201-8. · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dental implantation is a stressful experience, both physically and psychologically. The effect of anxiety on the patient's ability to process relevant information prior to a stressful clinical situation (implant insertion) was evaluated. The study included 98 healthy patients, scheduled for implant insertion. Two different audio-tapes with relevant information regarding implant insertion were listened to immediately pre-operatively. Recognition questionnaires, consisting of 21 statements (correct and false information) were prepared, one for each tape. The dental anxiety scale (DAS), degree of state anxiety (SA), evaluation of pain expected during surgery, and extent to which patients understood the information provided were examined on 100 mm visual analogue scales. A significant positive correlation was found between patients' DAS and SA and between patients' expectation to experience pain during the surgical procedure. Certainty of understanding (CU) significantly contributed to the explanation of correctly classified statements (beta=-0.43, t=3.71, P<0.01). CU was positively related to SA and negatively to DAS. In a stressful pre-surgical situation, the ability to process relevant information may be severely impaired and should not be given to patients immediately before planned treatment.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 03/2007; 18(1):9-12. · 3.43 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To characterise post-operative pain (PDP) and use of analgesic agents in children. The study consisted of 472 children, who received routine dental treatment. Teeth were anaesthetised by a computerised delivery system, either intrasulculary (CDS-IS) or by local infiltration (CDS-IF). Information regarding post-operative pain and use of analgesic agents was obtained by a telephone call within 24 hours after treatment. The overall incidence of PDP was 38%. 60.9% of the children who experienced PDP were given an analgesic agent. Incidence and severity of pain were significantly associated with type of dental procedure. The highest incidence was found after root canal treatment (62.5%) and preformed crowns (60.8%). A higher incidence of PDP was found in teeth with history of pain or abscess as compared to teeth with restoration or caries (p <0.01). Incidence of pain was not associated with restoration material, extension, depth or type (occlusal vs proximal) of restoration, multiple restoration, gender, mode of CDS anaesthesia, or effectiveness of anaesthesia during dental treatment. Analgesic drugs were given mainly after preformed crowns, root canal filling and extractions. PDP and analgesic use in children is common, especially after root canal filling, preformed crowns and extractions. CDS-IS is not associated with increased PDP.
    British dental journal official journal of the British Dental Association: BDJ online 03/2007; 202(5):E13; discussion 276-7. · 1.09 Impact Factor
  • Brit Dent J. 01/2007; 202:1-4.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of bruxism and signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) among psychiatric patients compared with a healthy population and to assess the effect of psychiatric medications on the parameters studied. Subjects included 77 psychiatric patients under treatment at 2 psychiatric hospitals in Israel and 50 healthy individuals (control). One experienced calibrated examiner performed the clinical examination (presence of bruxism and signs of TMD). Abnormal attrition was evident in 46.8% of the psychiatric patients compared with 20% in the controls (P < .005). Significant differences between groups were apparent for mean muscle sensitivity to palpation, joint sensitivity to palpation, and range of mouth opening. There were no differences between groups in the prevalence of joint clicks and no association between time of receiving treatment with dopamine antagonists (or any other psychotropic drugs) and TMD signs and symptoms. The higher prevalence of bruxism and signs of TMD in psychiatric patients is a major clinical comorbidity. Whether it is a manifestation of the abnormal central nervous system of psychiatric patients or neuroleptic-induced phenomenon deserves further attention. The exact factors that affect the pain experience in these patients should be evaluated as well.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 01/2007; 103(1):60-3. · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patients referred from an otorhinolaryngologist with a chief complaint of earache or other ear symptoms are common in a temporomandibular disorders (TMD) clinic. These patients often complain of other symptoms, such as headache, facial pain, and limited mouth opening, all of which can be present in a patient suffering from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The aim of this case report was to describe the signs and symptoms of NPC and discuss possible causes for the misdiagnosis of NPC as TMD. The characteristics of 8 NPC patients reported in the literature whose cancer was initially misdiagnosed as TMD and those of an NPC patient with TMD-like symptoms treated at the clinic of 1 of the authors are described, and the reasons for misdiagnosis are discussed. A revision of Trotter's syndrome for the differential diagnosis of TMD is proposed. There is a need for detailed exclusion criteria to be applied prior to the assignment of a clinical diagnosis based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD.
    Journal of orofacial pain 02/2006; 20(1):74-81. · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of infiltration and intrasulcular injection, delivered by a computerized delivery system (CDS), to primary maxillary molars. The study population consisted of 178 children (2-14 years old) who received local infiltration (buccal and palatal) or intrasulcular injection to primary maxillary molars with the use of a CDS. Behavior was managed using: (1) behavioral management techniques; (2) N2O inhalation; or (3) sedation. Measured dependent variables included the: (1) child's subjective perception of well-being before and immediately after anesthesia (scale = 0-100); (2) child's pain behavior during anesthesia, as measured by Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario pain scale (CHEOPS; range = 4-13); and (3) effectiveness of anesthesia during dental treatment. Low stress levels were shown for most children before and immediately after anesthesia (range = 12-23). The CHEOPS rating for pain-distractive behavior associated with palatal and buccal infiltration and intrasulcular anesthesia by CDS was similar (6.0 +/- 1.9, 5.8 +/- 1.7, and 5.9 +/- 1.6, respectively). Children treated under sedation, compared to behavioral management techniques, showed higher CHEOPS scores (P = .004). The effectiveness of anesthesia using a CDS (infiltration and intrasulcular) had a downward trend, but was not significantly different for restoration (91%), pulpotomy and preformed crowns (79%), or extraction (74%; mean = 86%). There was no significant difference between infiltration and intrasulcular effectiveness or for age, gender, or tooth location (primary maxillary first vs second molars). CDS caused low levels of stress and pain reaction after palatal infiltration equal to that for buccal infiltration. All procedures achieved anesthesia effectiveness (86%), with no differences between primary maxillary first and second molars.
    Pediatric dentistry 01/2006; 28(1):29-38. · 0.56 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To use the Axis I and Axis II test items of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) to study the differences in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) between Israeli Arabs and Israeli Jews. Sixty-five Israeli Jews and 50 Israeli Arabs who were referred with a proposed diagnosis of TMD participated in the study. The overall male:female ratio was 1:7.3 in the Israeli Arab group compared with 1:2.4 in the Israeli Jewish group, with a significant difference in gender between groups (P < .05). A comparison of women only in both groups (44 Israeli Arab women and 46 Israeli Jewish women) revealed no statistically significant differences in Axis I diagnoses, disability days, pain duration, and Characteristic Pain Intensity scores. The Israeli Arab women scored higher in Axis II parameters: Differences between the 2 groups were statistically significant with respect to depression scores (P < .001), anxiety scores (P < .001), somatization scores (pain items excluded) (P < .001), somatization scores (pain items included) (P < .05), average disability scores (P < .01), and chronic pain grade (P < .05). The results highlight the social component of the biopsychosocial model in sculpturing chronic pain behavior. Our research suggests the possible need for cross-cultural calibration of the Axis II assessment tools of the RDC/TMD.
    Journal of orofacial pain 01/2006; 20(1):36-42. · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Pediatric dentistry 01/2006; 28:29-38. · 0.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pain measures associated with computerized delivery of intrasulcular anesthestic have not been reported. The authors evaluated a computerized delivery system for intrasulcular (CDS-IS) anesthesia in primary molars. METHODS; The study population consisted of children aged 2 to 13 years who received CDS-IS injections, 159 in mandibular molars and 48 in maxillary molars. Children were treated by one of three modes of behavioral management: behavior modification (BM) only, inhalation of nitrous oxide (N2O) in addition to BM or intrarectal sedation. Variables evaluated included the subjective perception of the child's well-being before and after administration of the anesthetic, the child's pain behavior during anesthetic administration, effectiveness of the anesthetic during dental treatment, incidence of reported postoperative dental pain (PDP) and analgesic use after the CDS-IS injections. The effectiveness of CDS-IS anesthesia in mandibular molars was 97 percent, 92 percent, 63 percent and 71 percent for restorations, preformed stainless steel crowns, extractions and pulpal therapies, respectively (mean effectiveness, 89 percent). The effectiveness of CDS-IS anesthesia in maxillary molars was 96 percent, 50 percent, 92 percent and 78 percent, respectively (mean effectiveness, 90 percent). CDS-IS was less effective in children aged 2 to 4 years who received sedation than it was in older children. The authors found no differences between children's subjective self-reports of well-being before and after anesthetic administration, between the sexes and/or between modes of behavioral management (that is, BM or N2O). Most children exhibited low pain-related behavior during anesthetic administration, with no differences between boys and girls. The overall incidence of PDP was 31.4 percent; 64.9 percent of these patients received pain-relieving medications as a result, with no correlation to age, tooth treated, effectiveness of anesthesia or type of treatment. CDS-IS is effective for anesthetizing primary molars, mainly for amalgam, resin-based composite and stainless steel crown restorations.
    Journal of the American Dental Association (1939) 11/2005; 136(10):1418-25. · 1.82 Impact Factor