F Puisieux

University of Lille Nord de France, Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France

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Publications (81)81.19 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis is generally a quiescent process which, however, may be modified by different physiological and pathological conditions. The "angiogenic paradox" has been described in diabetes because this disease impairs the angiogenic response in a manner that differs depending on the organs involved and disease evolution. Aging is also associated with pro- and antiangiogenic processes. Glycation, the post-translational modification of proteins, increases with aging and the progression of diabetes. The effect of glycation on angiogenesis depends on the type of glycated proteins and cells involved. This complex link could be responsible for the "angiogenic paradox" in aging and age-related disorders and diseases. Using diabetes as a model, the present work has attempted to review the age-related angiogenic paradox, in particular the effects of glycation on angiogenesis during aging.
    Ageing research reviews 04/2014; · 5.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assess orthostatic hypotension (OH) prevalence in elderly fallers and determine OH-associated risk factors in this patient population. A monocentric prospective study at Lille University Hospital Falls Clinic included 833 consecutive patients who had fallen or were at high risk of falls and who were assessed for the presence of OH. Among 833 patients aged 80.4±7.4 years, OH was found in 199 subjects (23.9% of cases). Multivariate analysis showed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (odds ratio (OR) 2.42, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.56-3.75), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 1.93-14.97), Parkinsonian syndrome (OR 2.54, 95% CI: 1.54-4.19), excessive alcohol consumption (OR 2.17, 95% CI: 1.32-3.56), meprobamate (OR 2.65, 95% CI: 1.12-6.25) and calcium channel blockers (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.16-2.76) were all risk factors for OH. In contrast, angiotensin receptor blockers (OR 0.52, 95% CI: 0.30-0.91) appeared to be protective factors against OH. This study demonstrates that a systematic investigation should be made in all elderly fallers and those at high risk of falls to detect the presence of OH. In OH patients, in addition to the usual predisposing factors, excessive alcohol consumption and psychotropic drug intake-in particular, the intake of serotonergic antidepressants-should be taken into account as potential risk factors.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 19 September 2013; doi:10.1038/jhh.2013.82.
    Journal of human hypertension 09/2013; · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Swallowing disorders (or dysphagia) are common in the elderly and their prevalence is often underestimated. They may result in serious complications including dehydration, malnutrition, airway obstruction, aspiration pneumonia (infectious process) or pneumonitis (chemical injury caused by the inhalation of sterile gastric contents). Moreover the repercussions of dysphagia are not only physical but also emotional and social, leading to depression, altered quality of life, and social isolation. While some changes in swallowing may be a natural result of aging, dysphagia in the elderly is mainly due to central nervous system diseases such as stroke, parkinsonism, dementia, medications, local oral and oesophageal factors. To be effective, management requires a multidisciplinary team approach and a careful assessment of the patient's oropharyngeal anatomy and physiology, medical and nutritional status, cognition, language and behaviour. Clinical evaluation can be completed by a videofluoroscopic study which enables observation of bolus movement and movements of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx throughout the swallow. The treatment depends on the underlying cause, extent of dysphagia and prognosis. Various categories of treatment are available, including compensatory strategies (postural changes and dietary modification), direct or indirect therapy techniques (swallow manoeuvres, medication and surgical procedures).
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 10/2011; 28(8):e76-93. · 0.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fear of falling may be as debilitating as the fall itself, leading to a restriction in activities and even a loss of autonomy. The main objective was to evaluate the prevalence of the fear of falling among elderly fallers. The secondary objectives were to determine the factors associated with the fear of falling and evaluate the impact of this fear on the activity "getting out of the house". Prospective study conducted between 1995 and 2006 in which fallers and patients at high risk for falling were seen at baseline by the multidisciplinary falls consultation team (including a geriatrician, a neurologist and a physical medicine and rehabilitation physician) and then, again 6 month later, by the same geriatrician. The fear of falling was evaluated with a yes/no question: "are you afraid of falling?". Out of 635 patients with a mean age of 80.6 years, 502 patients (78%) expressed a fear of falling. Patients with fear of falling were not older than those who did not report this fear, but the former were mostly women (P<0,001), who experienced more falls in the 6 months preceding the consultation (P=0.01), reported more frequently a long period of time spent on the floor after a fall (P<0.001), had more balance disorders (P=0.002) and finally, were using more frequently a walking technical aid (P=0.02). Patients with fear of falling were not going out alone as much as the fearless group (31% vs 53%, P<0.0001). Eighty-two percent of patients in the fearful group admitted to avoiding going out because they were afraid of falling. The strong prevalence of the fear of falling observed in this population and its consequences in terms of restricted activities justifies systematically screening for it in fallers or patients at risk for falling.
    Annals of physical and rehabilitation medicine 06/2011; 54(4):248-58.
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    ABSTRACT: Cited By (since 1996):23, Export Date: 18 October 2014
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 01/2011; 93(1):200-210. · 6.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vascular accelerated aging represents the major cause of morbidity and mortality in subjects with diabetes mellitus. In the present study, our aim was to compare premature functional and morphological changes in the arterial wall resulting from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus in mice over a short-term period with those that develop during physiological aging. The effect of aminoguanidine (AG) on the prevention of these alterations in the diabetic group was also analyzed. The vascular relaxation response to acetylcholine (ACh) in the mouse was tested in isolated segments of phenylephrine (Phe)-precontracted aorta at 2, 4 and 8 weeks (wk) of STZ-induced diabetes and compare to 12- and 84-wk-old mice. Aortic structural changes were investigated, and receptor for AGE (RAGE) aortic expression was quantified by western blot. Compared to the 12-wk control group (76 ± 5%), significant endothelium-dependant relaxation (EDR) impairment was found in the group of 12-wk-old mice, which underwent a 4-wk diabetes-inducing STZ treatment (12wk-4WD) (52 ± 4%; P < 0.01) and was yet more apparent in the group of 16-wk-old mice, which underwent an 8-wk diabetes-inducing STZ treatment (16wk-8WD) (34 ± 4%; P < 0.001). The alteration in EDR was relatively comparable between the diabetic 12wk-4WD group and the 84-wk-old group (52.7 ± 4 vs. 48 ± 4%). Intima/media aortic thickening and aortic structural changes were significantly increased in the diabetic 12wk-4WD group and were even more apparent in the 84-wk group compared to the 12-wk controls. AG treatment in the 12wk-4WD+AG diabetic group significantly improved EDR, decreased RAGE expression and showed an aging preventive effect on the structural changes of the arterial wall. Our study compared EDR linked to physiological aging with that observed in the case of STZ-induced diabetes over a short-term period, and demonstrated the beneficial effect of AG.
    Diabetes & Metabolism 12/2010; 37(2):106-11. · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background People with neurological disorders including stroke, dementia, Parkinson's disease, and polyneuropathy are known to have an increased risk of falls.
    Revue Neurologique - REV NEUROL. 01/2010; 166(2):235-241.
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    ABSTRACT: In elderly individuals balance disorders and muscle weakness can lead to prescribing a walker. There are several different models. According to the very poor effort tolerance in this population, the energy cost necessary to operate walking technical aids should be taken into account when making a choice. Compare two types of walker in regards to energy cost produced during gait in weakened elderly individuals. Thirty subjects over the age of 65 (six men and 24 women, mean age 81.9 years) were admitted in geriatrics care. They all required a walker and performed the same 10-m course with a fixed walker, then with a model bearing front wheels. The walking speed (S) was computed, heart rate at rest (HRrest) and maximum heart rate (HRmax) were recorded during the test. The physiological cost index (PCI=HRmax-HRrest/S) was calculated. Finally a timed get-up-and-go (TGUG) test was performed with each of these technical aids. With a rollator walker, HRmax was lower (P<0.05) and S higher (P<0.001). It was 2.01 with a fixed walker versus 1.23 with a rollator walker (P<0.01). We found this speed difference during the TGUG test (72.26 sec vs. 82.93 sec, P=0.001). There are very little studies on the evaluation of physiological energy cost produced during gait with a walker. The characteristics of our population did not allow us to conduct our test without a technical aid. The use of a fixed walker leads to a major increase in gait PCI, probably due to the required repeated efforts for lifting the walker. This model must be avoided in case of cardiac or respiratory disorders.
    Annals of physical and rehabilitation medicine 01/2010; 53(6-7):399-405.
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    ABSTRACT: People with neurological disorders including stroke, dementia, Parkinson's disease, and polyneuropathy are known to have an increased risk of falls. To evaluate the prevalence and nature of neurological risk factors among the patients attending the Multidisciplinary Falls Consultation of the University Hospital of Lille (France), and to analyze the characteristic features of patients termed "neurological fallers" with neurological risk factors. The study included 266 consecutive patients who were initially assessed by a geriatrician, a neurologist and a physiatrist, and again, six months later, by the same geriatrician. Two out of three patients had neurological signs that can be regarded as neurological risk factors of falling. These neurological signs had not been diagnosed before the consultation in 85% of cases. The most common conditions were deficit of lower extremity proprioception (59% of patients) and cognitive impairment (43%). The most frequently evoked neurological diseases were dementia (40% of patients), polyneuropathy (17%) and stroke (8%). Compared with other patients, "neurological fallers" were more frequently living in a nursing home, had lower ADL and MMSE scores at baseline, had experienced more falls in the six preceding months, had a lower probability of having a timed Up-and-Go test less than 20 seconds and a single limb stance equal to 5 seconds. In the follow-up, "neurological fallers" reported hospitalizations more often. The findings show that a large proportion of old persons presenting at the Multidisciplinary Falls Consultation have unrecognized neurological disorders. Comprehensive neurological examination including an evaluation of cognition is required in every elderly faller.
    Revue Neurologique 08/2009; 166(2):235-41. · 0.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Under the auspices of the Societe Francaise de Geriatrie et Gerontologie, a multi-disciplinary group of specialists in geriatrics, neurology, epidemiology, psychiatry, neuroradiology and nuclear medicine met with the aim of drawing up references on the methods for diagnosing and treating mild Alzheimer's disease. The critical analysis of international literature, conducted by Professor Bruno Vellas for the scientific committee, has served to support study of the latest knowledge in 2008. The multi-disciplinary group met on 14 and 15 May 2008 in order to set out the questions that this study must answer and to allocate draft studies. Thus, it has been possible to conduct a study focused on mild Alzheimer's disease, giving particular attention to diagnostic procedure, specific methods of treatment and the benefits of making a diagnosis.
    The Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging 08/2009; 13(6):503-19. · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Swallowing disorders (or dysphagia) are common in the elderly and their prevalence is often underestimated. They may result in serious complications including dehydration, malnutrition, airway obstruction, aspiration pneumonia (infectious process) or pneumonitis (chemical injury caused by the inhalation of sterile gastric contents). Moreover the repercussions of dysphagia are not only physical but also emotional and social, leading to depression, altered quality of life, and social isolation. While some changes in swallowing may be a natural result of aging, dysphagia in the elderly is mainly due to central nervous system diseases such as stroke, parkinsonism, dementia, medications, local oral and oesophageal factors.To be effective, management requires a multidisciplinary team approach and a careful assessment of the patient's oropharyngeal anatomy and physiology, medical and nutritional status, cognition, language and behaviour. Clinical evaluation can be completed by a videofluoroscopic study which enables observation of bolus movement and movements of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx throughout the swallow. The treatment depends on the underlying cause, extent of dysphagia and prognosis. Various categories of treatment are available, including compensatory strategies (postural changes and dietary modification), direct or indirect therapy techniques (swallow manoeuvres, medication and surgical procedures).
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 06/2009; 26(6):587-605. · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • Diabetes & Metabolism - DIABETES METAB. 01/2009; 35.
  • Revue De Medecine Interne - REV MED INTERNE. 01/2009; 30.
  • Revue De Medecine Interne - REV MED INTERNE. 01/2009; 30.
  • La Revue de Médecine Interne 10/2008; 29(12):1054-7. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) accumulate in aging tissues and organs during rheumatoid arthritis and Alzheimer disease. These aging toxins are especially involved in cell alteration during diabetes mellitus (glycotoxin) and renal failure (uremic toxin). AGEs participate to the endothelial dysfunction leading to diabetic macro but also micro-angiopathy. AGEs binding to cell receptors are critical steps in the deleterious consequences of AGE excess. AGE-receptor activation altered cell and organ functions by a pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrosis factors cell response. CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND KEY POINTS: Non-enzymatic glycation and glycoxidation with glucose auto-oxidation represent the two main pathways resulting in AGE formation. No exclusive AGE classification is actually available. Pathophysiological mechanisms are described to explain AGE toxicity. AGEs bind to cell receptors inducing deleterious consequences such as endothelial dysfunction after endothelial RAGE activation. AGEs can also have deleterious effects through glycated protein accumulation or in situ protein glycation. FUTURE PROSPECTS AND PROJECTS: Many in vitro or animal studies demonstrated that AGE deleterious effects can be prevented by glycation inhibitors, AGE cross-link breakers or AGE-RAGE interaction inhibition. New molecules are actually studied as new strategy to prevent or treat the deleterious effects of these aging toxins.
    La Revue de Médecine Interne 01/2008; 28(12):832-40. · 0.90 Impact Factor
  • Revue De Medecine Interne - REV MED INTERNE. 01/2008; 29(12):1054-1057.
  • Diabetes & Metabolism - DIABETES METAB. 01/2008; 34.
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    ABSTRACT: In France, the average age for the diagnosis of bronchial carcinoma is 64. It is 76 in the population of over 70. In fact, its incidence increases with age linked intrinsic risk of developing a cancer and with general ageing of the population. Diagnosis tools are the same for elderlies than for younger patients, and positive diagnosis mainly depends on fibreoptic bronchoscopy, complications of which being comparable to those observed in younger patients. The assessment of dissemination has been modified in recent years by the availability of PET scanning which is increasingly becoming the examination of choice for preventing unnecessary surgical intervention, a fortiori in elderly subjects. Cerebral imaging by tomodensitometry and nuclear magnetic resonance should systematically be obtained before proposing chirurgical treatment. An assessment of the general state of health of the elderly subject is an essential step before the therapeutic decision is made. This depends on the concept of geriatric evaluation: Geriatric Multidimensional Assessment, and the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment which concerns overall competence of the elderly. This is a global approach that allows precise definition and ranking of the patient's problems and their impact on daily life and social environment. Certain geriatric variables (IADL, BADL, MMSE, IMC etc) may be predictive of survival rates after chemotherapy or the incidence of complications following thoracic surgery. The main therapeutic principles for the management of bronchial carcinoma are applicable to the elderly subject; long term survival without relapse after surgical resection is independent of age. Whether the oncological strategy is curative or palliative, the elderly patient with bronchial carcinoma should receive supportive treatments. They should be integrated into a palliative programme if such is the case. In fact, age alone is not a factor that should detract from optimal oncological management. The development of an individual management programme for an elderly patient suffering from bronchial carcinoma should be based on the combination of oncological investigation and comprehensive geriatric assessment.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 07/2007; 24(6):703-23. · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • Revue De Medecine Interne - REV MED INTERNE. 01/2007; 28:112-112.

Publication Stats

277 Citations
81.19 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2013
    • University of Lille Nord de France
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 1994–2011
    • Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Lille
      • Division of Internal Medicine
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 1994–2001
    • CHRU de Strasbourg
      Strasburg, Alsace, France