H. Takanobu

Waseda University, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (76)7.31 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Personal robots and robot technology (RT)- based assistive devices are expected to play a major role in Japan's elderly-dominated society, both for joint activities with their human partners and for participation in community life. These new devices should be capable of smooth and natural adaptation and interaction with their human partners and the environment, should be able to communicate naturally with humans, and should never have a negative effect on their human partners, neither physical nor emotional. To achieve this smooth and natural integration between humans and robots, we need first to investigate and clarify how these interactions are carried out. Therefore, we developed the portable bioinstrumentation system WB-2 (Waseda bioinstrumentation system No.2), which can measure the movements of the head, the arms, and the hands (position, velocity, and acceleration), as well as several physiological parameters (electrical activity of the heart respiration, perspiration, pulse wave, and so on), to objectively measure and understand the physical and physiological effects of the interaction between robots and humans. In this paper we present our development of the Inertial Measurement Unit, which is at the heart of our new motion-capture system that replaces the system used in the Waseda bioinstrumentation system No.1 refined (WB-1R). Some preliminary results of experiments with the unit are also presented and analyzed.
    Robotics and Biomimetics, 2007. ROBIO 2007. IEEE International Conference on; 01/2008
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    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses biomimetic water strider robots that have microfabricated hydrophobic legs. Various kinds of supporting legs with hydrophobic microstructures on their surfaces were developed using MEMS (micro electromechanical systems) techniques. The lift and pull-off forces of these supporting legs were analyzed theoretically and then measured. The experimental results were in good agreement with the calculations. Two different mechanisms for autonomous water strider robots were developed. One robot with twelve microfabricated legs driven by a vibration motor successfully moved on a water surface and also made left/right turns by exploiting differences in the resonant frequencies of the legs. The other robot, with six microstructured legs, moved on water through elliptical motion of its middle legs, which is similar to the motion of actual water striders.
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2007. IROS 2007. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 12/2007
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    ABSTRACT: Personal Robots and Robot Technology (RT)-based assistive devices are expected to play a major role in Japan's elderly-dominated society, both for joint activities with their human partners and for participation in community life. These new devices should be capable of smooth and natural adaptation and interaction with their human partners and the environment, should be able to communicate naturally with humans, and should never have a negative effect on their human partners, neither physical nor emotional. To achieve this smooth and natural integration between humans and robots, we need first to investigate and clarify how these interactions are carried out. Therefore, we developed the portable Bioinstrumentation System WB-1R (Waseda Bioinstrumentation system no.l Refined), which can measure the movements of the head, the arms, the hands (position, velocity, and acceleration), as well as several physiological parameters (electrocardiogram, respiration, perspiration, pulse wave, and so on), to objectively measure and understand the physical and physiological effects of the interaction between robots and humans. In this paper we present our development of the head and hands motion capture systems as additional modules for the Waseda Bioinstrumentation system No.1 (WB-1). The preliminary experimental results, given the inexpensiveness of the systems, are good for our purposes.
    Advanced intelligent mechatronics, 2007 IEEE/ASME international conference on; 10/2007
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the development and experimental results of a master manipulator for the Workspace-creation manipulator for minimally invasive surgery. The master manipulator was developed for the purpose of maximizing the doctor's facility for performing operations. Therefore, the master manipulator needs to be easy to use for the doctor. This master manipulator which was developed has three degrees of freedom to control the Workspace-creation manipulator that has eleven degrees of freedom. And the authors studied new operation system with image of MRI.
    Mechatronics, ICM2007 4th IEEE International Conference on; 06/2007
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this research is the development of a patient robot for use in actual clinical training. Electro pneumatic regulators and electromagnetic valves incorporated in the robot is operated by manipulating air cylinders. It is possible to conduct training assuming several patients enabling trainees to learn a flexible response under a wide range of circumstances. A simple interface was used for ease of operation. Further, a built-in sensor inside the oral cavity responds to the trainee's actions leading to a vomiting reflex and pain during drilling teeth. Attaching the pain sensor to the body of test subjects, will also be useful for training social service workers during nursing care examinations.
    Mechatronics, ICM2007 4th IEEE International Conference on; 06/2007
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    ABSTRACT: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has become very common in recent years, thanks to the many advantages it provides for patients. Since it is difficult for surgeons to learn and master this technique, several training methods and metrics have been proposed, both to improve the surgeon's abilities and also to assess his/her skills. This paper presents the use of the WB-1R (Waseda bioinstrumentation system no.1 refined), which was developed at Waseda University, Tokyo, to investigate and analyze a surgeon's movements and performance. Specifically, the system can measure the movements of the head, the arms, and the hands, as well as several physiological parameters. In this paper we present our experiment to evaluate a surgeon's ability to handle surgical instruments and his/her depth perception using a laparoscopic view. Our preliminary analysis of a subset of the acquired data (i.e. comfort of the subjects; the amount of time it took o complete each exercise; and respiration) clearly shows that the expert surgeon and the group of medical students perform very differently. Therefore, WB-1R (or, better, a newer version tailored specifically for use in the operating room) could provide important additional information to help assess the experience and performance of surgeons, thus leading to the development of a global performance index for surgeons during MIS. These analyses and modeling, moreover, are an important step towards the automatization and the robotic assistance of the surgical gesture.
    2007 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, October 29 - November 2, 2007, Sheraton Hotel and Marina, San Diego, California, USA; 01/2007
  • I. J. Humanoid Robotics. 01/2007; 4:181-206.
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    Conference Proceeding: Dental Patient Robot
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    ABSTRACT: Presently, the simple head model (hereinafter referred to as phantom for practical training) with dentition models is used for dental therapy training. We suggested the patient robot for dental therapy training (hereinafter referred to as patient robot) as one of the practical applications of the humanoid robot technology, and we actually developed patient robots. One of them is the general model provided with 14 degrees of freedom (DOF) in addition to a tongue and lips that may interfere with treatment, allowing reflection of any change in simple expression. Also, active motions of the neck or hand allow various impediments so as to interfere with the actual potential treatment. The robot allowed trainees to do dental therapy training closer to the actual practice involving avoidance of these risks
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 11/2006
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    ABSTRACT: Personal robots, which are expected to become popular in the future, are required to be active in joint work and community life with humans. Such robots must have no bad physical or psychical effect on humans. The psychical effect of a robot on humans has been subjectively measured using questionnaires. However, it has not been objectively measured yet. Human emotion and the consciousness direction can be measured by physiological parameters and body motion, respectively. Therefore, the bioinstrumentation system WB-1 was developed in order to objectively measure the psychical effect of a robot on a human. It can measure physiological parameters such as respiration, heart rate, perspiration and pulse wave, and arm motion. Analyzing human stress in the interaction with a robot from electrocardiogram, the robot could generate a motion for decreasing the stress
    2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006, October 9-15, 2006, Beijing, China; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: Personal robots, which are expected to become popular in the future, are required to be active in joint work and community life with human. Therefore, the objective of this study is the development of new mechanisms and functions for a humanoid robot to express emotions and to communicate naturally with human. We developed both the mental model from psychological point of view and the Emotion Expression Humanoid Robot WE-4RII (Waseda Eye No.4 Refined II) from engineered point of view. In this paper, a co-associative memory model using mutually coupled chaotic neural networks was proposed and implemented in WE-4RII as its mental model. We confirmed that the robot could generate the behavior depending on its mood in response to a stimulus.
    Intelligent Autonomous Systems 9 - IAS-9, Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Intelligent Autonomous Systems, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, March 7-9, 2006; 01/2006
  • T. Kawamura, T. Tandai, H. Takanobu
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the development of a multi-degrees of freedom (DOF) flexible robot based on the tongue. The authors focused on the tongue because of its "flexibility" and "soft motion." The robot performs motions characteristic of the tongue: i.e., up-down and right-left motion of tip, and up-down, right-left, twisting, and circular motion of the whole. The robot's forms were defined as a 1D form (a shape like a string), a 2D form (a shape like a sheet of paper), and a 3D form (a solid structure). In Stage 1, the robot consists of three parts: the tip, the body, and the base. This robot enabled realization of basic motion and 1-2D form. To transform 3D form, the whole robot will be built up from the basic units. Basic unit is tip part mechanisms in Stage 1. The basic formula for controlling the basic unit is indispensable in designing a robot from basic units. Thus, the basic formula was sought. Moreover, the basic unit was evaluated using the basic formula.
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2005. (IROS 2005). 2005 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 09/2005
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    ABSTRACT: We have developed a new talking robot, WT-5 (Waseda Talker No. 5), having novel vocal cords and lips based on human biological structures. The vocal cords are made from the thermoplastic rubber "Septon", available from Kuraray Co. Ltd, which has a similar elasticity to human tissue. The vocal cord model was constructed with a similar structure to the biological structure of the human vocal cords. The vocal cords vibrated like those of a human. The new lips were able to attain a large deformation in a similar manner to human lips, without the leakage of air. This allowed clear pronunciation of vowels. With these new mechanisms, the robot could reproduce human speech in a more biological manner and could produce voices closer to those of a human.
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2005. (IROS 2005). 2005 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 09/2005
  • H. Takanobu, T. Kawamura, S. Saito
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    ABSTRACT: We have developed a multi-DOF flexible robot modeled on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the basis of heredity. DNA consists of bases, phosphate, and sugars that form a double helix, which can form a superhelix. In the present study, this double helix was modeled as a serial mechanism of 3-DOF basic units. The results of simulations with this model showed that it can form a superhelix. In addition, we built a robot consisting of 10 units with shape memory alloy to demonstrate that a superhelix can be developed.
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2005. (IROS 2005). 2005 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 09/2005
  • Conference Proceeding: Silkworm Handling Robot System
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the development and experimental results obtained using a silkworm handling robot. This study was performed to establish a system for the handling of silkworms, and to make use of automated breeding to produce usable materials. Silkworms are soft and amorphous. Therefore, gripping them is extremely difficult, and requires a specialized handling system. The authors devised a gripping strategy, taking into consideration damage of the very supple silkworms, which was used successfully for the handling of silkworms.
    Robotics and Automation, 2005. ICRA 2005. Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE International Conference on; 05/2005
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    ABSTRACT: Personal robots, which are expected to become popular in the near future, are required to be active in work and community life alongside humans. Therefore, we have been developing new mechanisms and functions in order to realize natural bilateral interaction by expressing emotions, behaviors and personality in a human-like manner. We have proposed a mental model with emotion, mood, personality and needs. However, the robot behavior was very simple since the robot shows just a single kind of behavior in response to a robot mental state. In this paper, we present a new behavior model for humanoid robots based on operant conditioning, which is a well-known psychological behavior model. We implemented this new behavior model into the emotion expression humanoid robot WE-4RII (Waseda Eye No.4 Refined II), developed in 2004. Through the experimental evaluations, we confirmed that the robot with the new behavior model could autonomously select suitable behavior for the situation within a predefined behavior list
    Humanoid Robots, 2005 5th IEEE-RAS International Conference on; 02/2005
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes development of a new human-like talking robot WT-4 (Waseda Talker No. 4). WT-4 was developed to overcome the problems related to the lack of variation in the formant frequency of the sounds generated by the previous talking robot WT-3. These problems arose particularly on the first formant (F1) where frequencies of less than 500 [Hz] could not be reached. And the differences among WT-3’s vowels were not clear; which may have been caused by the sound source of the vocal cords and the lips. Therefore, the connection between the vocal cords and the vocal tract was improved, as well as the lips mechanism. As the result of these improvements, WT-4’s sounds were quite similar to a human’s, and WT-4 was able to reproduce suitable sounds using auditory feedback.
    Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, ICRA 2005, April 18-22, 2005, Barcelona, Spain; 01/2005
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    ABSTRACT: We developed a new talking robot, WT-5 (Waseda Talker No. 5), having novel vocal cords, based on human biological structures. The vocal cords were made from the thermoplastic rubber “Septon”, available from Kuraray Co. Ltd. Septon has a similar elasticity to human tissue. The vocal cord model to have a structure similar to the biological structure of the human vocal cords was made. The vocal cords were vibrated like those of a human. This made clean the robot’s vowels. With these new mechanisms, the robot could reproduce the human speech in a more biological view and could produce voices nearer to those of a human.
    Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems, 9th International Conference, KES 2005, Melbourne, Australia, September 14-16, 2005, Proceedings, Part III; 01/2005
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    ABSTRACT: Personal robots, which are expected to become popular in the future, are required to be active in joint work and community life with humans. Therefore, we have been developing new mechanisms and functions for a humanoid robot that has the ability to express emotions and to communicate with humans in a human-like manner. In 2004, we introduced the "Behavior Model" and "Consciousness Model" to the robot mental model so that the robot generated various kinds of behavior and an object of the robot's behavior became clear. We implemented the mental model in the emotion expression humanoid robot WE-4RII (Waseda Eye No.4 Refined II). Also, we have been studying a system of multiple harmonic oscillators (neurons) interacting via chaotic force since 2002. Each harmonic oscillator is driven by chaotic force whose bifurcation parameter is modulated by the position of the harmonic oscillator. In this paper, we propose an associative memory model using mutually coupled chaotic neural networks for generating an optimum behavior to a stimulus. We implemented this model in the emotional expression humanoid robot WE-4RII (Waseda Eye No.4 Refined II).
    Neural Networks, 2005. IJCNN '05. Proceedings. 2005 IEEE International Joint Conference on; 01/2005
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    ABSTRACT: We have been studying a system of many harmonic oscillators (neurons) interacting via a chaotic force since 2002. Each harmonic oscillator is driven by chaotic force whose bifurcation parameter is modulated by the position of the harmonic oscillator. Moreover, a system of mutually coupled chaotic neural networks was investigated. Different patterns were stored in each network and the associative memory problem was discussed in these networks. Each network can retrieve the pattern stored in the other network. On the other hand, we have been developing new mechanisms and functions for a humanoid robot with the ability to express emotions and communicate with humans in a human-like manner. We introduced a mental model which consisted of the mental space, the mood, the equations of emotion, the robot personality, the need model, the consciousness model and the behavior model. This type of mental model was implemented in Emotion Expression Humanoid Robot WE-4RII (Waseda Eye No.4 Refined II). In this paper, an associative memory model using mutually coupled chaotic neural networks is proposed for retrieving optimum memory (recognition) in response to a stimulus. We implemented this model in Emotion Expression Humanoid Robot WE-4RII (Waseda Eye No.4 Refined II).
    Neural Networks 01/2005; 18(5-6):666-73. · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors have been developing humanoid robots in order to develop new mechanisms and functions for a humanoid robot that has the ability to communicate naturally with a human by expressing human-like emotion. In 2004, we developed the emotion expression humanoid robot WE-4RII (Waseda Eye No.4 Refined II) by integrating the new humanoid robot hands RCH-I (RoboCasa Hand No.1) into the emotion expression humanoid robot WE-4R. We confirmed that WE-4RII can effectively express its emotion.
    Robotics and Automation, 2004. TExCRA '04. First IEEE Technical Exhibition Based Conference on; 12/2004

Publication Stats

482 Citations
118 Downloads
3k Views
7.31 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1993–2008
    • Waseda University
      • • Graduate School of Science and Engineering
      • • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2001–2007
    • Kogakuin University
      • Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2003
    • Università degli studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale
      Cassino, Latium, Italy