J. J. Bock

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (414)749.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In this work we explore the impact of the presence of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) on the mid- and far-infrared (IR) properties of galaxies as well as the effects of simultaneous AGN and starburst activity in these same galaxies. To do this we apply a multi-component, multi-band spectral synthesis technique to a sample of 250 micron selected galaxies of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, with IRS spectra available for all galaxies. Our results confirm that the inclusion of the IRS spectra plays a crucial role in the spectral analysis of galaxies with an AGN component improving the selection of the best-fit hot dust model (torus). We find a correlation between the obscured star formation rate (SFR) derived from the IR luminosity of the starburst component, SFR_IR and SFR_PAH, derived from the luminosity of the PAH features, L_PAH, with SFR_FIR taking higher values than SFR_PAH. The correlation is different for AGN- and starburst-dominated objects. The ratio of L_PAH to that of the starburst component, L_PAH/L_SB, is almost constant for AGN-dominated objects but decreases with increasing L_SB for starburst-dominated objects. SFR_FIR increases with the accretion luminosity, L_acc, with the increase less prominent for the very brightest, unobscured AGN-dominated sources. We find no correlation between the masses of the hot and cold dust components. We interpret this as a non-constant fraction of gas driven by the gravitational effects to the AGN while the starburst is ongoing. We also find no evidence of the AGN affecting the temperature of the cold dust component, though this conclusion is mostly based on objects with a non-dominant AGN component. We conclude that our findings do not provide evidence that the presence of AGN affects the star formation process in the host galaxy, but rather that the two phenomena occur simultaneously over a wide range of luminosities.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 06/2013; 434(3). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stt1177 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the procedure used to flux calibrate the three-band submillimetre photometer in the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. This includes the equations describing the calibration scheme, a justification for using Neptune as the primary calibration source, a description of the observations and data processing procedures used to derive flux calibration parameters (for converting from voltage to flux density) for every bolometer in each array, an analysis of the error budget in the flux calibration for the individual bolometers, and tests of the flux calibration on observations of primary and secondary calibrators. The procedure for deriving the flux calibration parameters is divided into two parts. In the first part, we use observations of astronomical sources in conjunction with the operation of the photometer internal calibration source to derive the unscaled derivatives of the flux calibration curves. To scale the calibration curves in Jy/beam/V, we then use observations of Neptune in which the beam of each bolometer is mapped using Neptune observed in a very fine scan pattern. The total instrumental uncertainties in the flux calibration for the individual bolometers is ~0.5% for most bolometers, although a few bolometers have uncertainties of ~1-5% because of issues with the Neptune observations. Based on application of the flux calibration parameters to Neptune observations performed using typical scan map observing modes, we determined that measurements from each array as a whole have instrumental uncertainties of 1.5%. This is considerably less than the absolute calibration uncertainty associated with the model of Neptune, which is estimated at 4%.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 06/2013; 433(4). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stt948 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Based on CMB maps from the 2013 Planck Mission data release, this paper presents the detection of the ISW effect, i.e., the correlation between the CMB and large-scale evolving gravitational potentials. The significance of detection ranges from 2 to 4 sigma, depending on which method is used. We investigate three separate approaches, which cover essentially all previous studies, as well as breaking new ground. (i) Correlation of the CMB with the Planck reconstructed gravitational lensing potential (for the first time). This detection is made using the lensing-induced bispectrum; the correlation between lensing and the ISW effect has a significance close to 2.5 sigma. (ii) Cross-correlation with tracers of LSS, yielding around 3 sigma significance, based on a combination of radio (NVSS) and optical (SDSS) data. (iii) Aperture photometry on stacked CMB fields at the locations of known large-scale structures, which yields a 4 sigma signal when using a previously explored catalogue, but shows strong discrepancies in amplitude and scale compared to expectations. Recent catalogues give more moderate results, ranging from negligible to 2.5 sigma at most, but with a more consistent scale and amplitude, the latter being still slightly above what is expected from numerical simulations within LCMD. Where they can be compared, these measurements are compatible with previous work using data from WMAP, which had already mapped these scales to the limits of cosmic variance. Planck's broader frequency coverage confirms that the signal is achromatic, bolstering the case for ISW detection. As a final step we use tracers of large-scale structure to filter the CMB data, presenting maps of the ISW temperature perturbation. These results provide complementary and independent evidence for the existence of a dark energy component that governs the current accelerated expansion of the Universe.
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    ABSTRACT: We present the Planck likelihood, a complete statistical description of the two-point correlation function of the CMB temperature fluctuations. We use this likelihood to derive the Planck CMB power spectrum over three decades in l, covering 2 <= l <= 2500. The main source of error at l <= 1500 is cosmic variance. Uncertainties in small-scale foreground modelling and instrumental noise dominate the error budget at higher l's. For l < 50, our likelihood exploits all Planck frequency channels from 30 to 353 GHz through a physically motivated Bayesian component separation technique. At l >= 50, we employ a correlated Gaussian likelihood approximation based on angular cross-spectra derived from the 100, 143 and 217 GHz channels. We validate our likelihood through an extensive suite of consistency tests, and assess the impact of residual foreground and instrumental uncertainties on cosmological parameters. We find good internal agreement among the high-l cross-spectra with residuals of a few uK^2 at l <= 1000. We compare our results with foreground-cleaned CMB maps, and with cross-spectra derived from the 70 GHz Planck map, and find broad agreement in terms of spectrum residuals and cosmological parameters. The best-fit LCDM cosmology is in excellent agreement with preliminary Planck polarisation spectra. The standard LCDM cosmology is well constrained by Planck by l <= 1500. For example, we report a 5.4 sigma deviation from n_s /= 1. Considering various extensions beyond the standard model, we find no indication of significant departures from the LCDM framework. Finally, we report a tension between the best-fit LCDM model and the low-l spectrum in the form of a power deficit of 5-10% at l <~ 40, significant at 2.5-3 sigma. We do not elaborate further on its cosmological implications, but note that this is our most puzzling finding in an otherwise remarkably consistent dataset. (Abridged)
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    ABSTRACT: Rotational transition lines of CO play a major role in molecular radio astronomy and in particular in the study of star formation and the Galactic structure. Although a wealth of data exists in the Galactic plane and some well-known molecular clouds, there is no available CO high sensitivity all-sky survey to date. Such all-sky surveys can be constructed using the \Planck\ HFI data because the three lowest CO rotational transition lines at 115, 230 and 345 GHz significantly contribute to the signal of the 100, 217 and 353 GHz HFI channels respectively. Two different component separation methods are used to extract the CO maps from Planck HFI data. The maps obtained are then compared to one another and to existing external CO surveys. From these quality checks the best CO maps in terms of signal to noise and/or residual foreground contamination are selected. Three sets of velocity-integrated CO emission maps are produced: Type 1 maps of the CO (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational transitions with low foreground contamination but moderate signal-to-noise ratio; Type 2 maps for the (1-0) and (2-1) transitions with a better signal-to-noise ratio; and one Type 3 map, a line composite map with the best signal-to-noise ratio in order to locate the faintest molecular regions. The maps are described in detail. They are shown to be fully compatible with previous surveys of parts of the Galactic Plane and also of fainter regions out of the Galactic plane. The Planck HFI velocity-integrated CO maps for the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational transitions provide an unprecedented all-sky CO view of the Galaxy. These maps are also of great interest to monitor potential CO contamination on CMB \Planck\ studies.
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    ABSTRACT: Planck has produced detailed all-sky observations over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz. These observations allow robust reconstruction of the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations over nearly the full sky, as well as new constraints on Galactic foregrounds. This paper describes the component separation framework adopted by Planck. We test four foreground-cleaned CMB maps derived using qualitatively different component separation algorithms. The quality of our reconstructions is evaluated through detailed simulations and internal comparisons, and shown through various tests to be internally consistent and robust for CMB power spectrum and cosmological parameter estimation up to l = 2000. The parameter constraints on LambdaCDM cosmologies derived from these maps are consistent with those presented in the cross-spectrum based Planck likelihood analysis. We choose two of the CMB maps for specific scientific goals. We also present maps and frequency spectra of the Galactic low-frequency, CO, and thermal dust emission. The component maps are found to provide a faithful representation of the sky, as evaluated by simulations. For the low-frequency component, the spectral index varies widely over the sky, ranging from about beta = -4 to -2. Considering both morphology and prior knowledge of the low frequency components, the index map allows us to associate a steep spectral index (beta < -3.2) with strong anomalous microwave emission, corresponding to a spinning dust spectrum peaking below 20 GHz, a flat index of beta > -2.3 with strong free-free emission, and intermediate values with synchrotron emission.
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    ABSTRACT: We have constructed the first all-sky map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 100 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck survey. These maps show an obvious galaxy cluster tSZ signal that is well matched with blindly detected clusters in the Planck SZ catalogue. To characterize the signal in the tSZ map we have computed its angular power spectrum. At large angular scales ($\ell < 60$), the major foreground contaminant is the diffuse thermal dust emission. At small angular scales ($\ell > 500$) the clustered Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) and residual point sources are the major contaminants. These foregrounds are carefully modelled and subtracted. We measure the tSZ power spectrum in angular scales, $0.17^{\circ} \lesssim \theta \lesssim 3.0^{\circ}$, that were previously unexplored. The measured tSZ power spectrum is consistent with that expected from the Planck catalogue of SZ sources, with additional clear evidence of signal from unresolved clusters and, potentially, diffuse warm baryons. We use the tSZ power spectrum to obtain the following cosmological constraints: $\sigma_8(\Omega_{\mathrm{m}}/0.28)^{3.2/8.1}=0.784 \pm 0.016 (68% C.L.). Marginalized band-powers of the Planck tSZ power spectrum and the best-fit model are given. The non-Gaussianity of the Compton parameter map is further characterized by computing its 1D probability distribution function and its bispectrum. These are used to place additional independent constraints on $\sigma_{8}$.
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    ABSTRACT: The multi-frequency capability of the Planck satellite provides information both on the integrated history of star formation (via the cosmic infrared background, or CIB) and on the distribution of dark matter (via the lensing effect on the cosmic microwave background, or CMB). The conjunction of these two unique probes allows us to measure directly the connection between dark and luminous matter in the high redshift (1 < z <3) Universe. We use a three-point statistic optimized to detect the correlation between these two tracers. Following a thorough discussion of possible contaminants and a suite of consistency tests, using lens reconstructions at 100, 143 and 217 GHz and CIB measurements at 100-857 GHz, we report the first detection of the correlation between the CIB and CMB lensing. The well matched redshift distribution of these two signals leads to a detection significance with a peak value of 42 \sigma at 545 GHz and a correlation as high as 80% across these two tracers. Our full set of multi-frequency measurements (both CIB auto- and CIB-lensing cross-spectra) are consistent with a simple halo-based model, with a characteristic mass scale for the halos hosting CIB sources of log_{10}(M/M_sun) = 10.5 \pm 0.6. Leveraging the frequency dependence of our signal, we isolate the high redshift contribution to the CIB, and constrain the star formation rate (SFR) density at z>1. We measure directly the SFR density with around 2 sigma significance for three redshift bins between z=1 and 7, thus opening a new window into the study of the formation of stars at early times.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the detection, interpretation and removal of the signal resulting from interactions of high energy particles with the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI). These interactions fall into two categories, heating the 0.1K bolometer plate and glitches in each detector time stream. Glitch shapes are not simple single pole exponential decays and fall into three families. The glitch shape for each family has been characterized empirically in flight data and removed from the detector time streams. The spectrum of the count rate per unit energy is computed for each family and a correspondence to where on the detector the particle hit is made. Most of the detected glitches are from galactic protons incident on the Si die frame supporting the micromachinced bolometric detectors. At HFI, the particle flux is � 5 cm􀀀2 s􀀀1 and is dominated by protons incident on the spacecraft with an energy >39MeV, leading to a rate of typically one event per second and per detector. Di�erent categories of glitches have di�erent signature in timestreams. Two of the glitch types have a low amplitude component that decays over nearly 1 second. This component produces an excess noise if not properly removed from the time ordered data. We have used a glitch detection and subtraction method based on the joint fit of population templates. The application of this novel glitch removal method removes excess noise from glitches. Using realistic simulations, we find this method does not introduce signal bias.
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    ABSTRACT: The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is the catalogue of sources detected in the first 15 months of Planck operations, the "nominal" mission. It consists of nine single-frequency catalogues of compact sources, both Galactic and extragalactic, detected over the entire sky. The PCCS covers the frequency range 30--857\,GHz with higher sensitivity (it is 90% complete at 180 mJy in the best channel) and better angular resolution (from ~33' to ~5') than previous all-sky surveys in this frequency band. By construction its reliability is >80% and more than 65% of the sources have been detected at least in two contiguous Planck channels. In this paper we present the construction and validation of the PCCS, its contents and its statistical characterization.
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the data processing pipeline of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing centre (DPC) to create and characterize full-sky maps based on the first 15.5 months of operations at 30, 44 and 70 GHz. In particular, we discuss the various steps involved in reducing the data, starting from telemetry packets through to the production of cleaned, calibrated timelines and calibrated frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation induced on the mean temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation by the proper motion of the spacecraft. Sky signals other than the dipole are removed by an iterative procedure based on simultaneous fitting of calibration parameters and sky maps. Noise properties are estimated from time-ordered data after the sky signal has been removed, using a generalized least square map-making algorithm. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated noise. Noise covariance matrices, required to compute statistical uncertainties on LFI and Planck products, are also produced. Main beams are estimated down to the -20 dB level using Jupiter transits, which are also used for the geometrical calibration of the focal plane.
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    ABSTRACT: We present the current estimate of instrumental and systematic effect uncertainties for the Planck-Low Frequency Instrument relevant to the first release of the Planck cosmological results. We give an overview of the main effects and of the tools and methods applied to assess residuals in maps and power spectra. We also present an overall budget of known systematic effect uncertainties, which are dominated sidelobe straylight pick-up and imperfect calibration. However, even these two effects are at least two orders of magnitude weaker than the cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations as measured in terms of the angular temperature power spectrum. A residual signal above the noise level is present in the multipole range $\ell<20$, most notably at 30 GHz, and is likely caused by residual Galactic straylight contamination. Current analysis aims to further reduce the level of spurious signals in the data and to improve the systematic effects modelling, in particular with respect to straylight and calibration uncertainties.
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    ABSTRACT: Based on CMB maps from the 2013 Planck Mission data release, this paper presents the detection of the ISW effect, i.e., the correlation between the CMB and large-scale evolving gravitational potentials. The significance of detection ranges from 2 to 4 sigma, depending on which method is used. We investigate three separate approaches, which cover essentially all previous studies, as well as breaking new ground. (i) Correlation of the CMB with the Planck reconstructed gravitational lensing potential (for the first time). This detection is made using the lensing-induced bispectrum; the correlation between lensing and the ISW effect has a significance close to 2.5 sigma. (ii) Cross-correlation with tracers of LSS, yielding around 3 sigma significance, based on a combination of radio (NVSS) and optical (SDSS) data. (iii) Aperture photometry on stacked CMB fields at the locations of known large-scale structures, which yields a 4 sigma signal when using a previously explored catalogue, but shows strong discrepancies in amplitude and scale compared to expectations. More recent catalogues give more moderate results, ranging from negligible to 2.5 sigma at most, but with a more consistent scale and amplitude, the latter being still slightly above what is expected from numerical simulations within LCMD. Where they can be compared, these measurements are compatible with previous work using data from WMAP, which had already mapped these scales to the limits of cosmic variance. Planck's broader frequency coverage confirms that the signal is achromatic, bolstering the case for ISW detection. As a final step we use tracers of large-scale structure to filter the CMB data, presenting maps of the ISW temperature perturbation. These results provide complementary and independent evidence for the existence of a dark energy component that governs the current accelerated expansion of the Universe.
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    ABSTRACT: We present the first results based on Planck measurements of the CMB temperature and lensing-potential power spectra. The Planck spectra at high multipoles are extremely well described by the standard spatially-flat six-parameter LCDM cosmology. In this model Planck data determine the cosmological parameters to high precision. We find a low value of the Hubble constant, H0=67.3+/-1.2 km/s/Mpc and a high value of the matter density parameter, Omega_m=0.315+/-0.017 (+/-1 sigma errors) in excellent agreement with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) surveys. Including curvature, we find that the Universe is consistent with spatial flatness to percent-level precision using Planck CMB data alone. We present results from an analysis of extensions to the standard cosmology, using astrophysical data sets in addition to Planck and high-resolution CMB data. None of these models are favoured significantly over standard LCDM. The deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity is insensitive to the addition of tensor modes and to changes in the matter content of the Universe. We find a 95% upper limit of r<0.11 on the tensor-to-scalar ratio. There is no evidence for additional neutrino-like relativistic particles. Using BAO and CMB data, we find N_eff=3.30+/-0.27 for the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom, and an upper limit of 0.23 eV for the summed neutrino mass. Our results are in excellent agreement with big bang nucleosynthesis and the standard value of N_eff=3.046. We find no evidence for dynamical dark energy. Despite the success of the standard LCDM model, this cosmology does not provide a good fit to the CMB power spectrum at low multipoles, as noted previously by the WMAP team. While not of decisive significance, this is an anomaly in an otherwise self-consistent analysis of the Planck temperature data.
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (hereafter HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.7 to 4.6 arcmin. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively, 10, 6, 12 and 39 microKelvin in HFI four lowest frequency channel (100--353 GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy/sr for the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Using the 143 GHz channel as a reference, these two high frequency channels are intercalibrated within 5% and the 353 GHz relative calibration is at the percent level. The 100 and 217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 < l <2500), are intercalibrated at better than 0.2 %.
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    ABSTRACT: The Planck nominal mission cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps yield unprecedented constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity (NG). Using three optimal bispectrum estimators, separable template-fitting (KSW), binned, and modal, we obtain consistent values for the primordial local, equilateral, and orthogonal bispectrum amplitudes, quoting as our final result fNL^local= 2.7+/-5.8, fNL^equil= -42+/-75, and fNL^ortho= -25+\-39 (68% CL statistical). NG is detected in the data; using skew-C_l statistics we find a nonzero bispectrum from residual point sources, and the ISW-lensing bispectrum at a level expected in the LambdaCDM scenario. The results are based on comprehensive cross-validation of these estimators on Gaussian and non-Gaussian simulations, are stable across component separation techniques, pass an extensive suite of tests, and are confirmed by skew-C_l, wavelet bispectrum and Minkowski functional estimators. Beyond estimates of individual shape amplitudes, we present model-independent, 3-dimensional reconstructions of the Planck CMB bispectrum and thus derive constraints on early-Universe scenarios that generate primordial NG, including general single-field models of inflation, excited initial states (non-Bunch-Davies vacua), and directionally-dependent vector models. We provide an initial survey of scale-dependent feature and resonance models. These results bound both general single-field and multi-field model parameter ranges, such as the speed of sound, c_s \geq 0.02 (95% CL), in an effective field theory parametrization, and the curvaton decay fraction r_D \geq 0.15 (95% CL). The Planck data significantly limit the viable parameter space of the ekpyrotic/cyclic scenarios. The amplitude of the 4-point function in the local model tauNL < 2800 (95% CL). These constraints represent the highest precision tests to date of physical mechanisms for the origin of cosmic structure.
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the all-sky Planck catalogue of clusters and cluster candidates derived from Sunyaev--Zeldovich (SZ) effect detections using the first 15.5 months of Planck satellite observations. The catalogue contains 1227 entries, making it over six times the size of the Planck Early SZ (ESZ) sample and the largest SZ-selected catalogue to date. It contains 861 confirmed clusters, of which 178 have been confirmed as clusters, mostly through follow-up observations, and a further 683 are previously-known clusters. The remaining 366 have the status of cluster candidates, and we divide them into three classes according to the quality of evidence that they are likely to be true clusters. The Planck SZ catalogue is the deepest all-sky cluster catalogue, with redshifts up to about one, and spans the broadest cluster mass range from (0.1 to 1.6) 10^{15}Msun. Confirmation of cluster candidates through comparison with existing surveys or cluster catalogues is extensively described, as is the statistical characterization of the catalogue in terms of completeness and statistical reliability. The outputs of the validation process are provided as additional information. This gives, in particular, an ensemble of 813 cluster redshifts, and for all these Planck clusters we also include a mass estimated from a newly-proposed SZ-mass proxy. A refined measure of the SZ Compton parameter for the clusters with X-ray counter-parts is provided, as is an X-ray flux for all the Planck clusters not previously detected in X-ray surveys.

Publication Stats

8k Citations
749.08 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2014
    • Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
      • Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1998–2014
    • California Institute of Technology
      • • Department of Physics
      • • Jet Propulsion Laboratory
      • • Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy
      Pasadena, California, United States
  • 2013
    • European Southern Observatory
      Arching, Bavaria, Germany
    • McGill University
      • Department of Physics
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2011
    • NASA
      • Jet Propulsion Laboratory
      Вашингтон, West Virginia, United States
    • University of Colorado at Boulder
      • Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy
      Boulder, Colorado, United States
  • 2006
    • University of Toronto
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2004
    • University of Wales
      Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
  • 2003
    • University of Chicago
      • Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 2002
    • Carnegie Mellon University
      • Department of Physics
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States
  • 2000
    • Institute for Advanced Study
      Princeton Junction, New Jersey, United States
  • 1994–1995
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Physics
      Berkeley, California, United States
  • 1993
    • Nagoya University
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan