G. Schreiber

German Aerospace Center (DLR), Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

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Publications (26)13.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Transforming research results into marketable products requires considerable endurance and a strong sense of entrepreneurship. The KUKA Lightweight Robot (LWR) is the latest outcome of a bilateral research collaboration between KUKA Roboter, Augsburg, and the Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Wessling. The LWR has unique characteristics including a low mass-payload ratio and a programmable, active compliance which enables researchers and engineers to develop new industrial and service robotics applications with unprecedented performance, making it a unique reference platform for robotics research and future manufacturing. The stages of product genesis, the most innovative features and first application examples are presented.
    ISR/ROBOTIK 2010, Proceedings for the joint conference of ISR 2010 (41st Internationel Symposium on Robotics) und ROBOTIK 2010 (6th German Conference on Robotics), 7-9 June 2010, Munich, Germany - Parallel to AUTOMATICA; 01/2010
  • Automatisierungstechnik. 01/2010; 58:670-680.
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    ABSTRACT: The paper addresses the fusion of vision and force-torque information for robotic assembly tasks. The torque-controlled DLR light-weight robot is used, which is specially designed for fast and safe interaction with a changing environment. The image processing is based on standard hardware components and uses color segmentation and affine invariant feature classification. It provides a position estimation within the region of attraction (ROA) of a compliance based assembly strategy. The assembly planning toolbox is based on a theoretical analysis and the maximization of the ROA. This guarantees the local convergence of the assembly process under consideration of the part geometry. The convergence analysis uses the passivity properties of the robot and the environment. The method is validated through extensive experiments
    Multisensor Fusion and Integration for Intelligent Systems, 2006 IEEE International Conference on; 10/2006
  • CARS 2006 Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery, 20th International Congress and Exhibition; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we present a system for catching a flying ball with a robot arm using o#-the-shelf components (PC based system) for visual tracking. The ball is observed by a large baseline stereo camera, comparing each image to a slowly adapting reference image. We track and predict the target position using an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), also taking into account the air drag. The calibration is achieved by simply performing a few throws and observing their trajectories, as well as moving the robot to some predefined positions. The robustness of the system was demonstrated at the Hannover Fair 2000.
    10/2004;
  • Günter Schreiber, Christian Ott, Gerd Hirzinger
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    ABSTRACT: In the growing field of service robotics the interaction between humans and robots will be of significant importance. Special focus will be on touch as a means of interaction between humans and robots. In this paper the interactive features of the kinematic redundant DLR lightweight robot are presented. At the example of an inverted pendulum the interactive nullspace motion is introduced, where the user is able to modify the configuration as a subtask while balancing the pendulum as primary task. Different ways of nullspace interaction are shown, either contact-free by a teach-device or a position tracker. Special focus will be on touching the robot, whereas the joint torque sensors measure the external touch.
    Advances In Human Robot Interaction, Edited by null Prassler, E.; Lawitzky, G.; Stopp, A.; Grunwald, G.; Hägele, M.; Dillmann, R.; Iossifidis, I., 07/2004: pages 3383-3385; Springer Verlag.
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    ABSTRACT: The paper outlines the long-term space robotics projects as well as recent results in DLR's robotics laboratory. The driving force behind all the efforts made in hardware and software development is to design highly integrated robot systems which can be utilized in space, especially for extravehicular activities. Our envisaged field of application reaches from servicing satellites in low Earth and geostationary orbit to space stations as well as planetary exploration robots, all of them fully ground controlled from Earth. The ground control concept is based on the MARCO architecture, which was verified in a few space robotics projects over recent years. It includes taskoriented programming capabilities for autonomous robot control at the remote site as well as methods for direct telemanipulation by means of virtual reality and telepresence techniques, which allows a realistic feeling for the ground operator via visual and haptic feedback devices. In addition to the control techniques, a new generation of ultra-lightweight robot arms with articulated hands is required to give the space robot systems the necessary dexterity. A number of experiments will verify and consolidate the usage of space robots. First, the ROKVISS experiment aims at the verification of DLR's lightweight robotics components under realistic mission conditions. Second, the TECSAS experiment will show the feasibility of autonomous as well as telepresence methods for further satellite servicing tasks. Third, a strong cooperation with industry will create the first business case in on-orbit-servicing: by attaching a tugboat to a satellite, whose propellant is declining, the lifetime of valuable telecommunication satellites could be prolonged for several years.
    Advanced Robotics, Edited by null RSJ The International Journal of the Robotics Society of Japan, 01/2004; VSP, Netherlands., ISBN: ISSN 0169-1864
  • 9th International Symposium on Advances in Robot Kinematics(ARK), Sestri Levante, Italy, June 28 - July 1, 2004; 01/2004
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    ABSTRACT: In the field of service robotics, whole arm contact with an unstructured environment or human beings becomes a major issue. Therefore soft robots, which mean robots with passively (or mechanically) compliant joints, become more and more important. In this work we analyze what Cartesian stiffness at the tool center point one can achieve with a passively compliant, redundant robot with variable joint stiffness. We restrict this work to the special case of uncoupled joint stiffness only, as coupling of joint stiffness seems to be mechanically difficult to realize. Finally we discuss a Cartesian controller, which incorporates the compliance of the joints and ensures the correct stiffness behavior also for high displacements from the desired position.
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2004. (IROS 2004). Proceedings. 2004 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 01/2004
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    ABSTRACT: The mobile service robots will share their workspaces e.g. offices, hospitals or households with humans. Thus a direct contact between man and machine is inevitably. Robots equipped with appropriate sensors can sense the touch. In this paper we present how an untrained user can intuitively communicate with a DLR light-weight robot just by touching the arm. The robot with 7 dofs will react by an evasiveness motion of the touched links while remaining the orientation of the TCP. This feature will also be used for programming the robot. Programming by Touch is very intuitive as you take the robot at hand and demonstrate the robot-task.
    Advances In Human Robot Interaction, Edited by G. Grunwald, null Prassler, E.; Lawitzky, G.; Stopp, A.; Grunwald, G.; Hägele, M.; Dillmann, R.; Iossifidis, I., 01/2004; Springer Verlag., ISBN: 3-540-23211-7
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    ABSTRACT: Mobile service robots will share their workspaces, e.g., offices, hospitals, or households, with humans. Thus, a direct contact between man and machine is inevitable. Robots equipped with appropriate sensors can sense the touch. In this paper, we present how an unskilled user can intuitively teach the lightweight robot at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Weßling, Germany, just by touching the arm. Programming by "touch" is very intuitive as you take the robot by the hand and demonstrate the movements. This feature can also be used to interact with the service robot while executing a task. Therefore, if our seven-degrees-of-freedom robot arm senses a touch, it will react by an evasive motion of the touched links while keeping the orientation of the tool center point.
    IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics 09/2003; · 6.50 Impact Factor
  • IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics 01/2003; 50(2003-4):659-666. · 6.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mobile service robots will share their workspaces e.g. offices, hospitals or households with humans. Thus a direct contact between man and machine is inevitably. Robots equipped with appropriate sensors can sense the touch. In this paper we present how an untrained user can intuitively interact with the new DLR light-weight robot just by touching the arm. The robot with 7 dof's will react by an evasiveness motion of the touched links while remaining the orientation of the TCP. This feature can also be used for programming the robot. Programming by "touch" is very intuitive as you take the robot at hand and demonstrate the movements.
    09/2001;
  • Source
    G. Schreiber, C. Ott, G. Hirzinger
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the growing field of service robotics the interaction between humans and robots is an important topic. In this paper the interactive features of the kinematically redundant DLR lightweight robot axe presented. At the example of an inverted pendulum the "interactive nullspace motion" is introduced, where the user is able to modify the configuration as a subtask while balancing the pendulum as primary task. Different ways of nullspace interaction are shown, either contact-free by a teach-device or a position tracker, or by touching the robot, whereas the joint torque sensors measure the external touch
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2001. Proceedings. 2001 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 02/2001
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a system for catching a flying ball with a robot arm using off-the-shelf components (PC based system) for visual tracking. The ball is observed by a large baseline stereo camera, comparing each image to a slowly adapting reference image. We track and predict the target position using an extended Kalman filter, also taking into account the air drag. The calibration is achieved by simply performing a few throws and observing their trajectories, as well as moving the robot to some predefined positions
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2001. Proceedings. 2001 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 02/2001
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the overall control structure of a new generation of compliance controlled manipulators implemented by the design and control of the DLR lightweight robot. To achieve the compliance property, the manipulator does not have to revert to a human-like, bionic design. A serial link manipulator, control technology, and sensorized joint actuators can generate a kinesthesis similar to the compliance properties of the human arm. The design and control of the new robot generation implement these properties in a very different way than its biological counterpart to enable high fidelity interaction of the robot with its environment.
    Robotics Research, The Tenth International Symposium, ISRR 2001, Lorne, Victoria, Australia, November 9-12 2001; 01/2001
  • 10th IEEE International Workshop on Robot Human Communication, Bordeaux-Paris, Sept. 18-21, 2001; 01/2001
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    i-SAIRAS 2001, 6th International Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics & Automation in Space, St-Hubert, Quebec, Canada, June 18-22,2001; 01/2001
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    ETS VII Symposium, Tokyo, Japan, 14.03.2000; 01/2000
  • C. Ott, G. Schreiber
    01/2000;