I Luzzi

Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Latium, Italy

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Publications (122)442.37 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDR-PA) isolates are susceptible to only one or two classes of antibiotics. In 2011-2012, we investigated an outbreak of XDR-PA affecting children with onco-hematological diseases.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 09/2014; 14(1):494. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar 4,[5],12,i:- is a monophasic variant of Salmonella Typhimurium and its occurrence has markedly increased in several European countries in the last ten years. In June 2011, an outbreak of Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:- was reported among attendees of a wedding reception in the North-East of Italy. The source of this outbreak was identified as a cooked pork product served during the wedding reception. All Salmonella isolates from humans and the contaminated pork products were identified as Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:- and phage typed as DT7a. Afterwards, the farm where the pigs were raised was identified and sampled, and Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from swine fecal samples. Despite the difference in serovar, these Salmonella Typhimurium isolates were also phage typed as DT7a. In the present study, Salmonella isolates from animals, humans and pork products during the outbreak investigation were subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeats Analysis (MLVA), and resistance patterns, aiming to identify the most suitable subtyping methods to characterize isolates associated with this outbreak. In addition, a collection of epidemiologically unrelated strains of Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:- and Salmonella Typhimurium sharing the same phage type (DT7a) was similarly characterized in order to investigate their genetic relationship. This study provides a first snapshot of a rare Salmonella phage type, DT7a, associated with both Salmonella 4,[5],12,i:- and Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, the study demonstrated that in this specific context MLVA could be a reliable tool to support outbreak investigations as well as to assess the genetic relatedness among Salmonella isolates.
    International journal of food microbiology. 07/2014; 189C:11-17.
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    ABSTRACT: Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of foodborne infections worldwide and includes more than 2500 different serovars, causing primarily gastroenteritis. However, the infection may occur elsewhere and produce characteristic clinical syndromes. Meningitis is a rare complication that occurs in less than 1% of clinical salmonellosis.
    Journal of medical case reports. 05/2014; 8(1):139.
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    ABSTRACT: Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli (S. Napoli) is an emerging serovar in Italy. It accounts for 2-4% of all serovars isolated from human infections. The zoonotic origin of this serovar is still unknown and this makes difficult to apply any control intervention. We report here the isolation of S. Napoli from a river nightingale (Cettia cetti, Temminck 1820) which represents the first description of this serovar from wild birds. This finding adds knowledge to the ecology of S. Napoli and addresses further studies aimed to assess the epidemiologic link between S. Napoli isolated from wild birds, food, environmental sources and human infections.
    Annali dell'Istituto superiore di sanita 01/2014; 50(1):96-8. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY The Dutch and modified Hald source attribution models were adapted to Italian Salmonella data to attribute human infections caused by the top 30 serotypes between 2002 and 2010 to four putative sources (Gallus gallus, turkeys, pigs, ruminants), at the points of animal reservoir (farm), exposure (food), and both combined. Attribution estimates were thus compared between different models, time periods and sampling points. All models identified pigs as the main source of human salmonellosis in Italy, accounting for 43-60% of infections, followed by G. gallus (18-34%). Attributions to turkeys and ruminants were minor. An increasing temporal trend in attributions to pigs and a decreasing one in those to G. gallus was also observed. Although the outcomes of the two models applied at farm and food levels essentially agree, they can be refined once more information becomes available, providing valuable insights about potential targets along the production chain.
    Epidemiology and Infection 08/2013; · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    Euro surveillance: bulletin europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin 07/2013; 18(27). · 5.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Drug-resistant derivatives of serovar-specific virulence plasmids, such as pSLT, in clinically-relevant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains, represent a threat for human health. We have analysed 14 S. Typhimurium isolates recovered in Italy and the United Kingdom from swine and from cases of human infection for the presence of virulence-resistance (VR) plasmids. They were negative for the multidrug resistance (MDR) region of the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1), but expressed resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin/spectinomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracyclines. The isolates were characterised by XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, and detection of resistance and virulence determinants (PCR/sequencing). Identification of VR plasmids was accomplished by PCR detection of bla genes (encoding ampicillin resistance), class 1 integrons and the pSLT virulence gene spvC. Plasmid analyses were performed by alkaline lysis, S1-nuclease digestion, replicon typing, conjugation, restriction analyses, and Southern blot/hybridization. Two blaOXA-1 positive isolates contained pSLT-derived plasmids related to pUO-StVR2. In nine isolates, eight from swine and one from a patient, MDR-conferring-IncFII-VR plasmids were detected. They contained the blaTEM-1 gene as well as a nonconventional class 1 integron with dfrA12-aadA2 gene cassettes in its variable region, and a sul3 gene in the 3' conserved segment. Restriction analysis suggested a novel pSLT variant. The results obtained underline the role of swine as a potential reservoir for the blaTEM-1-IncFII-plasmids. The occurrence and spread of virulence- and MDR-conferring plasmids should be considered as a potential public health problem.
    Microbial drug resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.) 06/2013; · 1.99 Impact Factor
  • Euro surveillance: bulletin europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin 01/2013; 18(11). · 5.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Poultry have been suggested as a reservoir for fluoroquinolone-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC). Our aim was to investigate whether genotypes associated with ciprofloxacin and multidrug resistance were shared among human and avian E. coli. We compared 277 human ExPEC isolates from urinary tract infection (UTI) and sepsis (142 susceptible and 135 ciprofloxacin resistant) and 101 avian isolates (68 susceptible and 33 ciprofloxacin resistant) by antimicrobial resistance phenotype, phylogenetic group and multilocus sequence type (ST). Most ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates from both human and avian sources were multidrug resistant. Human and avian isolates strongly differed in phylogenetic group assignment (B2 and A predominated among human and avian isolates, respectively), but a shift towards group A associated with ciprofloxacin resistance was observed among human isolates (8/100, 8.0% versus 17/87, 19.5%, P =0.021 for UTI and 5/42, 11.9% versus 15/48, 31.3%, P = 0.028 for sepsis). Heterogeneity of ST clones was observed, with ST131 strongly predominant in human ciprofloxacin-resistant strains (58/135, 43.0%), but not in avian strains. However, two major ST clonal complexes (CCs; CC10 and CC23, both belonging to group A) associated with ciprofloxacin resistance and multiresistance were shared by human and avian isolates. The major human and avian E. coli ST clones associated with multidrug resistance were identified. A subset of ST clones belonging to CC10 and CC23 poses a potential zoonotic risk.
    Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 01/2012; 67(4):860-7. · 5.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to sequence the chromosomal region conferring resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracycline (R-type ASSuT) in a Salmonella Typhimurium (STM) monophasic strain (4,[5],12:i:-) belonging to the PFGE profile STYMXB.0079. The presence of this resistance region and the analysis of its genetic environment was investigated in a selection of strains. A Sau3A1 genomic library was used to determine the nucleotide sequence of the genomic resistance region. PCRs were performed on 10 epidemiologically unrelated Salmonella strains, both STM and monophasic STM, with R-type ASSuT and PFGE profile STYMXB.0079, in order to investigate the presence of the resistance genes, the left and right junctions and the internal regions of the resistance region, as well as the genetic environment. The genomic resistance region consisted of two regions, resistance region 1 (RR1), conferring resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin and sulphonamides, and resistance region 2 (RR2), conferring tetracycline resistance. These resistance regions were both surrounded by IS26 elements and sequence comparative analysis showed 99% sequence identity with a region of plasmid pO111_1 from an Escherichia coli strain. All 10 strains were positive for the four resistance genes, the left and right junctions and the internal regions of RR1 and RR2. Concerning the genetic environment, all the strains lacked the STM1053-1997 and STM2694 genes, while only monophasic STM strains showed deletion of the fljA-fljB operon. This study describes two resistance regions localized on the bacterial chromosome of a clonal lineage of STM and monophasic STM that are widespread in Italy.
    Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 01/2012; 67(1):111-4. · 5.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract OBJECTIVES: Poultry have been suggested as a reservoir for fluoroquinolone-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC). Our aim was to investigate whether genotypes associated with ciprofloxacin and multidrug resistance were shared among human and avian E. coli. METHODS: We compared 277 human ExPEC isolates from urinary tract infection (UTI) and sepsis (142 susceptible and 135 ciprofloxacin resistant) and 101 avian isolates (68 susceptible and 33 ciprofloxacin resistant) by antimicrobial resistance phenotype, phylogenetic group and multilocus sequence type (ST). RESULTS: Most ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates from both human and avian sources were multidrug resistant. Human and avian isolates strongly differed in phylogenetic group assignment (B2 and A predominated among human and avian isolates, respectively), but a shift towards group A associated with ciprofloxacin resistance was observed among human isolates (8/100, 8.0% versus 17/87, 19.5%, P = 0.021 for UTI and 5/42, 11.9% versus 15/48, 31.3%, P = 0.028 for sepsis). Heterogeneity of ST clones was observed, with ST131 strongly predominant in human ciprofloxacin-resistant strains (58/135, 43.0%), but not in avian strains. However, two major ST clonal complexes (CCs; CC10 and CC23, both belonging to group A) associated with ciprofloxacin resistance and multiresistance were shared by human and avian isolates. CONCLUSIONS: The major human and avian E. coli ST clones associated with multidrug resistance were identified. A subset of ST clones belonging to CC10 and CC23 poses a potential zoonotic risk.
    Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 01/2012; · 5.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract OBJECTIVES: Poultry have been suggested as a reservoir for fluoroquinolone-resistant extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC). Our aim was to investigate whether genotypes associated with ciprofloxacin and multidrug resistance were shared among human and avian E. coli. METHODS: We compared 277 human ExPEC isolates from urinary tract infection (UTI) and sepsis (142 susceptible and 135 ciprofloxacin resistant) and 101 avian isolates (68 susceptible and 33 ciprofloxacin resistant) by antimicrobial resistance phenotype, phylogenetic group and multilocus sequence type (ST). RESULTS: Most ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates from both human and avian sources were multidrug resistant. Human and avian isolates strongly differed in phylogenetic group assignment (B2 and A predominated among human and avian isolates, respectively), but a shift towards group A associated with ciprofloxacin resistance was observed among human isolates (8/100, 8.0% versus 17/87, 19.5%, P = 0.021 for UTI and 5/42, 11.9% versus 15/48, 31.3%, P = 0.028 for sepsis). Heterogeneity of ST clones was observed, with ST131 strongly predominant in human ciprofloxacin-resistant strains (58/135, 43.0%), but not in avian strains. However, two major ST clonal complexes (CCs; CC10 and CC23, both belonging to group A) associated with ciprofloxacin resistance and multiresistance were shared by human and avian isolates. CONCLUSIONS: The major human and avian E. coli ST clones associated with multidrug resistance were identified. A subset of ST clones belonging to CC10 and CC23 poses a potential zoonotic risk.
    JAC. 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: During 2005-2006, Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis strains isolated from human and non-human sources and resistant to ampicillin (A), chloramphenicol (C), streptomycin (S), sulphonamide (Su), tetracycline (T), kanamycin (K) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Sxt) emerged in Italy. The aim of this study was to analyse the molecular basis of antibiotic resistance and to evaluate the clonal origin of multiresistant S. Infantis strains isolated from different sources. Seventy S. Infantis strains, susceptible or resistant to antimicrobial drugs, were chosen for this study. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conjugation experiments were performed to identify and localise the resistance genes in multidrug-resistant strains. PCR-based replicon typing was carried out for characterisation of conjugative plasmids. All strains were tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) according to the PulseNet protocol, and cluster analysis was performed using BioNumerics software. Strains with resistance (R)-type ACSSuTKSxt harboured bla(TEM-1), strA-B, sul2, tet(B), catA1 and aphA-1 resistance genes as well as a 2.2-kb class 1 integron containing folA, catB3, aadA4 and sul1 gene cassettes. A unique plasmid, belonging to the HI1 incompatibility group, harboured all the resistance genes. Cluster analysis showed that all ACSSuTKSxt-resistant strains belonged to a large cluster (A) with >90% genetic similarity. The presence of a plasmid harbouring all the resistance gene cassettes as well as molecular typing by PFGE demonstrated the circulation of a cluster of S. Infantis R-type ACSSuTKSxt during 2005-2006 in Italy. The presence of a plasmid conferring multidrug resistance could have facilitated the spread of a group of similar isolates through a variety of sources.
    International journal of antimicrobial agents 08/2011; 38(5):384-9. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Salmonella enterica serovar Napoli is an emerging serovar in Italy, France, and Switzerland, but little is known about its pathogenicity to humans. A collection of 112 strains of Salmonella Napoli isolated in Italy from human cases, foods of animal origin, and the environment have been characterized by the detection of a set of virulence genes, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antibiotic susceptibility. All the strains examined were susceptible to all the antimicrobials tested. The Salmonella pathogenicity islands genes ssaQ, mgtC spi_4D, and sopB were present from 75.0% to 100% of the tested strains. Only one human and four environmental strains showed the avrA gene. The phage-related sopE1 gene was present in 93% of the strains, whereas sodC1 and gipA genes were only in four and two environmental strains, respectively. The bcfC fimbrial gene was present in all the animal/food strains, in the 71.4% of environmental strains, and in 46.8% of the human strains, respectively. Overall, we observed 10 distinct virulence profiles (VP), but VP1-2-3 included 99 out of 112 strains. PFGE showed that 103 out of 111 isolates were grouped in four major clusters and three minor clusters, whereas two strains were totally unrelated. The most represented PFGE clusters mainly correlated with the virulotypes are VP1, VP2, and VP3. Salmonella Napoli shows an array of virulence genes similar to other serovars considered of public health importance and confirming its capability to cause infection in human. Concerning possible source of infection or reservoirs, the results did not point out any, but our hypothesis is that the environment can act as the main reservoir for Salmonella Napoli, and from there it can spill over to animals and humans. Further studies are needed to increase the knowledge on the ecology of Salmonella Napoli serovar and on the main risk factors for human infection.
    Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 05/2011; 8(9):997-1003. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by Vibrio cholerae O137 in an immunocompromised 49-year-old man. The infection was acquired following a minor traumatic injury and exposure to seawater during the summer of 2009 in Italy. Although highly immunocompromised, the patient survived. The strain was cytotoxic, invasive, and adhesive and contained a fragment of the El Tor-like hemolysin (El Tor hlyA) gene.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 02/2011; 49(2):757-9. · 4.16 Impact Factor
  • Journal of clinical gastroenterology 02/2011; 45(5):474-5. · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Medical Microbiology 12/2010; 59(Pt 12):1538-40. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Risk factors for gastric cancer (GC) include inter-individual variability in the inflammatory response to Helicobacter pylori infection, in the ability of detoxifying DNA reactive species and repairing DNA damage generated by oxidative stress and dietary carcinogens. To evaluate the association between polymorphic DNA repair genes and GC risk, a case-control study including 314 histologically confirmed GC patients and 548 healthy controls was conducted in a GC high-risk area in Tuscany, Italy. Polymorphic variants of base excision repair (APE1-D148E, XRCC1-R194W, XRCC1-R399Q and OGG1-S326C), nucleotide excision repair (XPC-PAT, XPA-23G>A, ERCC1-19007T>C and XPD-L751Q), recombination (XRCC3-T241M) and alkylation damage reversal (MGMT-L84F) were tested for their potential role in the development of GC by using logistic regression models. The same population was also characterised for GSTT1 and GSTM1 variant alleles to search for possible functional interactions between metabolic and DNA repair genotypes by two-way interactions using multivariate logistic models. No significant association between any single DNA repair genotype and GC risk was detected with a borderline association with the XPC-PAT homozygous genotype [odds ratio (OR) =1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.94-2.17]. Gene-gene interaction analysis revealed combinations of unfavourable genotypes involving either multiple DNA repair polymorphisms or DNA repair and GST-specific genotypes. The combination of the XPC-PAT and the XPA variant alleles significantly increased GC risk (OR=2.15; 95% CI 1.17-3.93, P=0.0092). A significant interaction was also found between the APE1 wild-type genotype and either the single GSTT1 (OR=4.90; 95% CI 2.38-10.11, P=0.0079) or double GSTM1-GSTT1 null (OR=7.84; 95% CI 3.19-19.22, P=0.0169) genotypes or the XPA-mutant allele (OR=3.56; 95% CI 1.53-8.25, P=0.0012). These findings indicate that a complex interaction between host factors such as oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity and efficiency of multiple DNA repair pathways underlies the inter-individual variability in GC risk.
    Mutagenesis 11/2010; 25(6):569-75. · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Quinolone and β-lactam resistance mechanisms and clonal relationships were characterized among Escherichia coli isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and extended-spectrum cephalosporins associated with human extra-intestinal infections in Rome. The E. coli. ST131 clone was found to be prevalent. This clone invariably carried a specific pattern of substitutions in the topoisomerase genes and all isolates but one produced CTX-M-15. One ST131 isolate produced SHV-12. The new ST131 variant described here is of particular concern because it combines fluoroquinolone resistance and chromosomally encoded CTX-M-15.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 10/2010; 16(10):1555-8. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Med-Vet-Net WP 21 project group investigated the molecular epidemiology of Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) in enteric bacteria other than the pandemic S. Typhimurium DT104 in a collection of European bacterial isolates of different origins. Some S. Typhimurium isolates showed the penta-resistance ACSSuT indicating the presence of SGI1, but were tested negative for this structure. Out of this collection we selected 16 isolates for the present study. All were tested for their antimicrobial genetic background, as well as for the presence of the pSLT Salmonella virulence plasmid. Two Italian S. Typhimurium isolates carried virulence-resistance plasmids with the characteristics of the virulence-resistance plasmid pUO-StVR2: IncFII plasmids (>=140 kb) with spvC and a class 1 integron with the variable region 2000 bp/ blaOXA1-aadA1. Nine isolates were also spvC positive, lacked the 90 kb plasmid, but had different plasmids of ≥ 110 kb. Another nine isolates (8 from pigs from the UK, one from Italy) harboured IncFII (>=140 kb) virulence-resistance plasmids carrying a newly described class 1 integron detected in Portugal that has a different 3´conserved segment, and the dfrA12, aadA2, cmlA1and the sul3 genes, as well as blaTEM-1. These plasmids were tested positive for the pSLT virulence genes traT, rck and pefA. Salmonella virulence-resistance plasmids demonstrate an interesting example of plasmid evolution and present an emerging public health problem.
    International Symposium Salmonella and Salmonellosis, I3S, Saint Malo, France; 06/2010

Publication Stats

2k Citations
442.37 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1977–2014
    • Istituto Superiore di Sanità
      • • Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health
      • • Department of Infectious, Parasitic and Immune-mediated Diseases
      • • Laboratory of Virology
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 2010
    • Statens Serum Institut
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2009
    • Public Health England
      • Gastrointestinal, Emerging and Zoonotic Infections (GEZI) department
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 1993–2007
    • Sapienza University of Rome
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 2006
    • Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro
      • Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche ed Oncologia Umana (DIMO)
      Bari, Apulia, Italy
  • 2002
    • Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie
      • National Reference Laboratory for Salmonella
      Padua, Veneto, Italy
  • 1994
    • Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù
      Roma, Latium, Italy