Fumio Nagashima

University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States

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Publications (5)40.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Survival and response rates in metastatic colorectal cancer remain poor, despite advances in drug development. There is increasing evidence to suggest that gender-specific differences may contribute to poor clinical outcome. We tested the hypothesis that genomic profiling of metastatic colorectal cancer is dependent on gender. A total of 152 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were treated with oxaliplatin and continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil were genotyped for 21 polymorphisms in 13 cancer-related genes by PCR. Classification and regression tree analysis tested for gender-related association of polymorphisms with overall survival, progression-free survival and tumor response. Classification and regression tree analysis of all polymorphisms, age and race resulted in gender-specific predictors of overall survival, progression-free survival and tumor response. Polymorphisms in the following genes were associated with gender-specific clinical outcome: estrogen receptor β, EGF receptor, xeroderma pigmentosum group D, voltage-gated sodium channel and phospholipase A2. Genetic profiling to predict the clinical outcome of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer may depend on gender.
    Pharmacogenomics 01/2010; 12(1):27-39. · 3.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, an objective response rate of 12% was reported in a phase II study of cetuximab in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) refractory to fluoropyrimidine-, oxaliplatin-, and irinotecan-based chemotherapy (IMC-0144). In this large molecular correlates study, we tested whether K-ras mutation status and polymorphisms in genes involved in the EGFR-signaling pathway were associated with clinical outcome in IMC-0144. We analyzed all available tissue samples from 130 of 346 mCRC patients enrolled in the IMC-0144 phase II clinical trial of cetuximab. Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues, and K-ras mutation status and the genotypes were analyzed using PCR-RFLP, direct DNA-sequencing, and 5'-end [gamma-33P] ATP-labeled PCR-protocols. The PFS of patients with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) -765 G>C [C/C; risk ratio (RR), 0.31; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.12-0.84; P = 0.032], COX-2 +8473 T>C (C/C; RR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.40-1.13; P = 0.003), EGF +61 A>G (G/G; RR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.34-0.95; P = 0.042), and EGFR +497 G>A (A/G; RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.56-1.20; P = 0.017) genotypes was significantly longer compared with those with other genotypes. In addition, patients whose tumors did not have K-ras mutations showed better RR, PFS, and overall survival than patients with K-ras mutations. In multivariable analysis, COX-2 +8473 T>C (adjusted P = 0.013) and EGFR +497 G>A (adjusted P = 0.010) remained significantly associated with progression-free survival, independent of skin rash toxicity, K-ras mutation status, and Eastern Cooperative Group performance status. Polymorphisms in COX-2 and EGFR may be useful independent molecular markers to predict clinical outcome in patients with mCRC treated with single-agent cetuximab, independent of skin rash toxicity, K-ras mutation, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status.
    Clinical Cancer Research 01/2009; 14(23):7884-95. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Identifying molecular markers for tumor recurrence is critical in successfully selecting patients with stage III colon cancer who are more likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. The present study analyzed a subset of 10 polymorphisms within eight genes involved in the tumor angiogenesis pathway and their impact on prognosis in stage III colon cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Blood samples were obtained from 125 patients with locally advanced colon cancer at University of Southern California medical facilities. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and the genotypes were analyzed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 5'-end [gamma-(33)P] ATP-labeled PCR protocols. Polymorphisms in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (C+936T; P = 0.003, log-rank test) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) (T-251A; P = 0.04, log-rank test) were independently associated with risk of recurrence in stage III colon cancer patients. In combined analysis, grouping alleles into favorable versus nonfavorable alleles, high expression variants of VEGF C+936T and IL-8 T-251A were associated with a higher likelihood of developing tumor recurrence (P < 0.001). High expression variants of VEGF C+936T and IL-8 T-251A were associated with shorter time to tumor recurrence, indicating that the analysis of angiogenesis-related gene polymorphisms may help to identify patient subgroups at high risk for tumor recurrence.
    Annals of Oncology 06/2008; 19(10):1734-41. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor recurrence after curative resection is a major problem in the management of colon cancer therapy. Identifying molecular markers for tumor recurrence is critical for successfully selecting patients who are more likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. We analyzed the value of thymidylate synthase (TS) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms as a prognostic marker in stage II and stage III colon cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Between 1987 and 2007, blood samples were obtained from 197 patients with stage II or stage III colon cancer at medical facilities at the University of Southern California. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, and the genotypes were analyzed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Patients harboring the TS 3RG/+6-bp haplotype were at greatest risk to develop tumor recurrence [relative risk (RR): 2.25; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-4.85; adjusted P value=0.032]. TS enhancer region 3RG alone (RR: 3.48 years; 95% CI: 1.61-7.54; adjusted P value=0.013) or in combination with TS 1494del6 bp (RR: 3.41 years; 95% CI: 1.33-8.75; adjusted P value=0.044) proved to be adverse prognostic markers in both univariate and multivariable analysis. 'High-expression' variants of TS 2R/3R repeat, TS enhancer region 3R G/C, TS 1494del6 bp, and TS haplotype analysis might help to identify stage II and stage III colon cancer patients who are at great risk of developing tumor recurrence, and also those who are more likely to benefit from 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Larger, independent, prospective studies are, however, needed to confirm and validate our preliminary findings.
    Pharmacogenetics and Genomics 03/2008; 18(2):161-8. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cetuximab, a chimeric immunoglobulin G 1 (IgG1) anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (mAb), has shown efficacy in 10% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Recent studies demonstrate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the modes of action for rituximab and trastuzumab. Fragment c (Fc) portion of IgG1 mAb has shown to induce ADCC. Fragment c gamma receptors (FcgammaR) play an important role in initiating ADCC. Studies have shown that two IgG FcgammaR polymorphisms (FCGR2A-H131R and FCGR3A-V158F) independently predict response to rituximab in patients with follicular lymphoma. We tested the hypothesis of whether these two polymorphisms are associated with clinical outcome in metastatic CRC patients treated with single-agent cetuximab. Thirty-nine metastatic CRC patients were enrolled onto the ImClone0144 trial. Using an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) -based method, gene polymorphisms of FCGA2A-H131R and FCGA3A-V158F were assessed from genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood samples. FCGR2A-H131R and FCGR3A-V158F polymorphisms were independently associated with progression-free survival (PFS; P = .037 and .055, respectively; log-rank test). Combined analysis of these two polymorphisms showed that patients with the favorable genotypes (FCGR2A, any histidine allele, and FCGR3A, any phenylalanine allele) showed a median PFS of 3.7 months (95% CI, 2.4 to 4.4 months), whereas patients with any two unfavorable genotypes (FCGR2A arginine/arginine or valine/valine) had a PFS of 1.1 months (95% CI, 1.0 to 1.4 months; P = .004; log-rank test). Our preliminary data suggest that these two polymorphisms may be useful molecular markers to predict clinical outcome in metastatic CRC patients treated with cetuximab and that they may indicate a role of ADCC of cetuximab.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 09/2007; 25(24):3712-8. · 18.04 Impact Factor