J. J. Bock

California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, United States

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Publications (396)641.64 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Planck CMB temperature maps allow detection of large-scale departures from homogeneity and isotropy. We search for topology with a fundamental domain nearly intersecting the last scattering surface (comoving distance $\chi_r$). For most topologies studied the likelihood maximized over orientation shows some preference for multi-connected models just larger than $\chi_r$. This effect is also present in simulated realizations of isotropic maps and we interpret it as the alignment of mild anisotropic correlations with chance features in a single realization; such a feature can also exist, in milder form, when the likelihood is marginalized over orientations. Thus marginalized, the limits on the radius $R_i$ of the largest sphere inscribed in a topological domain (at log-likelihood-ratio -5) are: in a flat Universe, $R_i>0.9\chi_r$ for the cubic torus (cf. $R_i>0.9\chi_r$ at 99% CL for a matched-circles search); $R_i>0.7\chi_r$ for the chimney; $R_i>0.5\chi_r$ for the slab; in a positively curved Universe, $R_i>1.0\chi_r$ for the dodecahedron; $R_i>1.0\chi_r$ for the truncated cube; $R_i>0.9\chi_r$ for the octahedron. Similar limits apply to alternate topologies. We perform a Bayesian search for an anisotropic Bianchi VII$_h$ geometry. In a non-physical setting where the Bianchi parameters are decoupled from cosmology, Planck data favour a Bianchi component with a Bayes factor of at least 1.5 units of log-evidence: a Bianchi pattern is efficient at accounting for some large-scale anomalies in Planck data. However, the cosmological parameters are in strong disagreement with those found from CMB anisotropy data alone. In the physically motivated setting where the Bianchi parameters are fitted simultaneously with standard cosmological parameters, we find no evidence for a Bianchi VII$_h$ cosmology and constrain the vorticity of such models: $(\omega/H)_0<8\times10^{-10}$ (95% CL). [Abridged]
    03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The ESA's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the CMB and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the SZ effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter LCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25 sigma. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations derived from CMB data and that derived from SZ data. The Planck and WMAP power spectra are offset from each other by an average level of about 2% around the first acoustic peak.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics (Submitted). 03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Using \Planck\ data combined with the Meta Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC), we address the study of peculiar motions by searching for evidence of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (kSZ). By implementing various filters designed to extract the kSZ generated at the positions of the clusters, we obtain consistent constraints on the radial peculiar velocity average, root mean square (rms), and local bulk flow amplitude at different depths. For the whole cluster sample of average redshift 0.18, the measured average radial peculiar velocity with respect to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at that redshift, i.e., the kSZ monopole, amounts to $72 \pm 60$ km s$^{-1}$. This constitutes less than 1% of the relative Hubble velocity of the cluster sample with respect to our local CMB frame. While the linear $\Lambda$CDM prediction for the typical cluster radial velocity rms at $z=0.15$ is close to 230km s$^{-1}$, the upper limit imposed by \Planck\ data on the cluster subsample corresponds to 800 km s$^{-1}$ at 95% confidence level, i.e., about three times higher. \Planck\ data also set strong constraints on the local bulk flow in volumes centred on the Local Group. There is no detection of bulk flow as measured in any comoving sphere extending to the maximum redshift covered by the cluster sample. A blind search for bulk flows in this sample has an upper limit of 254 km s$^{-1}$ (95% confidence level) dominated by CMB confusion and instrumental noise, indicating that the Universe is largely homogeneous on Gpc scales. In this context, in conjunction with supernova observations, \Planck\ is able to rule out a large class of inhomogeneous void models as alternatives to dark energy or modified gravity. The \Planck\ constraints on peculiar velocities and bulk flows are thus consistent with the $\Lambda$CDM scenario.
    03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We present constraints on cosmological parameters using number counts as a function of redshift for a sub-sample of 189 galaxy clusters from the Planck SZ (PSZ) catalogue. The PSZ is selected through the signature of the Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect, and the sub-sample used here has a signal-to-noise threshold of seven, with each object confirmed as a cluster and all but one with a redshift estimate. We discuss the completeness of the sample and our construction of a likelihood analysis. Using a relation between mass $M$ and SZ signal $Y$ calibrated to X-ray measurements, we derive constraints on the power spectrum amplitude $\sigma_8$ and matter density parameter $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}$ in a flat $\Lambda$CDM model. We test the robustness of our estimates and find that possible biases in the $Y$--$M$ relation and the halo mass function are larger than the statistical uncertainties from the cluster sample. Assuming the X-ray determined mass to be biased low relative to the true mass by between zero and 30%, motivated by comparison of the observed mass scaling relations to those from a set of numerical simulations, we find that $\sigma_8=0.75\pm 0.03$, $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}=0.29\pm 0.02$, and $\sigma_8(\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}/0.27)^{0.3} = 0.764 \pm 0.025$. The value of $\sigma_8$ is degenerate with the mass bias; if the latter is fixed to a value of 20% we find $\sigma_8(\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}/0.27)^{0.3}=0.78\pm 0.01$ and a tighter one-dimensional range $\sigma_8=0.77\pm 0.02$. We find that the larger values of $\sigma_8$ and $\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}$ preferred by Planck's measurements of the primary CMB anisotropies can be accommodated by a mass bias of about 40%. Alternatively, consistency with the primary CMB constraints can be achieved by inclusion of processes that suppress power on small scales relative to the $\Lambda$CDM model, such as a component of massive neutrinos (abridged).
    03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the all-sky Planck catalogue of clusters and cluster candidates derived from Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect detections using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. The catalogue contains 1227 entries, making it over six times the size of the Planck Early SZ (ESZ) sample and the largest SZ-selected catalogue to date. It contains 861 confirmed clusters, of which 178 have been confirmed as clusters, mostly through follow-up observations, and a further 683 are previously-known clusters. The remaining 366 have the status of cluster candidates, and we divide them into three classes according to the quality of evidence that they are likely to be true clusters. The Planck SZ catalogue is the deepest all-sky cluster catalogue, with redshifts up to about one, and spans the broadest cluster mass range from (0.1 to 1.6) 10^{15}Msun. Confirmation of cluster candidates through comparison with existing surveys or cluster catalogues is extensively described, as is the statistical characterization of the catalogue in terms of completeness and statistical reliability. The outputs of the validation process are provided as additional information. This gives, in particular, an ensemble of 813 cluster redshifts, and for all these Planck clusters we also include a mass estimated from a newly-proposed SZ-mass proxy. A refined measure of the SZ Compton parameter for the clusters with X-ray counter-parts is provided, as is an X-ray flux for all the Planck clusters not previously detected in X-ray surveys.
    03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The Planck satellite provides a set of all-sky maps at nine frequencies from 30 GHz to 857 GHz. Planets, minor bodies, and diffuse interplanetary dust emission (IPD) are all observed. The IPD can be separated from Galactic and other emissions because Planck views a given point on the celestial sphere multiple times, through different columns of IPD. We use the Planck data to investigate the behaviour of zodiacal emission over the whole sky at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths. We fit the Planck data to find the emissivities of the various components of the COBE zodiacal model -- a diffuse cloud, three asteroidal dust bands, a circumsolar ring, and an Earth-trailing feature. The emissivity of the diffuse cloud decreases with increasing wavelength, as expected from earlier analyses. The emissivities of the dust bands, however, decrease less rapidly, indicating that the properties of the grains in the bands are different from those in the diffuse cloud. We fit the small amount of Galactic emission seen through the telescope's far sidelobes, and place limits on possible contamination of the CMB results from both zodiacal and far-sidelobe emission. When necessary, the results are used in the Planck pipeline to make maps with zodiacal emission and far sidelobes removed. We show that the zodiacal correction to the CMB maps is small compared to the Planck CMB temperature power spectrum and give a list of flux densities for small Solar System bodies.
    ArXiv e-prints. 03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: On the arcminute angular scales probed by Planck, the CMB anisotropies are gently perturbed by gravitational lensing. Here we present a detailed study of this effect, detecting lensing independently in the 100, 143, and 217GHz frequency bands with an overall significance of greater than 25sigma. We use the temperature-gradient correlations induced by lensing to reconstruct a (noisy) map of the CMB lensing potential, which provides an integrated measure of the mass distribution back to the CMB last-scattering surface. Our lensing potential map is significantly correlated with other tracers of mass, a fact which we demonstrate using several representative tracers of large-scale structure. We estimate the power spectrum of the lensing potential, finding generally good agreement with expectations from the best-fitting LCDM model for the Planck temperature power spectrum, showing that this measurement at z=1100 correctly predicts the properties of the lower-redshift, later-time structures which source the lensing potential. When combined with the temperature power spectrum, our measurement provides degeneracy-breaking power for parameter constraints; it improves CMB-alone constraints on curvature by a factor of two and also partly breaks the degeneracy between the amplitude of the primordial perturbation power spectrum and the optical depth to reionization, allowing a measurement of the optical depth to reionization which is independent of large-scale polarization data. Discarding scale information, our measurement corresponds to a 4% constraint on the amplitude of the lensing potential power spectrum, or a 2% constraint on the RMS amplitude of matter fluctuations at z~2.
    03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: In the past decade, our understanding of galaxy evolution has been revolutionized by the discovery that luminous, dusty starburst galaxies were 1,000 times more abundant in the early Universe than at present. It has, however, been difficult to measure the complete redshift distribution of these objects, especially at the highest redshifts (z > 4). Here we report a redshift survey at a wavelength of three millimetres, targeting carbon monoxide line emission from the star-forming molecular gas in the direction of extraordinarily bright millimetre-wave-selected sources. High-resolution imaging demonstrates that these sources are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. We detect spectral lines in 23 out of 26 sources and multiple lines in 12 of those 23 sources, from which we obtain robust, unambiguous redshifts. At least 10 of the sources are found to lie at z > 4, indicating that the fraction of dusty starburst galaxies at high redshifts is greater than previously thought. Models of lens geometries in the sample indicate that the background objects are ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, powered by extreme bursts of star formation.
    Nature 03/2013; · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have conducted a blind redshift survey in the 3 mm atmospheric transmission window for 26 strongly lensd dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The sources were selected to have S_1.4mm>20 mJy and a dust-like spectrum and, to remove low-z sources, not have bright radio (S_843MHz<6mJy) or far-infrared counterparts (S_100um<1 Jy, S_60um<200mJy). We robustly detect 44 line features in our survey, which we identify as redshifted emission lines of 12CO, 13CO, [CI], H2O, and H2O+. We find one or more spectral features in 23 sources yielding a ~90% detection rate for this survey; in 12 of these sources we detect multiple lines, while in 11 sources we detect only a single line. For the sources with only one detected line, we break the redshift degeneracy with additional spectroscopic observations if available, or infer the most likely line identification based on photometric data. This yields secure redshifts for ~70% of the sample. The three sources with no lines detected are tentatively placed in the redshift desert between 1.7<z<2.0. The resulting mean redshift of our sample is =3.5. This finding is in contrast to the redshift distribution of radio-identified DSFGs, which have a significantly lower mean redshift of =2.3 and for which only 10-15% of the population is expected to be at z>3. We discuss the effect of gravitational lensing on the redshift distribution and compare our measured redshift distribution to that of models in the literature.
    The Astrophysical Journal 03/2013; 767(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the past decade, our understanding of galaxy evolution has been revolutionized by the discovery that luminous, dusty, starburst galaxies were 1,000 times more abundant in the early Universe than at present. It has, however, been difficult to measure the complete redshift 2 distribution of these objects, especially at the highest redshifts (z > 4). Here we report a redshift survey at a wavelength of three millimeters, targeting carbon monoxide line emission from the star-forming molecular gas in the direction of extraordinarily bright millimetrewave-selected sources. High-resolution imaging demonstrates that these sources are strongly gravitationally lensed by foreground galaxies. We detect spectral lines in 23 out of 26 sources and multiple lines in 12 of those 23 sources, from which we obtain robust, unambiguous redshifts. At least 10 of the sources are found to lie at z > 4, indicating that the fraction of dusty starburst galaxies at high redshifts is greater than previously thought. Models of lens geometries in the sample indicate that the background objects are ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, powered by extreme bursts of star formation.
    03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Using Planck data combined with the Meta Catalogue of X-ray detected Clusters of galaxies (MCXC), we address the study of peculiar motions by searching for evidence of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (kSZ). By implementing various filters designed to extract the kSZ generated at the positions of the clusters, we obtain consistent constraints on the radial peculiar velocity average, root mean square (rms), and local bulk flow amplitude at different depths. For the whole cluster sample of average redshift 0.18, the measured average radial peculiar velocity with respect to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at that redshift, i.e., the kSZ monopole, amounts to 72 ± 60 kms−1. This constitutes less than 1% of the relative Hubble velocity of the cluster sample with respect to our local CMB frame. From a subset of this cluster sample Planck finds the radial peculiar velocity rms to be below 800 kms−1 at the 95% confidence level, which is around three times the �CDM prediction for the typical cluster radial velocity rms at z = 0.15. Planck data also set strong constraints on the local bulk flow in volumes centred on the Local Group. There is no detection of bulk flow as measured in any comoving sphere extending to the maximum redshift covered by the cluster sample. A blind search for bulk flows in this sample has an upper limit of 254 kms−1 (95% confidence level) dominated by CMB confusion and instrumental noise, indicating that the Universe is largely homogeneous on Gpc scales. In this context, in conjunction with supernova observations, Planck is able to rule out a large class of inhomogeneous void models as alternatives to dark energy or modified gravity. The Planck constraints on peculiar velocities and bulk flows are thus consistent with the �CDM scenario.
    03/2013;
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    ArXiv e-prints. 03/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We built membrane-isolated transition-edge sensors (TESs) for the background-limited infrared/sub-mm spectrograph using Mo/Cu superconducting bilayer thermistors of varying geometry and found that undesired proximity effects, including the so-called longitudinal proximity effect (LoPE) and the latitudinal inverse proximity effect, affect both the superconducting transition temperature TC and the sharpness of the transition α = dlogR/dlogT. The LoPE and latitudinal inverse proximity effect arise because of unintentional proximity effects between the bilayer thermistors, the superconducting wiring of the TES circuitry, and normal metal decorations added to mitigate the LoPE. We examined Mo/Cu bilayer films with widths of 120 μm and lengths of 5, 10, 20, 40, and 120 μm, and studied the variation of TC, α, and approximate 80% resistance per square (R0.8) with Ti (TC ~ 500 mK) and TiN (TC ~ 3.8 K) wiring to the devices. We found larger α values in general for the Ti wiring, where α was as high as 90 for 20-120 μm devices and decreased to 20 for 5-μm-wide devices. We then built arrays of TESs with bilayer thermistor lengths of 10 μm, Ti contacts, TiN wiring, and Au borders. The devices were expected to demonstrate a noise equivalent power less than or equal to 10-19 W/Hz1/2. We report a measured noise equivalent power at 87 mK of (0.95 ±0.2) × 10-19 W/Hz1/2 and a response time τ of (360 ± 30)ms on our best device with a thermal conductance x1/2 = (15 ±5)fW/K, TC = (120.5 ±3.5)mK, and stray power PD = (135 ±85)aW. The thermistor had a value of RN = 6 mΩ and value of α = dlogR/dlogTbetween 10 and 60 in the transition. We compare our measured performance with the performance specifications needed for ultrasensitive TESs on the Background-Limited Infrared/Sub-mm Spectrograph (BLISS) and discuss paths forward.
    IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 01/2013; 23(3):2100104-2100104. · 1.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The design and performance of a wide bandwidth linear polarization modulator based on the Faraday effect is described. Faraday Rotation Modulators (FRMs) are solid-state polarization switches that are capable of modulation up to ~10 kHz. Six FRMs were utilized during the 2006 observing season in the Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP) experiment; three FRMs were used at each of BICEP's 100 and 150 GHz frequency bands. The technology was verified through high signal-to-noise detection of Galactic polarization using two of the six FRMs during four observing runs in 2006. The features exhibit strong agreement with BICEP's measurements of the Galaxy using non-FRM pixels and with the Galactic polarization models. This marks the first detection of high signal-to-noise mm-wave celestial polarization using fast, active optical modulation. The performance of the FRMs during periods when they were not modulated was also analyzed and compared to results from BICEP's 43 pixels without FRMs.
    The Astrophysical Journal 12/2012; 765(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The HerMES and H-ATLAS projects, using Herschel/SPIRE data, have discovered a population of ultra-red (hence high-z), faint (hence unlensed), dusty extreme star forming galaxies, which are likely among the most distant, luminous and massive known. Follow up of the first few sources has confirmed that they predominantly lie above z > 4, including one souce at z=6.3. However, current observations of these sources can only probe their young, starbursting stellar populations. In order to form a complete picture of their stellar content, as well as place the starburst within the context of the history of these systems, we request Spitzer observations of 20 such sources. In addition, this data will be sensitive to un-obscured starbursts (LBGs) associated with the same overdensity, allowing us to test whether our targets serve as signposts to high-z protoclusters as suggested by structure formation models.
    Spitzer Proposal. 12/2012;
  • 10/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We report experimental progress toward demonstrating background-limited arrays of membrane-isolated transition-edge sensors (TESs) for the Background Limited Infrared/Sub-mm Spectrograph (BLISS). BLISS is a space-borne instrument with grating spectrometers for wavelengths λ= 35-435 μm and with R= λ/Δλ~500. The goals for BLISS TESs are: noise equivalent power (NEP) = 5×10-20 W/Hz1/2 and response time τ<30ms. We expect background-limited performance from bilayers TESs with TC=65mK and G=15fW/K. However, such TESs cannot be operated at 50mK unless stray power on the devices, or dark power PD, is less than 200aW. We describe criteria for measuring PD that requires accurate knowledge of TC. Ultimately, we fabricated superconducting thermistors from Ir (TC≥135mK) and Mo/Cu proximitized bilayers, where TC is the thermistor transition temperature. We measured the Ir TES arrays in our 45mK base temperature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator test system, which can measure up to eight 1x32 arrays simultaneously using a time-division multiplexer, as well as our single-pixel test system which can measure down to 15mK. In our previous Ir array measurements our best reported performance was NEP=2.5×10-19 W/Hz1/2 and τ~5ms for straight-beam TESs. In fact, we expected NEP 1.5×10-19W/Hz1/2 for meander beam TESs, but did not achieve this previously due to 1/f noise. Here, we detail improvements toward measuring the expected NEP and demonstrate NEP=(1.3+/-0.2)×10-19W/Hz1/2 in our single-pixel test system and NEP=(1.6+/-0.3)×10-19W/Hz1/2 in our array test system.
    Proc SPIE 09/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: We are developing the Background-Limited Infrared-Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) for SPICA to provide a breakthrough capability for far-IR survey spectroscopy. The 3.2-meter, actively-cooled (T<6K) SPICA telescope allows mid-IR to submm observations which are limited only by the natural backgrounds, and BLISS is designed to operate near this fundamental limit. BLISS-SPICA provide a line sensitivity of 10-20 W m-2 , thereby enabling spectroscopy of dust-obscured galaxies at all epochs back to the first billion years after the Big Bang (redshift 6), and study of all stages of planet formation in circumstellar disks. BLISS covers the 35-430 micron waveband at moderate resolving power (300<R<700) in six grating spec­ trometer bands, each coupling at least two 2 sky positions simultaneously. The instrument is cooled with an on-board refrigerator to 50 mK for optimal sensitivity. The detector package in the goal implementation is 4200 silicon-nitride micro-mesh leg-isolated bolometers with superconducting transition-edge-sensed (TES) thermis­ tors, read out with a cryogenic time-domain multiplexer. The instrument is designed to fit within the stringent SPICA resource allocations for mass and heat lift, and to mitigate the impact of cosmic rays. We report on this design and our progress in prototyping and validating the BLISS spectrometers and prototype cooler. A companion paper in Conference 8452 (A. Beyer et al.) discusses in greater detail the progress in the BLISS TES bolometer development.
    Proc SPIE 09/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Between the BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments, we have deployed over 1500 dual polarized antenna coupled bolometers to map the Cosmic Microwave Background's polarization. We have been able to rapidly deploy these detectors because they are completely planar with an integrated phased-array antenna. Through our experience in these experiments, we have learned of several challenges with this technology- specifically the beam synthesis in the antenna- and in this paper we report on how we have modified our designs to mitigate these challenges. In particular, we discus differential steering errors between the polarization pairs' beam centroids due to microstrip cross talk and gradients of penetration depth in the niobium thin films of our millimeter wave circuits. We also discuss how we have suppressed side lobe response with a Gaussian taper of our antenna illumination pattern. These improvements will be used in Spider, Polar-1, and this season's retrofit of Keck Array.
    08/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: The Keck Array (SPUD) began observing the cosmic microwave background's polarization in the winter of 2011 at the South Pole. The Keck Array follows the success of the predecessor experiments Bicep and Bicep2, using five on-axis refracting telescopes. These have a combined imaging array of 2500 antenna-coupled TES bolometers read with a SQUID-based time domain multiplexing system. We will discuss the detector noise and the optimization of the readout. The achieved sensitivity of the Keck Array is 11.5 {\mu}K_(CMB)*sqrt{s} in the 2012 configuration.
    08/2012;

Publication Stats

3k Citations
641.64 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997–2014
    • California Institute of Technology
      • • Jet Propulsion Laboratory
      • • Department of Physics
      Pasadena, California, United States
  • 2013
    • European Southern Observatory
      Arching, Bavaria, Germany
    • McGill University
      • Department of Physics
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2012
    • Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
      • Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2011
    • The Royal Observatory, Edinburgh
      Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
    • University of Colorado at Boulder
      • Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy
      Boulder, Colorado, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2004
    • Cardiff University
      • School of Physics and Astronomy
      Cardiff, WLS, United Kingdom
    • University of Wales
      Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
  • 2003
    • University of Chicago
      • Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 2002
    • Carnegie Mellon University
      • Department of Physics
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • 1995
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Physics
      Berkeley, California, United States