R A Popat

Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States

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Publications (12)49.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate health status and participation restrictions in childhood extremity sarcoma survivors. DESIGN: Members of the CCSS cohort with extremity sarcomas, who completed 1995, 2003 or 2007 questionnaires, were included. Setting: Cohort Study of extremity sarcomas survivors. PARTICIPANTS: Childhood cancer survivors diagnosed and treated between 1970-1986. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Prevalence rates for poor health status in six domains and five sub-optimal social participation categories were compared by tumor location and treatment exposure with generalized estimating equations adjusted for demographic/personal factors and time/age. RESULTS: Among 1094 survivors, median age at diagnosis 13 years (range 0-20), current age 33 years (range 10-53), 49% were male, 87.5% Caucasian, and 75% had lower extremity tumors. In adjusted models, when compared to upper extremity survivors, lower extremity survivors had increased risk of activity limitations but lower risk of not completing college. Compared to those who did not have surgery, those with limb-sparing (LS) and upper extremity amputations (UEA) were 1.6 times more likely to report functional impairment; while those with an above the knee amputation (AKA) were 1.9 times more likely to report functional impairment. Survivors treated with LS were 1.5 times more likely to report activity limitations. Survivors undergoing LS were more likely to report inactivity, incomes < $20,000, unemployment and no college degree. Those with UEA more likely reported inactivity, unmarried status and no college degree. Lastly, those with AKA more likely reported no college degree. Treatment with abdominal irradiation was associated with increased risk of poor mental health, functional impairment and activity limitation. CONCLUSION: Treatment for lower extremity sarcomas is associated with a 50% increased risk for activity limitations; upper extremity survivors are at 10% higher risk for not completing college. Type of local control influences health status and participation restrictions. Both these outcomes decline with age.
    Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation 02/2013; · 2.18 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Neurology 09/2011; 18(9):e109. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine genetic associations of polymorphisms in the dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) and D3 (DRD3) genes with risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). The study included 1325 newly diagnosed patients with PD and 1735 controls from a consortium of five North American case-control studies. We collected risk factor information by in-person or telephone interview. Six DRD2 and two DRD3 polymorphisms were genotyped using a common laboratory. Odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression. Among non-Hispanic whites, homozygous carriers of Taq1A DRD2 (rs1800497) polymorphism had an increased risk of PD compared to homozygous wildtype carriers (OR=1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.3). In contrast, the direction of association for Taq1A polymorphism was opposite for African-Americans, showing an inverse association with PD risk (OR=0.10, 95% CI 0.2-0.7). Among white Hispanics who carried two alleles, the Ser9Gly DRD3 (rs6280) polymorphism was associated with a decreased risk of PD (OR=0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8). The inverse association of smoking with PD risk was not modified by any of the DRD2 or DRD3 polymorphisms. DRD2 polymorphisms are unlikely to be true disease-causing variants; however, three DRD2 polymorphisms (including Taq1A) may be in linkage disequilibrium with possible disease associated variants in the DRD2-ANKK1-NCAM1-TTC12 gene cluster.
    Journal of the neurological sciences 06/2011; 307(1-2):22-9. · 2.32 Impact Factor
  • V W Henderson, R A Popat
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive aging affects episodic memory and executive functions, and these vulnerable domains are postulated to be modulated by endogenous and exogenous estrogen exposures. In midlife and late-life women without dementia, estrogen effects on cognition can be examined through associations with concentrations of serum estrone and estradiol and through clinical trials of estrogen-containing hormone therapy. To this end, we reviewed published studies including at least 100 women (larger studies are less prone to publication bias) addressing associations between estrogen levels and performance on neuropsychological tests of episodic memory or executive functions (including working memory; seven studies), or that reported results of placebo-controlled clinical trials of hormone therapy with objective measures within these cognitive domains (eight studies). Results were considered separately for midlife and late-life (age≥65 years) women. There were no consistent associations between endogenous serum estrogen concentrations and episodic memory or executive functions in naturally menopausal midlife women or in older postmenopausal women. Clinical trial findings suggested no substantial impact of exogenous estrogens on episodic memory or executive functions over time frames of up to several years. A quantitative synthesis of clinical trial results supported the inference of absence of effect. This overall conclusion of no substantial effect on episodic memory or executive functions might reassure women concerned by potential adverse cognitive consequences of menopause or of relatively short-term midlife hormone therapy. There was no apparent window of opportunity during which exogenous hormones might benefit near-term cognition, but included studies provided limited power to identify such a window. Conclusions are tempered by small numbers of studies, imprecise estimates of long-term estrogen exposures, and narrow range of neuropsychological tests. Long-term (late-life) cognitive consequence of midlife estrogen exposures are poorly addressed by current data, as are cognitive consequences of surgical menopause and cognitive consequences of exogenous estrogens during the menopause transition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroactive Steroids: Focus on Human Brain.
    Neuroscience 06/2011; 191:129-38. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In 1-methyl-4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), caffeine protects neurons by blocking the adenosine receptor A2A (ADORA2A). Caffeine is primarily metabolized by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2). Our objective was to examine whether ADORA2A and CYP1A2 polymorphisms are associated with PD risk or modify the caffeine-PD association. Parkinson's Epidemiology and Genetic Associations Studies in the United States (PEGASUS) included five population-based case-control studies. One laboratory genotyped four ADORA2A and three CYP1A2 polymorphisms in 1325 PD cases and 1735 age- and sex-matched controls. Information regarding caffeine (coffee) consumption and other lifestyle factors came from structured in-person or telephone interviews. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Two ADORA2A polymorphisms were inversely associated with PD risk - rs71651683, a 5' variant (adjusted allelic OR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.33-0.80, permutation-adjusted P = 0.015) and rs5996696, a promoter region variant (adjusted OR for AC and CC genotypes compared with the AA wild-type genotype were 0.76 (95% CI 0.57-1.02) and 0.37 (95% CI 0.13-1.01), respectively (permutation-adjusted P for trend = 0.04). CYP1A2 polymorphisms were not associated with PD risk; however, the coffee-PD association was strongest among subjects homozygous for either variant allele rs762551 (P(interaction) = 0.05) or rs2470890 (P(interaction) = 0.04). In this consortium study, two ADORA2A polymorphisms were inversely associated with PD risk, but there was weak evidence of interaction with coffee consumption. In contrast, the coffee-PD association was strongest among slow metabolizers of caffeine who were homozygous carriers of the CYP1A2 polymorphisms.
    European Journal of Neurology 01/2011; 18(5):756-65. · 4.16 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Neurology 01/2011; 18(9). · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease (PD), we compared the cumulative incidence of PD among first-degree relatives of PD cases and controls. We identified newly diagnosed patients with PD (n = 573) during 1994 to 1995 within Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program of Northern California and recruited 496 cases (87%) for the case-control study. Of 720 eligible controls matched by birth year and sex to cases, 541 (75%) agreed to participate. Information on family history of PD and other neurodegenerative diseases was obtained by in-person structured interview. We used the reconstructed cohort approach that provides a better estimate of the risk. The cumulative incidence of PD was significantly higher among relatives of PD patients compared with relatives of controls (2.0 vs. 0.7%; relative risk (RR) = 3.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-5.9; P = 0.0001). The degree of familial aggregation was higher among first-degree relatives of Hispanic PD cases compared with Hispanic controls (3.7% vs. 0.4%; RR = 8.5, 95% CI 1.0-68.9) than it was among non-Hispanic Caucasian cases and controls (2.0% vs. 0.8%; RR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.1; P = 0.02). The familial aggregation of PD was stronger among the siblings of PD cases (RR = 5.4, 95% CI 1.8-16.0) than among parents (RR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.2). The incidence and familial aggregation of PD is highest among Hispanics, warranting further studies of genetic and environmental risk factors in the Hispanic population.
    Movement Disorders 11/2010; 25(15):2587-94. · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A reliable and valid questionnaire for screening restless legs syndrome (RLS) is essential for determining accurate estimates of disease frequency. In a 2002 NIH-sponsored workshop, experts suggested three mandatory questions for identifying RLS in epidemiologic studies. We evaluated the reliability and validity of this RLS-NIH questionnaire in a community-based sample and concurrently developed and evaluated the utility of an expanded screening questionnaire, the RLS-EXP. The study was conducted at Kaiser Permanente of Northern California and the Stanford University Sleep Clinic. We evaluated test-retest reliability in a random sample of subjects with prior physician-assigned RLS (n=87), subjects with conditions frequently misclassified as RLS (n=31), and healthy subjects (n=9). Validity of both instruments was evaluated in a random sample of 32 subjects, and in-person examination by two RLS specialists was used as the gold standard. For the first three RLS-NIH questions, the kappa statistic for test-retest reliability ranged from 0.5 to 1.0, and sensitivity and specificity was 86% and 45%, respectively. For the subset of five questions on RLS-EXP that encompassed cardinal features for diagnosing RLS, kappas were 0.4-0.8, and sensitivity and specificity were 81% and 73%, respectively. Sensitivity of RLS-NIH is good; however, the specificity of the instrument is poor when examined in a sample that over-represents subjects with conditions that are commonly misclassified as RLS. Specificity can be improved by including separate questions on cardinal features, as used in the RLS-EXP, and by including a few questions that identify RLS mimics, thereby reducing false positives.
    Sleep Medicine 02/2010; 11(2):154-60. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammatory processes may be involved in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We examined the association of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with the risk of ALS in case-control study of incident cases (n = 111) conducted within the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program of Northern California during the years 1996-2000. Controls (n = 258) randomly selected from the same population were frequency matched by age and gender to the ALS cases. Information regarding use of NSAIDs (non-aspirin and aspirin) and three classes of 'control' medications was collected by in-person structured interview. Subjects who used medication at least twice a week for at least a month were classified as 'ever users'. Multivariable logistic regression models were adjusted for age, gender, history of osteoarthritis/rheumatoid arthritis and pain, and other medication use. Overall, there was no association between NSAID use and ALS; however, some sex differences were noted for non-aspirin NSAID use. Among men, non-aspirin NSAID use was associated with a two-fold increased risk of ALS (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-3.9), whereas among women, non-aspirin NSAID use was not associated with increased ALS risk (adjusted OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.2-1.2). ALS risk was not associated with aspirin use or with 'control' medications. This study did not find any evidence to suggest that NSAID use reduces the risk of ALS. The observed sex differences with non-aspirin NSAID use could be due to chance or an unmeasured confounder.
    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: official publication of the World Federation of Neurology Research Group on Motor Neuron Diseases 07/2007; 8(3):157-63. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify clinical and demographic factors associated with long-term disability in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. We searched the MEDLINE (1966-May 2005), EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane, and PsycINFO computerized databases, and reviewed reference lists of retrieved articles. We included studies that examined predictors of long-term disability in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. We excluded studies that did not distinguish relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis from primary progressive multiple sclerosis, enrolled fewer than 40 subjects, observed subjects for less than 5 years, or collected follow-up information in less than 80% of the inception cohort. Two reviewers assessed study quality in 4 domains: cohort assembly, definitions and assessments of prognostic factors and outcomes, and statistical methods. One reviewer extracted data on the direction, magnitude, precision, and statistical significance of the effect of each predictor on prognosis. Heterogeneity of study designs precluded us from pooling the results of 27 eligible studies. Study quality was limited by cross-sectional design, enrollment of prevalent cases from referral centers, and lack of multivariate adjustment. Sphincter symptoms at onset (hazard ratio, 1.1-3.1), incomplete recovery from the first attack (hazard ratio, 1.3-3.3), and a short interval between the first and second attack (hazard ratio, 1.6-1.9) were most strongly and consistently associated with poor prognosis. Other factors widely believed to be of prognostic importance, including sex and age at onset, demonstrated inconsistent or weak effects on prognosis. The most robust predictors of long-term physical disability in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis are sphincter symptoms at onset and early disease course outcomes. These factors can be used to guide treatment decisions for drugs with significant toxicities.
    JAMA Neurology 01/2007; 63(12):1686-91. · 7.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the associations of reproductive factors and postmenopausal hormone use with the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) among women. This case-control study was conducted within the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program (KPMCP) of Northern California during the years 1996-2000. Among the 193 postmenopausal women, 62 were incident ALS cases and 131 were controls randomly selected from KPMCP members and frequency matched by age and respondent type (self versus proxy) to the cases. Statistical analyses were carried out using logistic regression. Reproductive factors such as age at menarche, age at final menstrual period, parity, oral contraceptive use, and type of menopause (natural vs. hysterectomy with or without oophorectomy) were not associated with risk of ALS. Postmenopausal hormone use was positively, but not significantly, associated with the risk of ALS (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 0.9-3.8). Reproductive factors were not associated with ALS risk. There is no evidence that suggests a protective effect of postmenopausal hormone use against the development of ALS. However, due to insufficient power, we cannot rule out a possible increase in ALS risk associated with postmenopausal hormone use.
    Neuroepidemiology 02/2006; 27(3):117-21. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Parkinson disease (PD) is less common in women possibly because of hormonal or reproductive influences. The objective of this study was to evaluate the associations of reproductive factors and postmenopausal hormone use with the risk of PD among postmenopausal women. Incident cases (n = 178) and randomly selected age-matched controls (n = 189) who were members of the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program (KPMCP) of Northern California participated in the study conducted during the years 1994 to 1995. Statistical analyses were carried out using logistic regression. The association of postmenopausal hormone use with PD risk depended on the type of menopause. Among women with history of a hysterectomy with or without an oophorectomy, estrogen use alone was associated with a 2.6-fold increased risk (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% CI: 1.1 to 6.1) and significant trends in the risk of PD were observed with increasing duration of estrogen use, but disease risk was not influenced by recency of use. In contrast, among women with natural menopause, no increased risk of PD was observed with hormone use (estrogen alone or a combined estrogen-progestin regimen). Early age at final menstrual period (44 years or younger) was associated with reduction in risk (adjusted OR 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3 to 1.0). Age at menarche and parity were not associated with the risk of PD. Postmenopausal use of estrogen alone may increase the risk of Parkinson disease (PD) among women with a hysterectomy. Among women with natural menopause for whom the usual treatment is combined estrogen-progestin therapy, no increased risk of PD was observed.
    Neurology 09/2005; 65(3):383-90. · 8.25 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

159 Citations
49.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2011
    • Stanford University
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Health Research and Policy
      Stanford, CA, United States
  • 2007–2010
    • Stanford Medicine
      • Division of Epidemiology
      Stanford, California, United States