Heikki Kyröläinen

National Defence University, Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland

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Publications (126)243.17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of exercise on total leukocyte count and subsets, as well as hormone and cytokine responses in a thermoneutral and cold environment, with and without an individualized pre-cooling protocol inducing low-intensity shivering. Nine healthy young men participated in six experimental trials wearing shorts and t-shirts. Participants exercised for 60 min on a treadmill at low (LOW: 50% of peak VO2) and moderate (MOD: 70% VO2peak) exercise intensities in a climatic chamber set at 22uC (NT), and in 0uC (COLD) with and without a pre-exercise low-intensity shivering protocol (SHIV). Core and skin temperature, heart rate and oxygen consumption were collected continuously. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of exercise to assess endocrine and immunological changes. Core temperature in NT was greater than COLD and SHIV by 0.460.2uC whereas skin temperature in NT was also greater than COLD and SHIV by 8.561.4uC and 9.362.5uC respectively in MOD. Total testosterone, adenocorticotropin and cortisol were greater in NT vs. COLD and SHIV in MOD. Norepinephrine was greater in NT vs. other conditions across intensities. Interleukin-2, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-c, Rantes, Eotaxin, IP-10, MIP-1b, MCP-1, VEGF, PDGF, and G-CSF were elevated in NT vs. COLD and/or SHIV. Furthermore, IFN-c, MIP-1b, MCP-1, IL-10, VEGF, and PDGF demonstrate greater concentrations in SHIV vs. COLD, mainly in the MOD condition. This study demonstrated that exercising in the cold can diminish the exerciseinduced systemic inflammatory response seen in a thermoneutral environment. Nonetheless, prolonged cooling inducing shivering thermogenesis prior to exercise, may induce an immuno-stimulatory response following moderate intensity exercise. Performing exercise in cold environments can be a useful strategy in partially inhibiting the acute systemic inflammatory response from exercise but oppositely, additional body cooling may reverse this benefit.
    PLoS ONE 10/2014; 9(10). · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine acute responses of force production and oxygen uptake to combined strength (S) and endurance running (E) loading sessions in which the order of exercises is reversed (ES vs.
    International journal of sports physiology and performance. 10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim was to study associations of maximal strength and muscular endurance with inflammatory biomarkers independent of cardiorespiratory fitness in those with and without abdominal obesity. 686 young healthy men participated (25±5 years). Maximal strength was measured via isometric testing using dynamo-meters to determine maximal strength index. Muscular endurance index consisted of push-ups, sit-ups and repeated squats. An indirect cycle ergometer test until exhaustion was used to estimate maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). Participants were stratified according to those with (>102 cm) and those without abdominal obesity (<102 cm) based on waist circumference. Inflammatory factors (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha) were analysed from serum samples. Maximal strength and muscular endurance were inversely associated with IL-6 in those with (β=-0.49, -0.39, respectively) (p<0.05) and in those without abdominal obesity (β=-0.08, -0.14, respectively) (p<0.05) adjusted for smoking and cardio-respiratory fitness. After adjusting for smoking and cardiorespiratory fitness, maximal strength and muscular endurance were inversely associated with CRP only in those without abdominal obesity (β=-0.11, -0.26, respectively) (p<0.05). This cross-sectional study demonstrated that muscular fitness is inversely associated with C-reactive protein and IL-6 concentrations in young adult men independent of cardiorespi-ratory fitness.
    International journal of sports medicine. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Cheung, Stephen S, Niina E. Mutanen, Heikki M. Karinen, Anne S. Koponen, Heikki Kyröläinen, Heikki O. Tikkanen, and Juha E. Peltonen. Ventilatory chemosensitivity, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and total hemoglobin mass before and after a 72-day Mt. Everest expedition. High Alt Med Biol. 15:000–000, 2014.—. doi:10.1089/ham.2013.1153. Sept. 11, 2014, epub ahead of print. Background: We investigated the effects of chronic hypobaric hypoxic acclimatization, performed over the course of a 72-day self-supported Everest expedition, on ventilatory chemosensitivity, arterial saturation, and tissue oxygenation adaptation along with total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass) in nine experienced climbers (age 37±6 years, 55±7 mL·kg−1·min−1). Methods: Exercise-hypoxia tolerance was tested using a constant treadmill exercise of 5.5 km·h−1 at 3.8% grade (mimicking exertion at altitude) with 3-min steps of progressive normobaric poikilocapnic hypoxia. Breath-by-breath ventilatory responses, Spo2, and cerebral (frontal cortex) and active muscle (vastus lateralis) oxygenation were measured throughout. Acute hypoxic ventilatory response (AHVR) was determined by linear regression slope of ventilation vs. Spo2. PRE and POST (<15 days) expedition, tHb-mass was measured using carbon monoxide-rebreathing. Results: Post-expedition, exercise-hypoxia tolerance improved (11:32±3:57 to 16:30±2:09 min, p<0.01). AHVR was elevated (1.25±0.33 to 1.63±0.38 L·min−1.%−1 Spo2, p<0.05). Spo2 decreased throughout exercise-hypoxia in both trials, but was preserved at higher values at 4800 m post-expedition. Cerebral oxygenation decreased progressively with increasing exercise-hypoxia in both trials, with a lower level of deoxyhemoglobin POST at 2400, 3500 and 4800 m. Muscle oxygenation also decreased throughout exercise-hypoxia, with similar patterns PRE and POST. No relationship was observed between the slope of AHVR and cerebral or muscle oxygenation either PRE or POST. Absolute tHb-mass response exhibited great individual variation with a nonsignificant 5.4% increasing trend post-expedition (975±154 g PRE and 1025±124 g POST, p=0.17). Conclusions: We conclude that adaptation to chronic hypoxia during a climbing expedition to Mt. Everest will increase hypoxic tolerance, AHVR, and cerebral but not muscle oxygenation, as measured during simulated acute hypoxia at sea level. However, tHb-mass did not increase significantly and improvement in cerebral oxygenation was not associated with the change in AHVR.
    High altitude medicine & biology 09/2014; doi:10.1089/ham.2013.1153.(epub ahead of print). · 1.58 Impact Factor
  • O Kettunen, H Kyröläinen, M Santtila, T Vasankari
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    ABSTRACT: There is limited evidence available regarding the relationship between physical fitness, especially muscular fitness, and the mental well-being among young healthy men. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of measured cardiovascular and muscle fitness and self reported leisure time physical activity (LTPA) on outcomes of stress and mental resources in Finnish young men.
    The Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness. 08/2014; 54(4):545-51.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a four-week weight reduction period (WRP) with high protein and reduced carbohydrate intake on body composition, explosive power, speed, serum hormones and acid-base balance in male track and field jumpers and sprinters. Eight participants were assigned to a high weight reduction group (HWR; energy restriction 750 kcal / day), and seven to a low weight reduction group (LWR; energy restriction 300 kcal / day). Energy and carbohydrate intake decreased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) only in HWR by 740 ± 330 kcal / day and 130 ± 29 g / day, respectively. Furthermore, total body mass and fat mass decreased (p ≤ 0.05) only in HWR by 2.2 ± 1.0 kg and 1.7 ± 1.6 kg, respectively. Fat-free mass (FFM), serum testosterone, cortisol, and SHBG did not change significantly. Caion and pH decreased (p ≤ 0.05) only in HWR (3.1 ± 2.8 % and 0.8 ± 0.8 %, respectively), whereas HCO3- declined (p ≤ 0.05) in both groups by 19.3 ± 6.2 % in HWR and by 13.1 ± 8.5 % in LWR. The counter-movement jump and 20-m sprint time improved consistently (p ≤ 0.05) only in HWR, by 2.6 ± 2.5 cm and 0.04 ± 0.04 s, respectively. Finally, athletes with a fat percentage 10% or over at the baseline were able to preserve FFM. In conclusion, altered acid-base balance but improved weight bearing power performance was observed without negative consequences on serum hormones and FFM after a four-week weight reduction of 0.5 kg / week achieved via reduced carbohydrate but maintained high protein intake.
    Journal of strength and conditioning research / National Strength & Conditioning Association. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dynamic exercise and whole-body cooling independently increase skeletal muscle tissue deoxygenation, yet their combined effects in muscular circulation are unknown. We investigated the effects of a cold environment on skeletal muscle blood volume and deoxygenation in eleven participants at 50% (walking) or 70% (running) of their peak VO2 for 60 min, in 22°C (NT), and 0°C without (CO) and with (PC) a pre-exercise whole-body cooling, which induced an increase in VO2 to 15%VO2peak. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) derived signals for hemoglobin changes were measured continuously with NIRS on the vastus lateralis (VL) and the gastrocnemius (GM) muscles to determine changes in oxygenated (O2Hb), deoxygenated (HHb: indicating deoxygenation) and total (tHb: indicating blood volume) myo/hemoglobin concentrations (ΔµM.L-1). Total Hb was lower in PC (-10.1±5.9 and -8.0±7.1 µM.L-1) compared to NT (-3.9±3.1 and -1.8±4.8 µM.L-1) and CO (-3.9±6.6 and 1.9±6.3 µM.L-1) in walking and running respectively, in the VL but not in GM (p≤0.001). This change in tHb was matched by O2Hb (p≤0.001). No differences between conditions were observed in HHb. In conclusion, pre-exercise whole-body cooling decreased skeletal muscle blood volume which limited oxygenated hemoglobin availability but deoxygenation of the muscle during submaximal exercise was unaffected by the cold.
    Experimental Biology, San Diego; 04/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Exercise and shivering rely on different metabolic pathways and consequently, fuel selection. The present study examined the effects of a pre-exercise low-intensity shivering protocol on fuel selection during submaximal exercise in a cold environment. Nine male subjects exercised 4 times for 60 min at 50% (LOW) or 70% (MOD) of their peak oxygen consumption on a motorized treadmill in a climatic chamber set at 0 °C with (SHIV) and without (CON) a pre-exercise cooling protocol, inducing low-intensity shivering. Thermal, cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses were measured every 15 min whereas blood samples were collected every 30 min to assess serum nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), glycerol, glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Rectal and skin temperatures were lower in the SHIV condition, within LOW and MOD conditions, during the first 45 min of exercise. Norepinephrine (NE) concentration was greater in SHIV vs. CON within LOW (1.39 ± 0.17 vs. 0.98 ± 0.17 ng·mL(-1)) and MOD (1.50 ± 0.20 vs. 1.01 ± 0.09 ng·mL(-1)), whereas NEFA, glycerol and BHB were greater in SHIV vs. CON (1060 ± 49 vs. 898 ± 78 μmol·L(-1); 0.27 ± 0.02 vs. 0.22 ± 0.03 mmol·L(-1); 0.39 ± 0.06 vs. 0.27 ± 0.04 mmol·L(-1), respectively) within MOD only. No changes were observed in fat or carbohydrate oxidation between SHIV and CON during exercise. Despite increases in NE, NEFA, glycerol and BHB from pre-exercise low-intensity shivering, fuel selection during short-term submaximal exercise in the cold was unaltered.
    Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 03/2014; 39(3):282-291. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract The study examined the acute neuromuscular and metabolic responses and recovery (24 and 48 h) to combined strength and endurance sessions (SEs). Recreationally endurance trained men (n = 12) and women (n = 10) performed: endurance running followed immediately by a strength loading (combined endurance and strength session (ES)) and the reverse order (SE). Maximal strength (MVC), countermovement jump height (CMJ), and creatine kinase activity were measured pre-, mid-, post-loading and at 24 and 48 h of recovery. MVC and CMJ were decreased (P < 0.05) at post-ES and SE sessions in men. Only MVC decreased in ES and SE women (P < 0.05). During recovery, no order differences in MVC were observed between sessions in men, but MVC and CMJ remained decreased. During recovery in women, a delayed decrease in CMJ was observed in ES but not in SE (P < 0.01), while MVC returned to baseline at 24 h. Creatine kinase increased (P < 0.05) during both ES and SE and peaked in all groups at 24 h. The present combined ES and SE sessions induced greater neuromuscular fatigue at post in men than in women. The delayed fatigue response in ES women may be an order effect related to muscle damage.
    Journal of Sports Sciences 02/2014; · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Typical military tasks include load carriage, digging, and lifting loads. To avoid accumulation of fatigue, it is important to know the energy expenditure of soldiers during such tasks. The purpose of this study was to measure cardiorespiratory responses during military tasks in field conditions. Unloaded (M1) and loaded (M2) marching, artillery field preparation (AFP), and digging of defensive positions (D) were monitored. 15 conscripts carried additional weight of military outfit (5.4 kg) during M1, AFP, and D and during M2 full combat gear (24.4 kg). Absolute and relative oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) of M1 (n = 8) were 1.5 ± 0.1 L min(-1), 19.9 ± 2.7 mL kg(-1) min(-1) (42 ± 7% VO2max), and 107 ± 8 beats min(-1) (55 ± 3% HRmax), respectively. VO2 of M2 (n = 8) was 1.7 ± 0.2 L min(-1), 22.7 ± 3.4 mL kg(-1) min(-1) (47 ± 6% VO2max) and HR 123 ± 9 beats min(-1) (64 ± 4% HRmax). VO2 of AFP (n = 5) and D (n = 6) were 1.3 ± 0.3 L min(-1), 18.0 ± 3.0 (37 ± 6% VO2max), and 1.8 ± 0.4 L min(-1), 24.3 ± 5.1 mL kg(-1) min(-1) (51 ± 9% VO2max), respectively. Corresponding HR values were 99 ± 8 beats min(-1) (50 ± 3% HRmax) and 132 ± 10 beats min(-1) (68 ± 4% HRmax), respectively. The mean work intensity of soldiers was close to 50% of their maximal aerobic capacity, which has been suggested to be maximal limit of intensity for sustained work.
    Military medicine. 02/2014; 179(2):218-24.
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    ABSTRACT: Full text: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/6WNS9HjT5iaSAFY6hDXs/full Participating in competitive sport increases the risk for injuries and musculoskeletal pain among adolescent athletes. There is also evidence that the use of prescription drugs has increased among sport club athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of painkillers among young male ice hockey players (IHP) in comparison to schoolboys (controls) and its relation to the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and problems during activities and sleeping. Information was gathered through a questionnaire, completed by 121 IHP and compared to the responses of 618 age-matched controls. Results showed that monthly existing pain was at 82% for IHP, and 72% for controls, though IHP had statistically more musculoskeletal pain in their lower limbs (56% versus 44%), lower back (54% versus 35%), and buttocks (26% versus 11%). There were no group differences in the neck, upper back, upper limb, or chest areas. The disability index was statistically similar for both groups, as musculoskeletal pain causing difficulties in daily activities and sleeping was reported by a minority of subjects. Despite this similarity, IHP used more painkillers than controls (18% versus 10%). Further nuanced research is encouraged to compare athletes and non-athletes in relation to painkillers.
    Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine. 01/2014; 2(1):448-454.
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    ABSTRACT: Participating in competitive sport increases the risk for injuries and musculoskeletal pain among adolescent athletes. There is also evidence that the use of prescription drugs has increased among sport club athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of painkillers among young male ice hockey players (IHP) in comparison to schoolboys (controls) and its relation to the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and problems during activities and sleeping. Information was gathered through a questionnaire, completed by 121 IHP and compared to the responses of 618 age-matched controls. Results showed that monthly existing pain was at 82% for IHP, and 72% for controls, though IHP had statistically more musculoskeletal pain in their lower limbs (56% versus 44%), lower back (54% versus 35%), and buttocks (26% versus 11%). There were no group differences in the neck, upper back, upper limb, or chest areas. The disability index was statistically similar for both groups, as musculoskeletal pain causing difficulties in daily activities and sleeping was reported by a minority of subjects. Despite this similarity, IHP used more painkillers than controls (18% versus 10%). Further nuanced research is encouraged to compare athletes and non-athletes in relation to painkillers.
    Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim was to study the relationships between different domains of physical activity and cardiovascular risk factors and physical fitness. 781 young men participated. Self-reported leisure-time (LTPA), commuting (CPA) and occupational (OPA) activity were determined. Blood pressure, s-HDL-cholesterol, s-triglyserides and s-LDL-cholesterol and glucose were measured. The continuous CVD risk factor score was calculated from the z-score mean of each cardiovascular risk factor. The cutpoint was defined as 1 standard deviation above the mean. Cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness were measured. The likelihood of CVD risk factor score was higher in moderate [OR 1.99 (95 % CI 1.21-3.28)] and low [1.87 (1.16-3.02)] CPA groups compared to the high group, whereas neither low nor moderate LTPA or OPA groups showed similar associations after adjustments. Low OPA combined either with low LTPA [2.01 (1.08-3.74)] or low CPA [1.90 (1.05-3.44)] had a higher likelihood for CVD risk factor compared to combined moderate-high categories after adjustments. LTPA was positively associated with all physical fitness parameters, CPA with cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular endurance, and OPA with grip strength. The results emphasize the beneficial role of CPA regarding CVD risk factor score and stress the avoidance of low physical activity in its different domains.
    Journal of Physical Activity and Health 12/2013; · 1.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim was to study the associations of maximal strength and muscular endurance with single and clustered cardiovascular risk factors. Muscular endurance, maximal strength, cardiorespiratory fitness and waist circumference were measured in 686 young men (25±5 years). Cardiovascular risk factors (plasma glucose, serum high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure) were determined. The risk factors were transformed to z-scores and the mean of values formed clustered cardiovascular risk factor. Muscular endurance was inversely associated with triglycerides, s-LDL-cholesterol, glucose and blood pressure (β=-0.09 to - 0.23, p<0.05), and positively with s-HDL cholesterol (β=0.17, p<0.001) independent of cardiorespiratory fitness. Muscular endurance was negatively associated with the clustered cardiovascular risk factor independent of cardiorespiratory fitness (β=-0.26, p<0.05), whereas maximal strength was not associated with any of the cardiovascular risk factors or the clustered cardiovascular risk factor independent of cardiorespiratory fitness. Furthermore, cardiorespiratory fitness was inversely associated with triglycerides, s-LDL-cholesterol and the clustered cardiovascular risk factor (β=-0.14 to - 0.24, p<0.005), as well as positively with s-HDL cholesterol (β=0.11, p<0.05) independent of muscular fitness. This cross-sectional study demonstrated that in young men muscular endurance and cardiorespiratory fitness were independently associated with the clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, whereas maximal strength was not.
    International Journal of Sports Medicine 09/2013; · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: We hypothesized that lower androgen status together with poor physical fitness associates with atherogenic lipid profile and oxidative stress. Methods: Volunteered young men (n=846, mean age 25.1 ± 4.6 years) were categorized into unfit, average fit, and fit groups according to tertiles of maximal oxygen uptake, series of muscle endurance tests, and maximal upper and lower body strength. Furthermore, concentrations of serum testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were determined in order to divide participants into lower and higher testosterone (loTT, hiTT) and free testosterone (loFT, hiFT) subgroups, using medians as cut-off points. The participants were divided into subgroups according to fitness x testosterone (unfit/average fit/fit x low/high TT/FT), and the concentrations of serum lipids and ox-LDL were measured. Results: The loTT / unfit cardiorespiratory subgroup had 29% higher concentration of ox-LDL compared to the loTT / fit cardiorespiratory subgroup (P=0.044). The loTT / unfit cardiorespiratory subgroup had a significantly higher ratio of ox-LDL/HDL-cholesterol compared to the other five TT subgroups (P<0.05, in all). While ox-LDL showed a gradual form of decrease from unfit to fit in loTT cardiorespiratory subgroups, no differences were seen in muscular fitness or maximal strength (upper and lower body) subgroups.Conclusions: Young men with poor cardiorespiratory fitness together with lower levels of TT have higher concentrations of ox-LDL. Good cardiorespiratory fitness combined with lower androgen levels is not related to atherogenic lipid profile. The combination of poor muscular fitness or maximal muscle strength and lower TT levels does not cause atherogenic lipid profile.
    International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism 07/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Cold exposure modulates the use of carbohydrates (CHOs) and fat during exercise. This phenomenon has mostly been observed in controlled cycling studies, but not during walking and running when core temperature and oxygen consumption are controlled, as both may alter energy metabolism. This study aimed at examining energy substrate availability and utilization during walking and running in the cold when core temperature and oxygen consumption are maintained. Ten lightly clothed male subjects walked or ran for 60-min, at 50% and 70% of maximal oxygen consumption, respectively, in a climatic chamber set at 0 • C or 22 • C. Thermal, cardiovascular, and oxidative responses were measured every 15-min during exercise. Blood samples for serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), glycerol, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), plasma catecholamines, and serum lipids were collected immediately prior, and at 30-and 60-min of exercise. Skin temperature strongly decreased while core temperature did not change during cold trials. Heart rate (HR) was also lower in cold trials. A rise in fat utilization in the cold was seen through lower respiratory quotient (RQ) (−0.03 ± 0.02), greater fat oxidation (+0.14 ± 0.13 g · min −1) and contribution of fat to total energy expenditure (+1 1 .62 ± 1.99 kcal · min −). No differences from cold exposure were observed in blood parameters. During submaximal walking and running, a greater reliance on derived fat sources occurs in the cold, despite the absence of concurrent alterations in NEFAs, glycerol, or catecholamine concentrations. This disparity may suggest a greater reliance on intra-muscular energy sources such as triglycerides during both walking and running.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), systemic inflammation, and poor cardiorespiratory fitness. We examined affiliations of these factors and the effect of muscular fitness on MetS in young healthy men. METHODS: Physical fitness, ox-LDL, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and serum lipids were measured in a nationally representative sample of Finnish young men with and without MetS. Participants (mean age 25.1years) performed tests of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and muscle fitness, and were divided into MetS (n=54, IDF 2007 criteria) and non-MetS (n=790). Age, smoking and leisure-time physical activity were used as covariates (ANCOVA). RESULTS: The MetS group had lower results in VO2max and all of the muscular fitness tests (excluding grip strength) (P<0.0001, in all). Ox-LDL, ox-LDL/HDL-cholesterol, ox-LDL/LDL-cholesterol, TNFα and IL-6 were all higher in the MetS group than in the non-MetS group (P<0.01, in all). In stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis (adjusted to MetS criteria), higher ox-LDL (OR 1.118, 95% CI 1.078-1.160), lower VO2max (OR 0.938, 95% CI 0.901-0.977) and lower sit-ups (OR 0.898, 95% CI 0.844-0.956) predicted MetS (p<0.05, in all). CONCLUSIONS: Young men with MetS possess significantly poorer cardiorespiratory and muscle fitness, together with elevated systemic levels of ox-LDL, TNFα and IL-6 compared to non-MetS young men. Of these variables, ox-LDL, VO2max and sit-ups predicted MetS. Based on these findings, poor physical fitness and elevated concentration of ox-LDL are significant predisposing factors in the development of MetS.
    Metabolism: clinical and experimental 03/2013; · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regional differences in glucose and fatty acid uptake within skeletal muscle during exercise. Blood flow (BF), glucose uptake (GU) and free fatty acid uptake (FFAU) were measured in four different regions (vastus lateralis, VL; rectus femoris, RF; vastus intermedius, VI; and vastus medialis, VM) of the quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle during low-intensity, knee-extension exercise using positron emission tomography. BF was higher in VI than in VL, RF and VM (P < 0.05). FFAU was higher in VI (P < 0.001) but also in VM (P < 0.05) compared with VL and RF. In contrast, GU was higher in RF compared with VL (P < 0.05) but was not significantly different to VM or VI (both P = NS). FFAU within these four muscle regions correlated significantly with BF (r = 0.951, P < 0.05), whereas no significant relationship was observed between GU and BF (r = 0.352, P = NS). Therefore, skeletal muscle FFAU, but not GU, appears to be associated with BF during low-intensity exercise. The present results also indicate considerable regional differences in substrate use within working QF muscle. As such, an important methodological outcome from these results is that one sample from a specific part of the QF muscle does not represent the response in the entire QF muscle group.
    Arbeitsphysiologie 02/2013; · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Predicted maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) measurements are based on the assumption of linear relationship between heart rate or power output and oxygen consumption during various intensities. To develop more reliable predicted test for soldiers, the purpose of the present study was to compare the results of direct measurements of VO2max to respective predicted values in cycling (military fitness test). The predicted mean (+/- SD) peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) value was 45.2 +/- 7.7 mL kg(-1) min(-1) during first week, whereas the respective direct value was 44.8 +/- 8.5 mL kg(-1) min(-1). During the ninth week, the predicted and measured mean (+/-SD) VO2max values were 47.4 +/- 6.7 mL kg(-1) min(-1) and 48.7 +/- 7.3 mL kg(-1) min(-1), respectively. The absolute differences between the methods were -0.42 mL kg(-1) min(-1) (p = 0.46) and 1.28 mL kg(-1) min(-1) (p < 0.05), which correspond to relative values of 0.9% and 2.7%, respectively. A Bland-Altman plot of measured VO2max and predicted VO2max showed no significant trend between the mean and the difference of the 2 methods either before (r = 0.14, p = 0.24) or after the basic military training period (r = 0.11, p = 0.36). Intraclass correlation coefficient varied between r = 0.82 to 0.94. In conclusion, the predicted protocol is fairly accurate (+/-3%) and reliable to predict VO2max values in male soldiers but the use for clinical purposes should be considered individually.
    Military medicine 02/2013; 178(2):234-8. · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cold exposure modulates the use of carbohydrates (CHOs) and fat during exercise. This phenomenon has mostly been observed in controlled cycling studies, but not during walking and running when core temperature and oxygen consumption are controlled, as both may alter energy metabolism. This study aimed at examining energy substrate availability and utilization during walking and running in the cold when core temperature and oxygen consumption are maintained. Ten lightly clothed male subjects walked or ran for 60-min, at 50% and 70% of maximal oxygen consumption, respectively, in a climatic chamber set at 0°C or 22°C. Thermal, cardiovascular, and oxidative responses were measured every 15-min during exercise. Blood samples for serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), glycerol, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), plasma catecholamines, and serum lipids were collected immediately prior, and at 30- and 60-min of exercise. Skin temperature strongly decreased while core temperature did not change during cold trials. Heart rate (HR) was also lower in cold trials. A rise in fat utilization in the cold was seen through lower respiratory quotient (RQ) (-0.03 ± 0.02), greater fat oxidation (+0.14 ± 0.13 g · min(-1)) and contribution of fat to total energy expenditure (+1.62 ± 1.99 kcal · min(-1)). No differences from cold exposure were observed in blood parameters. During submaximal walking and running, a greater reliance on derived fat sources occurs in the cold, despite the absence of concurrent alterations in NEFAs, glycerol, or catecholamine concentrations. This disparity may suggest a greater reliance on intra-muscular energy sources such as triglycerides during both walking and running.
    Frontiers in Physiology 01/2013; 4:99.

Publication Stats

2k Citations
243.17 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • National Defence University
      Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
    • University of Kuopio
      • Institute of Biomedicine, Physiology
      Kuopio, Eastern Finland Province, Finland
    • LIKES - Foundation for Sport and Health Sciences
      Jyväskylä, Province of Western Finland, Finland
  • 1990–2014
    • University of Jyväskylä
      • Department of Biology of Physical Activity
      Jyväskylä, Province of Western Finland, Finland
  • 2003–2013
    • University of Turku
      • • Department of Physiology
      • • Paavo Nurmi Center
      • • Turku PET Centre
      • • Turku PET (Positron Emission Tomography) Centre
      Turku, Province of Western Finland, Finland
  • 2010–2012
    • University of Eastern Finland
      • Institute of Biomedicine
      Kuopio, Province of Eastern Finland, Finland
  • 2004
    • Université Jean Monnet
      • Faculté de Médecine
      Saint-Étienne, Rhone-Alpes, France
  • 1996–2002
    • Toyama University
      Тояма, Toyama, Japan