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Publications (4)4.71 Total impact

  • F.P. Dawalibi, Wei Xiong, Jinxi Ma
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    ABSTRACT: When lightning strikes an electric substation, large currents generated by the stroke flow in the above ground structures and grounding system and dissipate in the soil. The electromagnetic fields generated by such high currents may cause damage to equipment and may be dangerous to personnel working nearby. In this paper, the frequency and time domain performance of a substation subjected to a lightning strike is described and discussed. The computed scalar potentials, electric fields, and magnetic fields are presented graphically as a function of spatial coordinates. As a function of time and as a function of both. Two cases are considered. The first case examines the substation grounding system only, while the second case includes an above-ground structure as well. It is believed that the results of the second case have not been published before. A double exponential lightning surge current is injected at one corner of the substation. The response of the grounding system to the frequency domain electromagnetic spectrum of this signal is computed by a frequency domain electromagnetic field analysis software package. The temporal and spatial distributions of the electromagnetic fields inside and near the substation are obtained by an inverse Fourier transformation of all these responses. The presence of a soil with an arbitrary resistivity and permittivity is accurately taken into account. The analysis sheds some new light on the understanding of the effects which take place at the higher frequencies
    IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications 06/1995; · 1.67 Impact Factor
  • W. Xiong, F.P. Dawalibi
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    ABSTRACT: The frequency and time domain performance of a typical substation grounding system subjected to a lightning strike is described and discussed. The computed scalar potentials, electric fields and magnetic fields are presented graphically as a function of spatial coordinate, as a function of time and as a function of both. First, a double exponential lightning surge current is injected into the center of a square ground grid. This same surge current is then injected at one corner of the grid. The response of the grounding system to the frequency domain electromagnetic spectrum of this signal is computed by a frequency domain electromagnetic field analysis software package. Once all the frequency responses have been computed, the temporal and spatial distributions of the electromagnetic fields inside and near the substation are obtained by an inverse Fourier transformation of all these responses. The results are compared with some well known low frequency results and to published work in this area. These results indicate that the performance of the grounding system is significantly dependent on frequency and on the point of impact of the lightning strike
    IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery 08/1994; · 1.52 Impact Factor
  • F.P. Dawalibi, W. Xiong
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: When lightning strikes an electric substation, large currents generated by the stroke flow in the aboveground structures and grounding system and dissipate in the soil. The electromagnetic fields generated by such high currents may cause damage to equipment and may be dangerous to personnel working nearby. In this paper, the frequency and time domain performance of a substation subjected to a lightning strike is described and discussed. The computed scalar potentials, electric fields and magnetic fields are presented graphically as a function of spatial coordinates, as a function of time and as a function of both. Two cases are considered. The first case examines the substation grounding system only, while the second case includes an aboveground structure as well. It is believed that the results of the second case have not been published before. A double exponential lightning surge current is injected at one corner of the substation. The response of the grounding system to the frequency domain electromagnetic spectrum of this signal is computed by a frequency domain electromagnetic field analysis software package. The temporal and spatial distributions of the electromagnetic fields inside and near the substation are obtained by an inverse Fourier transformation of all these responses. The presence of a soil with an arbitrary resistivity and permittivity is accurately taken account. Analysis sheds some new light on understanding of the effects which take place at the higher frequencies
    Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Technical Conference, 1994. Conference Record, Papers Presented at the 1994 Annual Meeting, 1994 IEEE; 06/1994
  • F.P. Dawalibi, W. Xiong, J. Ma
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    ABSTRACT: It is shown that significant inaccuracies can occur when the ANSI/IEEE Std 80 method for calculating foot resistances is applied in substations covered by a thin layer of crushed rock or similar covering layers. In particular, the errors obtained by using the infinite series expression of the foot resistance are consistently larger than those produced by the simplified expression for clean and contaminated surface layers
    IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery 02/1993; · 1.52 Impact Factor