Francisco Cardoso

Federal University of Minas Gerais, Cidade de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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Publications (119)296.06 Total impact

  • Francisco Cardoso
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    ABSTRACT: Chorea is a movement disorder that results from the continuous and random flow of muscle contractions leading to a dance-like appearance. The aims of this article are to define chorea, discuss its underlying causes, and provide a video demonstration of a seven-step guide on how to examine a patient with this movement disorder. This guide helps the clinician to determine the clinical features, severity, and etiology of chorea.
    Movement Disorders Clinical Practice. 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Several genes have been mapped in families or in sporadic cases of dystonia. TOR1-A (DYT1) gene was linked to isolated dystonia. Objective To associate clinical information of patients with dystonia with the TOR1-A gene mutations. Method Eighty-eight patients with dystonia in cervical area (focal, segmental, multifocal and generalized) were recruited at Movement Disorders Clinic of Hospital de Clínicas of the Federal University of Paraná between June of 2008 and June of 2009. They were submitted to the clinical evaluation. DNA was extract from blood and submitted at analysis to TOR1-A mutations by PCR according standard protocols. Results Two patients had c.907GAGdel mutation on TOR1-A gene. These patients, with familial history of dystonia, started his symptoms by legs and had secondary generalization. Conclusion We can suggest that analysis for TOR1-A mutations should be performed only in patients with early onset, generalized and familial dystonia.
    Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria. 10/2014; 72(10):753-6.
  • Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive, Paulo Caramelli, Francisco Eduardo Costa Cardoso
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    ABSTRACT: The authors present a historical review of the neurological diseases related to the famous moviemaker Federico Fellini. There is an account of diseases depicted on his movies as well as his ischemic stroke and consequent neurological deficit - left spatial neglect.
    Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria. 09/2014; 72(9):735-737.
  • Thiago Cardoso Vale, Paulo Caramelli, Francisco Cardoso
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the clinical and radiological features of vascular parkinsonism (VP) and Parkinson's disease (PD).
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Phacomatosis pigmentokeratotica is characterized by the coexistence of nevus sebaceus, papular nevus spilus and associated neurologic abnormalities. We report a case of phacomatosis pigmentokeratotica in a 28-year-old male who presented with palmar-plantar dysesthesia and ipsilateral brain hemiatrophy. As a characteristic neuroimaging finding of the disorder, we found multiple hypointense lesions involving the ipsilateral hemisphere.
    Journal of Dermatological Case Reports 06/2014; 8(2):58-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Marcel Proust was one of the greatest French writers of all times. Since early in his life, Proust was interested in arts and particularly literature. He also demonstrated a great knowledge of medicine, particularly neurology. His father was a doctor, and contributed to neurology through studies on aphasia, stroke, hysteria, and neurasthenia. During his childhood, Proust had the first asthma attack, initially considered a manifestation of neurasthenia. Regarding his illness, Proust was in touch with several renowned neurologists, such as Brissaud, Babinski and Sollier, and other disciples of Charcot. Proust spent the last three years of his life mostly confined to his bedroom since his health had badly deteriorated. In one moment, Babinski was called, examined Proust and after leaving his bedroom, announced to his brother that Proust was practically dead. Few hours later, Proust developed vomica and died.
    Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria 06/2014; 72(6):469-470. · 0.83 Impact Factor
  • Hélio A G Teive, Renato P Munhoz, Francisco Cardoso
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    ABSTRACT: Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    European Neurology 03/2014; 71(5-6):296-298. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    Neurological Sciences 02/2014; · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sydenham's chorea, a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, is characterized by chorea, behavioral changes, and cognitive dysfunction. Perfusion changes in the basal ganglia are the most frequent imaging findings observed in patients with Sydenham's chorea. Twelve adult women with Sydenham's chorea in remission underwent brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Their scans underwent a quantification process to evaluate the perfusion of Brodmann's areas of the frontal lobes and basal ganglia. The results were compared with the findings from a control group that was matched by age. A pattern of hyperperfusion in the left putamen was observed in the patient group (P = 0.02). No significant difference was observed in relation to other brain regions. The findings of brain SPECT suggest that perfusion abnormalities of the basal ganglia may persist even after the remission of abnormal movements in patients with Sydenham's chorea. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
    Movement Disorders 02/2014; 29(2):256-8. · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cervical dystonia (CD) affects the musculature of the neck in a focal way or associated to other parts of the body. The aim of this study was to identify clinical differences between patients with dystonia patients without family history and with family history (sporadic). Eighty-eight patients with CD were recruited in a Movement Disorders Clinic between June of 2008 and June of 2009. Only patients with no etiological diagnosis were accepted for analysis. The age of onset of symptoms was later in patients with focal and segmental dystonia than in patients with generalized dystonia (p<0.001). The severity of symptoms was higher in patients with sporadic dystonia than in familial patients (p<0.01). Generalized cases were more severe in patients with a family history (p<0.01). Sporadic patients had higher levels of pain than familial cases (p<0.05). We expect soon to present the results of genetic analyzes of these patients.
    Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria 02/2014; 72(2):107-13. · 0.55 Impact Factor
  • Francisco Cardoso
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this article is to review movement disorders in children. They are common but have etiology and phenomenology different than in adults. Tics are the most common phenomena although in most instances they are mild and have a favorable long-term prognosis. Dystonia is the second most common phenomena but when present it is usually genetic or idiopathic and causes meaningful disability. Sydenham's chorea is the most common cause of chorea in children worldwide. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a much rarer cause of chorea but it is always to be ruled out given the lack of a specific diagnostic marker for Sydenham's chorea. Tremor, usually caused by drugs or essential tremor, is regarded as rather uncommon in children. Arguably, most pediatric patients with tremor do not seek medical attention because of the lack of disability. Stereotypies are relatively uncommon but their recognition is clinically relevant since they are usually associated with severe conditions such as autism and Rett syndrome. Parkinsonism is quite rare in children and either results from encephalitis or is a side effect of medications. Wilson's disease must be ruled out in all children with movement disorders.
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 01/2014; 20S1:S13-S16. · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several genes associated with dystonia have been identified. A mutation in one of these, THAP1 (DYT6), is linked to isolated dystonia. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of THAP1 gene mutations and the clinical characteristics of patients with these mutations in a clinical population in Brazil. Seventy-four patients presenting with dystonia involving the cervical muscles and without mutations in the TOR1A (DYT1) gene or any other movement disorders were recruited at a movement disorders clinic between June 2008 and June 2009. All the patients underwent clinical examination and were screened for mutations of the THAP1 gene. Three patients had the novel p.Gln97Ter THAP1 nonsense mutation in heterozygosis. One of them had no family history of dystonia. Symptoms in this patient first appeared in his right arm, and the condition progressed to the generalized form. The other two patients belonged to the same family (cousins). Symptoms in the first patient started in her right arm at the age of 18 years and the condition progressed to the segmental form. The second patient, who carried the p.Arg169Gln missense mutation, developed dystonia in her left arm at the age of 6 years. The condition progressed to generalized dystonia. We conclude that THAP1 mutations are also a cause, albeit uncommon, of segmental and generalized dystonia in the Brazilian population.
    Tremor and other hyperkinetic movements (New York, N.Y.). 01/2014; 4:226.
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    ABSTRACT: We report the case of a 38-year-old woman with AIDS who developed opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome during a period different from other cases reported in literature. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome had already been reported as the initial neurological presentation of AIDS, as well as at the time of HIV-seroconversion and immune reconstitution syndrome. Our case is unique since the patient had an elevated CD4 count and negative viral load in the period when the opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome occurred.
    Einstein (Sao Paulo, Brazil). 12/2013; 11(4):533-534.
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    ABSTRACT: Sydenham's chorea (SC) has been associated with increased frequency of psychiatric disorders. The objective of the present study was to determine whether there is any difference in the frequency of psychiatric disorders between SC patients in remission and patients with persistent chorea. Fifty consecutive patients with SC (mean age ± SD, years; 21.5 ± 6.7; M/F; 10/40) were subjected to a comprehensive and structured psychiatric evaluation. The most frequent psychiatric disorders observed in SC patients were: major depression (14%); generalized anxiety disorder (16%), social phobia (24%) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (24%). The frequency of psychiatric disorders did not differ between SC patients in remission in comparison with patients with persistent chorea, except for depressive disorders which were more frequent in the later CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric disorders are common among young adults with SC regardless of the status of motor symptoms.
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 11/2013; · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Research is scarce regarding the use of prosodic parameters in the expression of attitudes in Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the parameters used in prosodic expression of attitudes in individuals with idiopathic PD and the effect of levodopa on these parameters. Method We studied the use of levodopa in 10 individuals with idiopathic PD during the "off" and "on" periods, and 10 individuals without neurological abnormalities. Results PD patients showed lower frequency measurements and longer duration measurements. The levodopa caused reduction in the duration parameter. Conclusion PD patients use prosody to express their attitudes in the same way as controls in both off and on periods. However, when attitudes are not taken into account, levodopa is effective in improving the duration parameter.
    Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria 11/2013; 71(11):835-40. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    Thiago Cardoso Vale, Paulo Caramelli, Francisco Cardoso
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To report the clinical and neuroimaging findings in a case series of vascular parkinsonism (VP). Methods Seventeen patients with VP were evaluated with motor, cognitive, and neuroimaging standardized tests and scales. Results All patients had arterial hypertension. Ten patients were male and the mean age of the whole sample was 75.8±10.1 years. The mean age of parkinsonism onset was 72.2±10.0 years. Common clinical features were urinary incontinence (88.2%), lower limb parkinsonism with freezing of gait and falls (82.3%), and pyramidal signs (76.4%). The mean Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and Hoehn-Yahr scores were 72.5±21.6 points and 3.3±0.9 points, respectively. Sixteen (94.1%) patients had freezing of gait and executive dysfunction. Twelve (70.5%) patients had probable vascular dementia. The mean dose of levodopa was 530.9 mg/day. Unresponsiveness to the drug was confirmed by a 6.9 mean point reduction in the UPDRS score after the "practically defined off" test. Conclusion This series provides a profile of VP with predominant lower-limb involvement, freezing of gait and falls, pyramidal signs, executive dysfunction, concomitant vascular dementia, and poor levodopa response.
    Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria 10/2013; 71(10):757-62. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    Thiago Cardoso Vale, Andrew Lees, Francisco Cardoso
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    ABSTRACT: William Richard Gowers was born in 1845 in the London Borough of Hackney, at a time when a number of infec-tious epidemic diseases were sweeping across Western Europe and causing many fatalities. The fourth child of a Hackney lady shoemaker, by the age of 11 years, Gowers witnessed the death of both his younger siblings and fa-ther. His widowed mother then moved out of London to be closer to relatives in Oxford and Gowers "gained an ade-quate acquaintance of French, German, Latin, a mastery of incisive English of peculiar beauty and clarity, and a most elegant penmanship" 1 . Three years later, at the age of 16, William started to spend his summer holidays working on a farm in Yorkshire and there was a real possibility that he may have ended up as a farmer. He was eventually persuaded by his family that lived in Coggeshall in Essex to accept a two-year medical apprenticeship with one of the village doctors, Thomas Simpson 1,2 . In January 1863, Gowers' family moved to London and he passed the entrance examina-tion for University College London, in which he studied German, Greek, Latin, chemistry, botany, zoology, mathematics, geom-etry, English, and natural philosophy 1,2 . In 1865, the man em-barked on his undergraduate career and had the good fortune
    Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria 07/2013; 71(6):411-413. · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    Thiago Cardoso Vale, Andrew Lees, Francisco Cardoso
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    ABSTRACT: William Richard Gowers (1845-1915) spent his career working at the National Hospital for the Relief and Cure for the Paralyzed and Epileptic at Queen Square, in London, United Kingdom, and at the nearby University College Hospital. His "Manual of the Diseases of the Nervous System" and many published lectures were based almost entirely on his own clinical observations meticulously recorded in shorthand. In this paper, we have focused on an analysis of his inpatient case records from 1878 to 1911 preserved in the archives at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square. We reviewed all 42 volumes and analyzed 2,478 patients. Between 1897 and 1909, a mean of 129.7 cases per year were admitted to the hospital under Gowers' care. We grouped the diagnoses in 12 different categories. Epilepsy (16.5%), followed by spinal cord diseases (10.3%), cerebrovascular diseases (9.5%), and functional disorders (7.9%) were the most common diagnoses.
    Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria 06/2013; 71(6). · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Huntington's disease (HD) is a rare neurodegenerative disease with a multitude of symptoms, which requires access to specialized multidisciplinary care for adequate management. The aim of this study was to survey the characteristics of care in various HD centers in South America (SA). Methods A questionnaire was sent to 24 centers involved in the care for HD patients in SA. Results Of the total 24 centers, 19 (79.2%) are academic units. The majority of centers (62.5%) are general movement disorders clinics. Multidisciplinary care is available in 19 (79.2%) centers and in 20 (83.3%) care is provided free of charge. Genetic testing and counseling are available in 25 and 66.6% of centers, respectively. The majority of centers (83.3%) have no institutional support for end-stage care. Conclusions Although HD centers in SA are committed to providing multidisciplinary care, access to genetic counseling and end-stage care are lacking in most centers.
    Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria 06/2013; 71(6). · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 05/2013; · 3.27 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

785 Citations
296.06 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2014
    • Federal University of Minas Gerais
      • • Faculdade de Medicina
      • • Hospital das Clínicas
      Cidade de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2011–2013
    • Unimed Belo Horizonte
      Cidade de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2012
    • Universitário de Belo Horizonte - UNI-BH
      Cidade de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2009
    • Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais
      Cidade de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2006–2009
    • Hospital de Clínicas Niterói
      Vila Real da Praia Grande, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    • University of São Paulo
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    • Fundação Hospitalar do Estado de Minas Gerais
      Cidade de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2008
    • Hôpital La Pitié Salpêtrière (Groupe Hospitalier "La Pitié Salpêtrière - Charles Foix")
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2007
    • Universidade FUMEC
      Cidade de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil