Eloisa Lamas

Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas, Barcino, Catalonia, Spain

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Publications (13)70.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND:: Second-line bismuth-containing quadruple therapy is complex and frequently induces adverse effects. A triple rescue regimen containing levofloxacin is a potential alternative; however, resistance to quinolones is rapidly increasing. AIM:: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a second-line triple-regimen-containing levofloxacin in patients whose Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment failed and to assess whether the efficacy of the regimen decreases with time. METHODS:: Design: Prospective multicenter study. Patients: In whom treatment with a regimen comprising a proton-pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin had failed. Intervention: Levofloxacin (500 mg bid), amoxicillin (1 g bid), and omeprazole (20 mg bid) for 10 days. Outcome: Eradication was confirmed using the C-urea breath test 4 to 8 weeks after therapy. Compliance/tolerance: Compliance was determined through questioning and recovery of empty medication envelopes. Incidence of adverse effects was evaluated by means of a questionnaire. RESULTS:: The study sample comprised 1000 consecutive patients (mean age, 49±15 y, 42% men, 33% peptic ulcer) of whom 97% took all medications correctly. Per-protocol and intention-to-treat eradication rates were 75.1% (95% confidence interval, 72%-78%) and 73.8% (95% confidence interval, 71%-77%). Efficacy (intention-to-treat) was 76% in the year 2006, 68% in 2007, 70% in 2008, 76% in 2009, 74% in 2010, and 81% in 2011. In the multivariate analysis, none of the studied variables (including diagnosis and year of treatment) were associated with success of eradication. Adverse effects were reported in 20% of patients, most commonly nausea (7.9%), metallic taste (3.9%), myalgia (3.1%), and abdominal pain (2.9%). CONCLUSIONS:: Ten-day levofloxacin-containing therapy is an encouraging second-line strategy, providing a safe and simple alternative to quadruple therapy in patients whose previous standard triple therapy has failed. The efficacy of this regimen remains stable with time.
    Journal of clinical gastroenterology 05/2012; · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 04/2012; 104(4):220-1. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 04/2012; 104(4):220-221. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In some cases, Helicobacter pylori infection persists even after three eradication treatments. To evaluate the efficacy of an empirical fourth-line rescue regimen with rifabutin in patients with three eradication failures. Design: Multicentre, prospective study. Patients: In whom the following three treatments had consecutively failed: first (PPI + clarithromycin + amoxicillin); second (PPI + bismuth + tetracycline + metronidazole); third (PPI + amoxicillin + levofloxacin). Intervention: A fourth regimen with rifabutin (150 mg b.d.), amoxicillin (1 g b.d.) and a PPI (standard dose b.d.) was prescribed for 10 days. Outcome: Eradication was confirmed by (13) C-urea breath test 4-8 weeks after therapy. Compliance and tolerance: Compliance was determined through questioning and recovery of empty medication envelopes. Adverse effects were evaluated using a questionnaire. One-hundred patients (mean age 50 years, 39% men, 31% peptic ulcer/69% functional dyspepsia) were included. Eight patients did not take the medication correctly (in six cases due to adverse effects). Per-protocol and intention-to-treat eradication rates were 52% (95% CI = 41-63%) and 50% (40-60%). Adverse effects were reported in 30 (30%) patients: nausea/vomiting (13 patients), asthenia/anorexia (8), abdominal pain (7), diarrhoea (5), fever (4), metallic taste (4), myalgia (4), hypertransaminasemia (2), leucopenia (<1,500 neutrophils) (2), thrombopenia (<150,000 platelets) (2), headache (1) and aphthous stomatitis (1). Myelotoxicity resolved spontaneously in all cases. Even after three previous H. pylori eradication failures, an empirical fourth-line rescue treatment with rifabutin may be effective in approximately 50% of the cases. Therefore, rifabutin-based rescue therapy constitutes a valid strategy after multiple previous eradication failures with key antibiotics, such as clarithromycin, metronidazole, tetracycline and levofloxacin.
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 02/2012; 35(8):941-7. · 4.55 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2011; 140(5). · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Triple therapy including a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin (PPI-CA) is the first-choice treatment used for H. pylori eradication. The efficacy of this treatment is declining of late, and alternative therapies are currently under evaluation. To evaluate the efficacy, safety and compliance of a triple therapy with a PPI, amoxicillin and levofloxacin (PPI-LA)--replacing clarithromycin--for the eradication of H. pylori. The study included 135 patients (65% women), mean age 53 years, with dyspeptic symptoms and H. pylori infection proven by a positive urease rapid test, histological analysis, or C13-urea breath test. Diagnosis: non-investigated dyspepsia 48.9%, functional dyspepsia 36.3%, and ulcerative dyspepsia 14.8%. Treatment was indicated with a proton pump inhibitor at usual doses, amoxicillin 1 g, and levofloxacin 500 mg, administered jointly during breakfast and dinner for 10 days. We studied the performance of this triple therapy and its effects using a questionnaire, and effectiveness by the negativity of the C13-urea breath test after 6-8 weeks after treatment discontinuation. Per protocol, we compared the effectiveness of PPI-LA with a control group of 270 patients treated with PPI-CA for 10 days. 130 patients (96.2%) could complete the treatment and follow-up protocol. Effectiveness (intention to treat) was 71.8% (97/135) and 74.6% (per protocol) (97/130). Sixteen patients (11.8%) had well-tolerated adverse effects, except for 5 subjects (3.7%) who dropped out. PPI-CA was effective (per protocol) in 204 patients out of 270 (75.5%) in the control group. Triple therapy with a PPI, amoxicillin and levofloxacin for 10 days is a well-tolerated treatment that is easy to comply with; however it has low efficiency - less than 80% - and is not recommended as a first-choice treatment for H. pylori eradication. Similar results were obtained with the classic triple therapy using a PPI, clarithromycin and amoxicillin.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 07/2009; 101(6):395-8, 399-402. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: triple therapy including a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin (PPI-CA) is the first-choice treatment used for H. pylori eradication. The efficacy of this treatment is declining of late, and alternative therapies are currently under evaluation. Objectives: to evaluate the efficacy, safety and compliance of a triple therapy with a PPI, amoxicillin and levofloxacin (PPI-LA) - replacing clarithromycin - for the eradication of H. pylori. Methods: the study included 135 patients (65% women), mean age 53 years, with dyspeptic symptoms and H. pylori infection proven by a positive urease rapid test, histological analysis, or C13-urea breath test. Diagnosis: non-investigated dyspepsia 48.9%, functional dyspepsia 36.3%, and ulcerative dyspepsia 14.8%. Treatment was indicated with a proton pump inhibitor at usual doses, amoxicillin 1 g, and levofloxacin 500 mg, administered jointly during breakfast and dinner for 10 days. We studied the performance of this triple therapy and its effects using a questionnaire, and effectiveness by the negativity of the C13-urea breath test after 6-8 weeks after treatment discontinuation. Per protocol, we compared the effectiveness of PPI-LA with a control group of 270 patients treated with PPI-CA for 10 days. Results: 130 patients (96.2%) could complete the treatment and follow-up protocol. Effectiveness (intention to treat) was 71.8% (97/135) and 74.6% (per protocol) (97/130). Sixteen patients (11.8%) had well-tolerated adverse effects, except for 5 subjects (3.7%) who dropped out. PPI-CA was effective (per protocol) in 204 patients out of 270 (75.5%) in the control group. Conclusions: triple therapy with a PPI, amoxicillin and levofloxacin for 10 days is a well-tolerated treatment that is easy to comply with; however it has low efficiency - less than 80% - and is not recommended as a first-choice treatment for H. pylori eradication. Similar results were obtained with the classic triple therapy using a PPI, clarithromycin and amoxicillin.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 06/2009; 101(6):395-402. · 1.65 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 01/2009; 32(3):251-251. · 12.82 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 04/2008; 134(4). · 12.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Quadruple therapy is generally recommended as second-line therapy after Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication failure. However, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs with a complex scheme, is associated with a relatively high incidence of adverse effects, and bismuth salts are not available worldwide anymore. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a triple second-line levofloxacin-based regimen in patients with H. pylori eradication failure. Design: Prospective multicenter study. Patients: in whom a first treatment with proton pump inhibitor-clarithromycin-amoxicillin had failed. Intervention: A second eradication regimen with levofloxacin (500 mg b.i.d.), amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d.), and omeprazole (20 mg b.i.d.) was prescribed for 10 days. Outcome: Eradication was confirmed with (13)C-urea breath test 4-8 wk after therapy. Compliance with therapy was determined from the interview and the recovery of empty envelopes of medications. Incidence of adverse effects was evaluated by means of a specific questionnaire. Three hundred consecutive patients were included. Mean age was 48 yr, 47% were male, 38% had peptic ulcer, and 62% functional dyspepsia. Almost all (97%) patients took all the medications correctly. Per-protocol and intention-to-treat eradication rates were 81% (95% CI 77-86%) and 77% (73-82%). Adverse effects were reported in 22% of the patients, mainly including nausea (8%), metallic taste (5%), abdominal pain (3%), and myalgias (3%); none of them were severe. Ten-day levofloxacin-based rescue therapy constitutes an encouraging second-line strategy, representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous proton pump inhibitor-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure, being simple and safe.
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology 02/2008; 103(1):71-6. · 9.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eradication therapy with proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin and amoxicillin fails in a considerable number of cases. A rescue therapy still fails in more than 20% of the cases. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a third-line levofloxacin-based regimen in patients with two consecutive Helicobacter pylori eradication failures. Design: Prospective multicenter study. Patients: In whom a first treatment with omeprazole-clarithromycin-amoxicillin and a second with omeprazole-bismuth-tetracycline-metronidazole (or ranitidine bismuth citrate with these antibiotics) had failed. Intervention: A third eradication regimen with levofloxacin (500 mg b.i.d.), amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d.), and omeprazole (20 mg b.i.d.) was prescribed for 10 days. Outcome: Eradication was confirmed with 13C-urea breath test 4-8 wk after therapy. One-hundred patients were initially included, and nine were lost for follow-up. All patients but five took all the medications correctly. Per-protocol and intention-to-treat eradication rates were 66% (95% CI = 56-75%) and 60% (50-70%). Adverse effects were reported in 25% of the patients, mainly including metallic taste (8%), nausea (8%), myalgia/arthralgia (5%), and diarrhea (4%); none of them were severe. Levofloxacin-based rescue therapy constitutes an encouraging empirical third-line strategy after multiple previous H. pylori eradication failures with key antibiotics such as amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and tetracycline.
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology 03/2006; 101(2):243-7. · 9.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peptic ulcer disease, with or without complications, is more common in patients with liver cirrhosis than in the general population. Factors associated with portal hypertension are involved in its pathogenesis. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with liver cirrhosis and the general population is similar. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the etiology of bleeding peptic ulcer disease in patients with liver cirrhosis. We studied 35 patients with liver cirrhosis and gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroduodenal ulcers or erosions (group A), 125 noncirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroduodenal ulcers or erosions (group B), and 70 patients with liver cirrhosis who were admitted to hospital without gastrointestinal bleeding (group C). All patients were questioned about NSAID consumption, including aspirin, during the week prior to hospital admission. NSAID consumption was reported by 15 patients (42.8%) in group A, 102 patients (58.2%) in group B, and 6 patients (8.5%) in group C. Statistically significant differences were obtained when the results for group A were compared with those for group C. NSAID consumption in patients with liver cirrhosis without gastrointestinal bleeding was low (8.5%) and was much lower than that observed in patients with cirrhosis admitted to hospital for bleeding due to gastroduodenal ulcers or erosions (42.8%). As occurs in the general population, NSAIDs play a significant role in the pathogenesis of bleeding due to peptic ulcer disease in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.
    Gastroenterología y Hepatología 02/2006; 29(1):11-4. · 0.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Peptic ulcer disease, with or without complications, is more common in patients with liver cirrhosis than in the general population. Factors associated with portal hypertension are involved in its pathogenesis. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with liver cirrhosis and the general population is similar. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the etiology of bleeding peptic ulcer disease in patients with liver cirrhosis. Patients and methods We studied 35 patients with liver cirrhosis and gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroduodenal ulcers or erosions (group A), 125 noncirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroduodenal ulcers or erosions (group B), and 70 patients with liver cirrhosis who were admitted to hospital without gastrointestinal bleeding (group C). All patients were questioned about NSAID consumption, including aspirin, during the week prior to hospital admission. Results NSAID consumption was reported by 15 patients (42.8%) in group A, 102 patients (58.2%) in group B, and 6 patients (8.5%) in group C. Statistically significant differences were obtained when the results for group A were compared with those for group C. Conclusions NSAID consumption in patients with liver cirrhosis without gastrointestinal bleeding was low (8.5%) and was much lower than that observed in patients with cirrhosis admitted to hospital for bleeding due to gastroduodenal ulcers or erosions (42.8%). As occurs in the generalpopulation, NSAIDs play a significant role in the athogenesis of bleeding due to peptic ulcer disease in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.
    Gastroenterología y Hepatología. 01/2006; 29(1).