Fikret Erdogan

Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlín, Berlin, Germany

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Publications (24)98.83 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: During the past years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the development of the human brain, and much of this knowledge comes from genetic studies of disorders associated with abnormal brain development. We employed array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate copy number variants (CNVs) in a cohort of 169 patients with various structural brain malformations including lissencephaly, polymicrogyria, focal cortical dysplasia, and corpus callosum agenesis. The majority of the patients had intellectual disabilities (ID) and suffered from symptomatic epilepsy. We detected at least one rare CNV in 38 patients (22.5%). All genes located within the rare CNVs were subjected to enrichment analysis for specific Gene Ontology Terms or Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways and to protein-protein network analysis. Based on these analyses, we propose that genes involved in "axonal transport," "cation transmembrane transporter activity," and the "c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) cascade" play a significant role in the etiology of brain malformations. This is to the best of our knowledge the first systematic study of CNVs in patients with structural brain malformations and our data show that CNVs play an important role in the etiology of these malformations, either as direct causes or as genetic risk factors.
    Human Mutation 08/2011; 32(12):1427-35. · 5.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interstitial deletions of chromosome band 4q32 are rare. We report on a 22-year-old female patient with a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 4q32 and a balanced translocation t(2;5)(p21;q12.1). Clinical problems of the patient comprised mild to moderate mental retardation, psychosis, obesity, broad nasal root, sparse lateral eyebrows, thin upper lip, short philtrum, micrognathia, and strabismus. Analysis by whole genome array CGH using an Agilent 244K oligonucleotide array and subsequent FISH using BAC clones from the 4q32 region revealed an unexpectedly complex rearrangement comprising a deletion of approximately 10 Mb in 4q32.1q32.3 and the insertion of two small fragments of 0.8 and 0.11 Mb originating from the derivative chromosome 4q32 into derivative chromosome 5q. The breakpoints of the t(2;5) translocation were mapped by BAC-FISH; no genes were disrupted by these breakpoints. The deleted interval in 4q32 harbored more than 30 genes, and haploinsufficiency of one or several of these genes is likely to have caused the clinical problems of the patient. Candidate genes for cognitive defects are GRIA2, GLRB, NPY1R, and NPY5R. In conclusion, this patient increases our knowledge about the phenotypic consequences of interstitial 4q32 deletions. Reports of patients with overlapping deletions will be needed to elucidate the role of individual genes and to establish genotype–phenotype correlations. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 03/2010; 152A(4):1008 - 1012. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on three individuals of Muslim Arab origin from a village located in Northern Israel affected by an apparent autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by distinctive facial phenotype of which the most prominent feature is ocular hypertelorism. The other clinical features of the syndrome include variable degree of mental retardation, genital abnormalities dominated by short penis, and skeletal abnormalities including chest deformity (combination of upper pectus carinatum with lower pectus excavatum), and short palms with broad short fingers. Affected individuals displayed distinctive facial features including upslanting palpebral fissures, thick eyebrows, long philtrum, wide mouth with thin upper lip and upturned corners of the mouth, widow's peak, broad nasal bridge, and simple ears with fleshy overfolded helices. This phenotype does not fully meet typical diagnostic features of any known condition.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 12/2009; 149A(12):2655-60. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interstitial deletions of chromosome band 10q22 are rare. We report on the characterization of three overlapping de novo 10q22 deletions by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in three unrelated patients. Patient 1 had a 7.9 Mb deletion in 10q21.3-q22.2 and suffered from severe feeding problems, facial dysmorphisms and profound mental retardation. Patients 2 and 3 had nearly identical deletions of 3.2 and 3.6 Mb, the proximal breakpoints of which were located at an identical low-copy repeat. Both patients were mentally retarded; patient 3 also suffered from growth retardation and hypotonia. We also report on the results of breakpoint analysis by array painting in a mentally retarded patient with a balanced chromosome translocation 46,XY,t(10;13)(q22;p13)dn. The breakpoint in 10q22 was found to disrupt C10orf11, a brain-expressed gene in the common deleted interval of patients 1-3. This finding suggests that haploinsufficiency of C10orf11 contributes to the cognitive defects in 10q22 deletion patients.
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 10/2009; 18(3):291-5. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Most cases are sporadic and of unknown aetiology. In this study, we screened 72 patients with sporadic ALS for the presence of DNA copy number variations, in order to identify novel candidate disease genes. We have used sub-megabase resolution BAC array comparative genomic hybridization to detect genomic imbalances in our ALS patient cohort. Aberrations with potential relevance for disease aetiology were verified by oligo array CGH. In 72 patients with sporadic ALS, we identified a total of six duplications and five deletions that scored above our threshold. Nine of these 11 variations were smaller than 1Mb, and five were observed exclusively in ALS patients. In conclusion, non-polymorphic sub-microscopic duplications and deletions observable by array CGH are frequent in patients with sporadic ALS. Analysis of such aberrations serves as a starting point in deciphering the aetiology of this complex disease, given that affected genes can be considered candidates for influencing disease susceptibility.
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis 12/2008; 10(3):162-9. · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect and affects nearly 1% of newborns. The aetiology of CHD is largely unknown and only a small percentage can be assigned to environmental risk factors such as maternal diseases or exposure to mutagenic agents during pregnancy. Chromosomal imbalances have been identified in many forms of syndromic CHD, but very little is known about the impact of DNA copy number changes in non-syndromic CHD. A sub-megabase resolution array comparative genome hybridisation (CGH) screen was carried out on 105 patients with CHD as the sole abnormality at the time of diagnosis. There were 18 chromosomal changes detected, which do not coincide with common DNA copy number variants, including one de novo deletion, two de novo duplications and eight familial copy number variations (one deletion and seven duplications). Our data show that submicroscopic deletions and duplications play an important role in the aetiology of this condition, either as direct causes or as genetic risk factors for CHD. These findings have immediate consequences for genetic counselling and should pave the way for the elucidation of the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying CHD.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 09/2008; 45(11):704-9. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Balanced chromosome rearrangements (BCRs) can cause genetic diseases by disrupting or inactivating specific genes, and the characterization of breakpoints in disease-associated BCRs has been instrumental in the molecular elucidation of a wide variety of genetic disorders. However, mapping chromosome breakpoints using traditional methods, such as in situ hybridization with fluorescent dye-labeled bacterial artificial chromosome clones (BAC-FISH), is rather laborious and time-consuming. In addition, the resolution of BAC-FISH is often insufficient to unequivocally identify the disrupted gene. To overcome these limitations, we have performed shotgun sequencing of flow-sorted derivative chromosomes using "next-generation" (Illumina/Solexa) multiplex sequencing-by-synthesis technology. As shown here for three different disease-associated BCRs, the coverage attained by this platform is sufficient to bridge the breakpoints by PCR amplification, and this procedure allows the determination of their exact nucleotide positions within a few weeks. Its implementation will greatly facilitate large-scale breakpoint mapping and gene finding in patients with disease-associated balanced translocations.
    Genome Research 08/2008; 18(7):1143-9. · 14.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on a young female patient with the clinical features of blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES, OMIM 110100) and a balanced chromosome translocation 46, XX, t(2;3)(q33;q23)dn.BPES is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder characterized by the eponymous oculo-facial features that are, in female patients, associated either with (type 1 BPES) or without (type 2 BPES) premature ovarian failure. Both types of BPES are caused by heterozygous mutations in the FOXL2 gene, which is located in chromosome band 3q23. Chromosome aberrations such as balanced rearrangements have only rarely been observed in BPES patients but can provide valuable information about regulatory regions of FOXL2. The translocation in this patient broadens our knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms in BPES and highlights the importance of conventional cytogenetic investigations in patients with negative results of FOXL2 mutation screening as a prerequisite for optimal management and genetic counseling.
    Ophthalmic Genetics 04/2008; 29(1):37-40. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Deletions of chromosome bands 13q33-34 are rare. Patients with such deletions have mental retardation, microcephaly, and distinct facial features. Male patients frequently also have genital malformations. We report on four patients with three overlapping deletions of 13q33-34 that have been characterized by tiling-path array-CGH. Patient 1 had mental retardation and microcephaly with an interstitial 4.7 Mb deletion and a translocation t(12;13)(q13.3;q32.3). His mother (Patient 2), who also had mental retardation and microcephaly, carried the identical chromosome aberration. Patient 3 was a girl with a de novo insertion ins(7;13)(p15.1;q22q31) and interstitial 4.5 Mb deletion in 13q33-34. She had mental retardation and microcephaly. Patient 4 was a newborn boy with severe genital malformation (penoscrotal transposition and hypospadias) and microcephaly. He had a de novo ring chromosome 13 lacking the terminal 9.3 Mb of 13q. Karyotype-phenotype comparisons of these and eight previously published del13q33-34 patients suggest EFNB2 as a candidate gene for genital malformations in males. Molecular cytogenetic definition of a common deleted region in all patients suggests ARHGEF7 as a candidate gene for mental retardation and microcephaly.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 03/2008; 146(3):337-42. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Copy number variations (CNVs) account for a substantial proportion of human genomic variation, and have been shown to cause neurodevelopmental disorders. We sought to determine the relevance of CNVs to the aetiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Whole-genome, high-resolution, tiling path BAC array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) was employed to test DNA from 93 individuals with DSM-IV SZ. Common DNA copy number changes that are unlikely to be directly pathogenic in SZ were filtered out by comparison to a reference dataset of 372 control individuals analyzed in our laboratory, and a screen against the Database of Genomic Variants. The remaining aberrations were validated with Affymetrix 250K SNP arrays or 244K Agilent oligo-arrays and tested for inheritance from the parents. A total of 13 aberrations satisfied our criteria. Two of them are very likely to be pathogenic. The first one is a deletion at 2p16.3 that was present in an affected sibling and disrupts NRXN1. The second one is a de novo duplication at 15q13.1 spanning APBA2. The proteins of these two genes interact directly and play a role in synaptic development and function. Both genes have been affected by CNVs in patients with autism and mental retardation, but neither has been previously implicated in SZ.
    Human Molecular Genetics 03/2008; 17(3):458-65. · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Duplications of the short arm of the X chromosome in male patients are rare. We report on the clinical features of mentally retarded patients in two families with different interstitial duplications of Xp and their characterization by tiling path array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). In Family A, we detected a duplication of 9.3 Mb in Xp11p21 in a male with severe mental retardation [karyotype 46,XY,dup(X)(p11.3p21.1)] and his healthy mother. The clinical features of this patient--severe mental retardation, obesity, macrocephaly--are in accordance with those of a previously reported patient with a similar duplication. In Family B, a duplication of 8.5 Mb was diagnosed in Xp22 in three male patients with mental retardation [karyotype 46,XY,dup(X)(p22.11p22.2)] and two healthy females. Characterization of the duplications by array CGH enabled the identification of the genes within these intervals. These comprise known mental retardation genes such as MAOA, NDP, TM4SF2, NDP, RSK2, and CDKL5. Duplication of MAOA will be discussed as a possible cause of obesity.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 02/2008; 146A(2):197-203. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study we report a female patient with an interstitial duplication of a region (10q22-q23) which is rarely reported in the literature. We fine mapped the aberration with array CGH, which revealed an 18.6-Mb duplication, covering 89 annotated genes, at 10q22.2-q23.33. There were no other deletions or duplications elsewhere in the genome. The main clinical features of the patient are microcephaly and congenital heart disease, which are likely to be caused by dosage effect of one or several genes in the duplicated region. Similar phenotypes have been found in other patients with 10q11-q22 duplications and in two out of three patients with 10q22-q25 duplications. However, most of the duplication cases were investigated only by conventional chromosome analyses, and fine mapping of these and other duplications of 10q22-q23 are warranted for genotype-phenotype comparisons.
    European Journal of Medical Genetics 01/2008; 51(1):81-6. · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autism and mental retardation (MR) are often associated, suggesting that these conditions are etiologically related. Recently, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) has identified submicroscopic deletions and duplications as a common cause of MR, prompting us to search for such genomic imbalances in autism. Here we describe a 1.5-Mb duplication on chromosome 16p13.1 that was found by high-resolution array CGH in four severe autistic male patients from three unrelated families. The same duplication was identified in several variably affected and unaffected relatives. A deletion of the same interval was detected in three unrelated patients with MR and other clinical abnormalities. In one patient we revealed a further rearrangement of the 16p13 imbalance that was not present in his unaffected mother. Duplications and deletions of this 1.5-Mb interval have not been described as copy number variants in the Database of Genomic Variants and have not been identified in >600 individuals from other cohorts examined by high-resolution array CGH in our laboratory. Thus we conclude that these aberrations represent recurrent genomic imbalances which predispose to autism and/or MR.
    Human Mutation 08/2007; 28(7):674-82. · 5.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on three unrelated mentally disabled patients, each carrying a de novo balanced translocation that truncates the autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2) gene at 7q11.2. One of our patients shows relatively mild mental retardation; the other two display more profound disorders. One patient is also physically disabled, exhibiting urogenital and limb malformations in addition to severe mental retardation. The function of AUTS2 is presently unknown, but it has been shown to be disrupted in monozygotic twins with autism and mental retardation, both carrying a translocation t(7;20)(q11.2;p11.2) (de la Barra et al. in Rev Chil Pediatr 57:549-554, 1986; Sultana et al. in Genomics 80:129-134, 2002). Given the overlap of this autism/mental retardation (MR) phenotype and the MR-associated disorders in our patients, together with the fact that mapping of the additional autosomal breakpoints involved did not disclose obvious candidate disease genes, we ascertain with this study that AUTS2 mutations are clearly linked to autosomal dominant mental retardation.
    Human Genetics 06/2007; 121(3-4):501-9. · 4.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on a 42-year-old female patient with an interstitial 16 Mb deletion in 7q21.1-21.3 and a balanced reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 6 and 7 [karyotype 46,XX,t(6;7)(q23.3;q32.3)del(7)(q21.1q21.3)de novo]. We characterized the size and position of the deletion by tiling path array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and we mapped the translocation breakpoints on chromosomes 6 and 7 by FISH. The clinical features of this patient-severe mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly and deafness-are in accordance with previously reported patients with 7q21 deletions. Chromosome band 7q21.3 harbors a locus for split hand/split foot malformation (SHFM1), and part of this locus, including the SHFM1 candidate genes SHFM1, DLX5, and DLX6, is deleted. The absence of limb abnormalities in this patient suggests either a location of the SHFM1 causing factor distal to this deletion, or reduced penetrance of haploinsufficiency of a SHFM1 factor within the deleted interval.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 03/2007; 143(4):333-7. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most patients with neurofibromatosis (NF1) are endowed with heterozygous mutations in the NF1 gene. Approximately 5% show an interstitial deletion of chromosome 17q11.2 (including NF1) and in most cases also a more severe phenotype. Here we report on a 7-year-old girl with classical NF1 signs, and in addition mild overgrowth (97th percentile), relatively low OFC (10th-25th percentile), facial dysmorphy, hoarse voice, and developmental delay. FISH analysis revealed a 17q11.2 microdeletion as well as an unbalanced 7p;13q translocation leading to trisomy of the 7q36.3 subtelomeric region. The patient's mother and grandmother who were phenotypically normal carried the same unbalanced translocation. The 17q11.2 microdeletion had arisen de novo. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) demonstrated gain of a 550-kb segment from 7qter and loss of 2.5 Mb from 17q11.2 (an atypical NF1 microdeletion). We conclude that the patient's phenotype is caused by the atypical NF1 deletion, whereas 7q36.3 trisomy represents a subtelomeric copy number variation without phenotypic consequences. To our knowledge this is the first report that a duplication of the subtelomeric region of chromosome 7q containing functional genes (FAM62B, WDR60, and VIPR2) can be tolerated without phenotypic consequences. The 17q11.2 microdeletion (containing nine more genes than the common NF1 microdeletions) and the 7qter duplication were not accompanied by unexpected clinical features. Most likely the 7qter trisomy and the 17q11.2 microdeletion coincide by chance in our patient.
    Cytogenetic and Genome Research 02/2007; 119(1-2):158-64. · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-resolution array CGH utilizing sets of overlapping BAC and PAC clones ("tiling path") covering the whole genome is a powerful novel tool for fast detection of submicroscopic chromosome deletions or duplications. We describe the successful application of a submegabase resolution whole genome "tiling path" BAC array to confirm and characterize a de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 15. The deletion has a size of 5.3 Mb and is located within chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. The affected girl had a heart defect, cleft palate, recurrent infections, and developmental delay. In contrast to GTG banding, array CGH determined the exact number of deleted genes and thus allowed the identification of candidate genes for cleft palate (GREM1, CX36, MEIS2), congenital heart defect (ACTC, GREM1, CX36, MEIS2), and mental retardation (ARHGAP11A, CHRNA7, CHRM5).
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 02/2007; 143(2):172-8. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on a girl with delayed mental and motor development, ophthalmological abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathy. Chromosome analysis suggested a deletion within chromosome 8p. Further investigation by array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) delineated an 8 Mb interstitial deletion on the short arm of chromosome 8. The breakpoints are located at chromosome bands 8p12 and 8p21.2. Forty-two known genes including gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GNRH1), transcription factor EBF2, exostosin-like 3 (EXTL3), glutathione reductase (GSR), and neuregulin 1 (NRG1), are located within the deleted region on chromosome 8p. A comparison of our patient with the cases described in the literature is presented, and we discuss the genotype-phenotype correlation in our patient. This is the first report of array-CGH analysis of an interstitial deletion at chromosome 8p.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 05/2006; 140(8):873-7. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fine mapping of chromosomal deletions and genotype-phenotype comparisons of clinically well-defined patients can be used to confirm or reveal loci and genes associated with human disorders. Eleven patients with cytogenetically visible deletions involving the terminal region of chromosome 5q have been described, but the extent of the deletion was determined only in one case. In this study we describe a 15-year-old boy with Ebstein anomaly, atrial septal defect (ASD), atrioventricular (AV) conduction defect, and microcephaly. He had an apparently balanced paracentric inversion of chromosome 5, with the karyotype 46, XY,inv(5)(q13q35) de novo. Further mapping of the chromosome breakpoints using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed a 2.2 Mb microdeletion at the 5q35 breakpoint, which spans 16 genes, including the cardiac homeobox transcription factor gene NKX2-5. The current data suggest that haploinsufficiency of NKX2-5 cause Ebstein anomaly and support previous results showing that NKX2-5 mutations cause ASD and AV conduction defect. Furthermore, we suggest presence of a new microcephaly locus within a 2.2 Mb region at 5q35.1-q35.2.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 03/2006; 140(5):427-33. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Very little is known about the molecular basis of autosomal recessive MR (ARMR) because in developed countries, small family sizes preclude mapping and identification of the relevant gene defects. We therefore chose to investigate genetic causes of ARMR in large consanguineous Iranian families. This study reports on a family with six mentally retarded members. Array-based homozygosity mapping and high-resolution microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) revealed a deletion of approximately 150-200 kb, encompassing the promoter and the first six exons of the MCPH1 gene, one out of four genes that have been previously implicated in ARMR with microcephaly. Reexamination of affected individuals revealed a high proportion of prematurely condensed chromosomes, which is a hallmark of this condition, but in spite of the severity of the mutation, all patients showed only borderline to mild microcephaly. Therefore the phenotypic spectrum of MCPH1 mutations may be wider than previously assumed, with ARMR being the only consistent clinical finding.
    Human Genetics 03/2006; 118(6):708-15. · 4.63 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

875 Citations
98.83 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2011
    • Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics
      • Department of Human Molecular Genetics
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 2008
    • University of Copenhagen
      • Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
    • Cardiff University
      • Department of Psychological Medicine and Neurology
      Cardiff, WLS, United Kingdom
  • 2006
    • Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin
      • Institute of Medical Genetics and Human Genetics
      Berlin, Land Berlin, Germany
  • 2001
    • Freie Universität Berlin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany