Dan Farine

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (147)409.21 Total impact

  • Mary Higgins, Dan Farine
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    ABSTRACT: Worldwide, the rate of delivery by cesarean section is increasing, such that the cesarean section rate is often greater than 30%. The reasons for this increase are many, but a major reason for this change is related to our relatively poor ability to manage labor. This review attempts to cover the issues that contribute to this. Issues regarding definition, assessment and management of labor progress as well as critical times in labor will be examined. Types of partograms are discussed as well as the maternal and fetal factors that influence progress of labor. To be able to care for women in labor, it is important to be aware of limitations of management and how best to overcome these.
    Expert Review of Obstetrics &amp Gynecology 01/2014; 8(1).
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the intravenous dose of carbetocin required to produce effective uterine contraction in 90% of females (ED90) undergoing elective Cesarean delivery (CD) under spinal anesthesia. We conducted a double-blind dose-finding study of carbetocin. Forty females undergoing elective CD received carbetocin intravenously upon delivery of the fetus. The dose of carbetocin for each patient was determined according to a biased-coin up-and-down sequential allocation scheme designed to cluster doses close to ED90. The initial dose was 10 μg, with increments/decrements of 5 μg. The anesthesiologist, obstetrician, and patient were blinded to the dose. The obstetrician assessed the uterine tone at one-minute intervals for five minutes after carbetocin administration. In case of unsatisfactory tone, additional uterotonics were administered. The primary outcome was requirement for additional intraoperative uterotonics. Secondary outcomes were postoperative requirement for additional uterotonics within 24 hr of delivery, estimated blood loss and side effects. The ED90 of carbetocin was 14.8 μg (95% confidence interval 13.7 to 15.8). Thirty-seven patients (92.5%) had adequate uterine tone with no requirement of additional intraoperative uterotonics. Two patients (5%) required postoperative uterotonics within 24 hr. The overall mean (SD) estimated blood loss was 786 (403) mL and the overall incidence of hypotension (decrease in systolic blood pressure ≥ 20% baseline) was 37.5%. Based on our study, the ED90 of carbetocin at elective CD is less than one-fifth the currently recommended dose of 100 μg. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT-01651130).
    Canadian Anaesthetists? Society Journal 11/2013; · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the intravenous dose of carbetocin required to produce effective uterine contraction in 95% of women (ED95) undergoing elective Cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. One hundred and twenty term pregnant women at low risk for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) undergoing elective Cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to receive carbetocin in doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100 μg iv upon delivery of the fetus. The obstetrician evaluated the efficacy of uterine tone as satisfactory or unsatisfactory, and in case of unsatisfactory tone, additional uterotonics were administered as per routine institutional practice. The primary outcome measure was satisfactory uterine tone at two minutes after carbetocin administration, and the secondary outcomes were the estimated blood loss, need for additional uterotonic agents within 24 hr, and side effects. Overall satisfactory uterine tone at two minutes was observed in 94.2% (113/120) of the women, and there was no difference across the different study groups. It was not possible to calculate the ED95 of carbetocin due to the even distribution of women with unsatisfactory uterine tone at two minutes across all dose groups (P = 0.60). Additional uterotonics within 24 hr were required in 13% (16/120) of the women. Side effects were similar across all dose groups, with an overall 42.5% incidence of hypotension following the administration of carbetocin. In women at low risk for PPH undergoing elective Cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia, carbetocin is similarly effective in doses of 20-100 μg. There is a high incidence of hypotension associated with carbetocin in these doses. Further dose-finding studies are warranted, including doses lower than 20 μg. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01428817).
    Canadian Anaesthetists? Society Journal 11/2013; 60(11):1054-1060. · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article reviews the use and effectiveness of emergency cerclage for women who present with a dilated cervix in the second trimester of pregnancy and seeks to identify predictors of favorable emergency cerclage outcomes. We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Library for the period January 1995 to April 2012 and used the terms "emergency cerclage," "emergency stitch," "rescue cerclage," and "rescue stitch." Thirty-four studies in which transvaginal emergency cervical cerclage was performed in women with a dilated cervix were identified and included. Predictors of poor outcome were prolapsed membranes, evidence of intra-amniotic or systemic infection, symptomatic presentation, cervical dilatation greater than 3 cm, or cerclage after 22 weeks. According to observational and limited randomized controlled trials, the cerclage group did significantly better than the bed-rest group in mean randomization-to-delivery interval, preterm delivery before 34 weeks, and compound neonatal morbidity. The current data suggest that emergency cerclage is associated with a longer latency period and, most often, with better pregnancy outcomes when compared with bed rest. Many of the predictors of adverse outcomes appear to be associated with evidence of inflammation or infection. Target Audience: Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physicians Learning Objectives: After completing this CME activity, physicians should be better able to review the use and evaluate the effectiveness of emergency cerclage for women who present with a dilated cervix in the second trimester, to identify predictors of favorable emergency cerclage outcomes, and to compare emergency cerclage versus bed rest.
    Obstetrical & gynecological survey 05/2013; 68(5):379-88. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 04/2013; 35(4):303-4.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To determine whether obstetrical patients in a large tertiary-care centre receive counselling, are aware of the proper actions in relation to fetal movement (on the basis of discussion with caregivers, educational pamphlet, or access to any information), have an understanding similar to that prescribed in the SOGC guidelines, and seek timely assessment in the event of decreased fetal movement. Methods: We surveyed a convenience sample of pregnant women (N = 206) at term between July and October 2011. After collecting demographic and provider information, we assessed patient familiarity with fetal movement counting, including sources, timeliness, counting protocols, and response to decreased fetal movement. We calculated incidence rates, measures of association, and statistical significance by chi-square testing. Results: The majority of patients (147/206 = 71.4%) relied on their care provider for information, and 44.1% of patients were very familiar with fetal movement counting. A majority, 57.8% (119), received timely information, although 8.1% (27) received information late in pregnancy or not at all. Quite consistently amongst subgroups (low vs. high-risk pregnancy, nullipara vs. multipara, patients of varied providers), one third (34.7%, 70/202) of patients had no knowledge or incorrect knowledge of the SOGC guidelines, 35.1% (71/202) had knowledge of fetal movement counting and what to do, while 30.2% (61/202) who knew how to monitor fetal movements did not know how to respond to decreased movement. Conclusion: Timely intervention for decreased fetal movement results in a substantial reduction in the rate of stillbirth. Only one third of our patients were both informed and would have sought further investigation for decreased movement. Reinforcing the significance of fetal movement counting in scholarly publications can remind care providers about the importance of informing all patients about this simple, inexpensive, and successful monitoring protocol.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 02/2013; 35(2):111-8.
  • Dan Farine, Debra Shepherd
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To advocate for the use of a common classification system for Caesarean section across Canada. Options: A variety of clinical parameters for classification were considered. Outcomes: Consideration of a common system for classifying Caesarean section. Evidence: Studies published in English from 1976 to December 2011 were retrieved through searches of Medline and PubMed, using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (Caesarean section, vaginal birth after Caesarean, classification). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the web sites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and the web sites of national and international medical specialty societies. Values: The studies reviewed were classified according to criteria described by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, and the recommendation for practice ranked according to this classification (Table 1). Sponsors: The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Recommendation Modified Robson criteria should be used to enable comparison of Caesarean section rates and indications. (III-B).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 10/2012; 34(10):976-9.
  • Shay Porat, David Baud, Dan Farine
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Risk factors related to obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) are known for singleton deliveries. No study to date has described the rate and risk factors involved in twin deliveries. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study (1985-2010) of all vaginal twin and singleton deliveries in a single tertiary center. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for OASIS at delivery was estimated using the logistic regression model. RESULTS: The study comprised 1,538 and 91,312 patients with vaginal twin and singleton delivery, respectively. Twenty twin (1.27 %) and 2,331 (2.55 %) singleton deliveries were complicated with OASIS. The following OASIS-associated risk factors were shared by both populations: nulliparity [twins adjusted OR 5.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.7-20.9; singletons adjusted OR 3.9, 95 % CI 3.5-4.4), occipitoposterior (OP) position (twins adjusted OR 3.00, 95 % CI 1.1-8.0; singletons adjusted OR 1.6, 95 % CI 1.3-2.00), birthweight (for each 100 g) (twin adjusted OR 1.1, 95 % CI 1.0-1.2; singletons adjusted OR 1.07, 95 % CI 1.06-1.08), and instrumental delivery (twins adjusted OR 4.3, 95 % CI 1.2-15.4, singletons adjusted OR 2.4, 95 % CI 2.2-2.6). CONCLUSIONS: Risk factors of nulliparity, OP position, large fetal size, and instrumental delivery were shared by both twin and singleton deliveries. These data will be useful in counselling women carrying twins who intend to deliver vaginally.
    International Urogynecology Journal 09/2012; · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The primary objective of our study was to determine the minimum intravenous dose of carbetocin required to produce adequate uterine contraction in 95% of women (effective dose [ED](95)) undergoing elective Cesarean delivery (CD). Eighty term pregnant women with low risk for postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) undergoing elective CD under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated to receive carbetocin intravenously in doses of 80 μg, 90 μg, 100 μg, 110 μg, or 120 μg upon delivery. The consultant obstetrician evaluated the efficacy of the patient's uterine tone as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. In case of unsatisfactory uterine tone, additional uterotonics were administered as per routine institutional practice. Side effects were monitored during the study period. The main outcome measure was satisfactory uterine tone at two minutes after carbetocin administration. Satisfactory uterine tone was obtained in 70 subjects (87%) within the dose range of 80-120 μg of carbetocin. It was not possible to calculate the ED(95) of carbetocin due to the even distribution of women with satisfactory uterine tone across all dose groups (P = 0.99). Similarly, the side effects were similar across all dose groups. There was a high overall incidence of hypotension (55%) following the administration of carbetocin. In women at low risk for PPH undergoing elective CD, carbetocin doses of 80-120 μg are similarly effective. There is a high incidence of hypotension associated with carbetocin in these doses, and further studies with doses lower than 80 μg are warranted to assess the balance of efficacy and side effects. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01262742).
    Canadian Anaesthetists? Society Journal 06/2012; 59(8):751-7. · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To review the existing data regarding varicella zoster virus infection (chickenpox) in pregnancy, interventions to reduce maternal complications and fetal infection, and antepartum and peripartum management. The maternal and fetal outcomes in varicella zoster infection were reviewed, as well as the benefit of the different treatment modalities in altering maternal and fetal sequelae. Evidence: Medline was searched for articles and clinical guidelines published in English between January 1970 and November 2010. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table). 1. Varicella immunization is recommended for all non-immune women as part of pre-pregnancy and postpartum care. (II-3B) 2. Varicella vaccination should not be administered in pregnancy. However, termination of pregnancy should not be advised because of inadvertent vaccination during pregnancy. (II-3D) 3. The antenatal varicella immunity status of all pregnant women should be documented by history of previous infection, varicella vaccination, or varicella zoster immunoglobulin G serology. (III-C) 4. All non-immune pregnant women should be informed of the risk of varicella infection to themselves and their fetuses. They should be instructed to seek medical help following any contact with a person who may have been contagious. (II-3B) 5. In the case of a possible exposure to varicella in a pregnant woman with unknown immune status, serum testing should be performed. If the serum results are negative or unavailable within 96 hours from exposure, varicella zoster immunoglobulin should be administered. (III-C) 6. Women who develop varicella infection in pregnancy need to be made aware of the potential adverse maternal and fetal sequelae, the risk of transmission to the fetus, and the options available for prenatal diagnosis. (II-3C) 7. Detailed ultrasound and appropriate follow-up is recommended for all women who develop varicella in pregnancy to screen for fetal consequences of infection. (III-B) 8. Women with significant (e.g., pneumonitis) varicella infection in pregnancy should be treated with oral antiviral agents (e.g., acyclovir 800 mg 5 times daily). In cases of progression to varicella pneumonitis, maternal admission to hospital should be seriously considered. Intravenous acyclovir can be considered for severe complications in pregnancy (oral forms have poor bioavailability). The dose is usually 10 to 15 mg/kg of BW or 500 mg/m² IV every 8 h for 5 to 10 days for varicella pneumonitis, and it should be started within 24 to 72 h of the onset of rash. (III-C) 9. Neonatal health care providers should be informed of peripartum varicella exposure in order to optimize early neonatal care with varicella zoster immunoglobulin and immunization. (III-C) Varicella zoster immunoglobulin should be administered to neonates whenever the onset of maternal disease is between 5 days before and 2 days after delivery. (III-C).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 03/2012; 34(3):287-92.
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    ABSTRACT: The primary goal of this study was to determine the ultrasonographic signs of asynclitic and transverse head positioning. In addition, we compared the performance of intrapartum ultrasound to vaginal digital examination. 150 women were evaluated by 2D transabdominal and translabial ultrasound (US) to detect the asynclitic and deep transverse positions. Transvaginal sterile digital examinations were performed immediately after each intrapartum US assessments, the examinations were repeated at intervals of 45-90 minutes. Examiners were blinded to each other's findings (clinical or sonographic). Data were reviewed and analyzed by an independent reviewer. The efficacy of digital examination was significantly lower than US evaluation for the detection of either transverse position or asynclitism. The most frequent transverse position was the left one, while the most frequent asynclitism was the anterior one. Digital pelvic examination for detection of fetal head transverse position during labor is inferior to US, especially in the deep transverse positioning, where caput succedaneum occurs and reduces the diagnostic accuracy of vaginal digital examination. The US examination leads to early detection of persistent transverse position allowing for earlier timing and optimal technique for the operative vaginal delivery. We describe two signs for diagnosing asynclitism. The "squint sign" and the "sunset of thalamus and cerebellum signs" are two simple US signs allowing detection of anterior and posterior asynclitism.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 12/2011; 25(5):508-12. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Invasive placentation (placenta accreta, increta, or percreta) presents significant challenges at Caesarean section. Caesarean hysterectomy in such circumstances may result in massive blood loss despite surgical expertise. We reviewed two divergent surgical approaches: planned Caesarean hysterectomy versus a "conserving surgery" in which the placenta is left in situ after Caesarean section. We conducted a single-centre retrospective review of all patients who delivered with invasive placentation between 2000 and 2009. We included only patients with antenatally diagnosed invasive placentation and planned mode of delivery. Twenty-six patients met the inclusion criteria. Caesarean hysterectomy was planned in 16 patients and conserving surgery in 10. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were comparable in the two groups. Four of 10 patients initially treated by conservative surgery required a subsequent hysterectomy for severe vaginal bleeding, coagulopathy, or sepsis. No pregnancies were subsequently reported in the conserving surgery group. An initial conserving surgical procedure is an option in patients with extensive invasive placentation, but it requires further monitoring for potential complications and carries a high subsequent hysterectomy rate.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 10/2011; 33(10):1005-10.
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    ABSTRACT: Assisted reproductive technologies have been widely used over the past 30 years, and 1% to 4% of births worldwide are products of these technologies. However, adverse health outcomes related to assisted reproductive technologies, including cerebral palsy, have been reported. We extracted and reviewed all relevant studies cited by Medline from 1996 to 2010 evaluating the role of assisted reproductive technologies as a causative factor for cerebral palsy and poor long-term neurologic outcome. The research suggests that multiple pregnancy, preterm delivery, and babies small for gestational age are factors in the development of cerebral palsy. The vanishing embryo syndrome may also play a role. We review the evidence for these potentially causative factors, as well as their implications for embryo transfer policies.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 10/2011; 33(10):1038-43.
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    ABSTRACT: To elucidate factors pertinent to the course and outcome of H1N1 infection in pregnancy. We conducted a retrospective chart review of H1N1-affected pregnant patients at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Ontario. All women who tested positive for H1N1 from June 1, 2009, to December 5, 2009, were identified. Records were reviewed to determine pregnancy status. Information from clinic and hospital charts of pregnant patients was gathered using data collection forms previously approved by the Mount Sinai Hospital Research Ethics Board. Of 42 patients, 12 were inpatients and 30 were outpatients. Sixty percent of patients (25/42) presented in the third trimester, 33% (14/42) had comorbidities, and 69% were afebrile and therefore did not have a condition that met the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's definition of influenza-like illness. Antiviral agents were administered promptly in most patients, but delays resulted in one third of patients being treated more than 48 hours from the onset of symptoms. Seventy-one percent (30/42) did not require hospitalization, and 58% of hospitalized patients (7/12) were admitted for reasons unrelated to H1N1. Although one quarter of hospitalized patients (3/12) had delivered at the time of discharge, no deliveries occurred because of H1N1. Most patients (91%) delivered at term. One half of the deliveries (51%) were by Caesarean section, but none of these were because of H1N1 infection. Most of the infants (88%) were appropriately grown, and none were admitted to the NICU because of H1N1. Infection with H1N1 in pregnant women has the propensity to result in significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, and requires vigilance in assessment and prompt treatment. In contrast to reports published to date, our cohort experienced a largely uncomplicated course of illness, with minimal fetal and maternal impact in most instances.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 07/2011; 33(7):698-704.
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the relationship between delivery mode and postpartum depression at 6 weeks following hospital discharge. A prospective cohort study. Eleven hospitals in Ontario, Canada. A total of 2560 women ≥16 years of age who delivered singleton, live infants at term. Women completed a questionnaire in hospital and 74% (n = 1897) participated in a structured telephone interview 6 weeks after discharge. Additional data were extracted from labour and delivery records. Generalised estimating equations (GEEs) were used to investigate factors associated with postpartum depression. Women were screened for depression at 6 weeks following hospital discharge using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). A score of ≥12 on the EPDS was used as a measure of the primary outcome, depression. Mode of delivery was not independently associated with postpartum depression, and did not factor into the main-effects model. The multivariable analysis identified 11 predictor variables for depression: young maternal age (OR 5.27; 95% CI 2.73-10.15); maternal hospital readmission (OR 3.02; 95% CI 1.46-6.24); non-initiation of breastfeeding (OR 2.02; 95% CI 0.99-4.11); good, fair, or poor self-reported postpartum health (OR 1.82; 95% CI 1.19-2.80); urinary incontinence (OR 1.79; 95% CI 1.06-3.03); multiparity (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.22-2.08); low mental health functioning (OR 1.20; 95% CI 1.15-1.25); low subjective social status (OR 1.16; 95% CI 1.02-1.33); high number of unmet learning needs in hospital (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.03-1.22); low social support (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.03-1.09); and low physical health functioning (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.003-1.055). An exploratory interaction model revealed that caesarean section was associated with higher odds of becoming depressed in Canadian-born women, but that in women born outside of Canada it was associated with a lower risk of becoming depressed. Delivery mode had no significant impact on the development of postpartum depression in the main-effects model. However, it may interact with place of birth and other unmeasured factors to create a risk for depression.
    BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 07/2011; 118(8):966-77. · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The recent SOGC guidelines allow for selective vaginal delivery of breech presentations, following an eight-year period during which vaginal breech delivery was discouraged based on the results of the Term Breech Trial (TBT). We sought to determine the effect of publication of this guideline on the acceptance of vaginal breech delivery by obstetricians and to correlate obstetricians' attitudes with actual practice. A survey was sent to all obstetricians practising in five teaching hospitals in Toronto exploring their attitudes towards, and comfort with, vaginal breech delivery in various clinical situations. We correlated these with their graduation year in relation to the publication of the TBT. We also reviewed the obstetrical database of the largest teaching hospital in Toronto to see if these attitudes correlated with actual practice. The vaginal breech delivery rate, which was declining prior to publication of the TBT, plummeted after it. Our survey found that most practitioners (50% to 80%) would be willing to provide vaginal breech delivery in defined conditions, with more experienced obstetricians being more comfortable with offering vaginal breech delivery. However, despite these attitudes, the vaginal breech delivery rate during the period surveyed was only 3% (6/195). In the eight years between publication of the TBT and the new guidelines, very few vaginal breech deliveries were performed. Our survey indicates that most obstetricians have accepted the new guidelines; however, it seems that actual practice is lagging behind. The recent SOGC guidelines seem to have changed attitudes, but without changes in training and practical support, it seems unlikely that the trend for very few vaginal breech deliveries to be performed will be reversed.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 05/2011; 33(5):437-42.
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    Claire Jones, Crystal Chan, Dan Farine
    Canadian Medical Association Journal 01/2011; 183(7):815-8. · 6.47 Impact Factor
  • Yoav Yinon, Dan Farine, Mark H Yudin
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    ABSTRACT: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common intrauterine infection and the leading infectious cause of sensorineural hearing loss and mental retardation. This article reviews the issues that relate to the diagnosis and management of this disease, detailing the points that led to the recent published guidelines by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. A MEDLINE/Cochrane search of CMV infection, pregnancy, and prenatal diagnosis found 195 studies between 1980 and 2010. Of these, we examined 59 relevant studies. The probability of intrauterine transmission following primary infection is 30% to 40%, but only 1% after secondary infection. About 10% to 15% of congenitally infected infants will have symptoms at birth, and 20% to 30% of them will die, whereas 5% to 15% of the asymptomatic infected neonates will develop sequelae later. Children with congenital CMV infection following first trimester infection are more likely to have central nervous system sequelae, whereas infection acquired in the third trimester has a high rate of intrauterine transmission but a favorable outcome. The prenatal diagnosis of fetal CMV infection should be based on amniocentesis performed 7 weeks after the presumed time of infection and after 21 weeks of gestation. Sonographic findings often imply poor prognosis, but their absence does not guarantee a normal outcome. The value of quantitative determination of CMV DNA in the amniotic fluid is not yet confirmed. The effectiveness of prenatal therapy for fetal CMV is not yet proven, although CMV-specific hyperimmune globulin may be beneficial. Routine serologic screening of pregnant women or newborns has never been recommended by any public health authority. TARGET AUDIENCE: Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Family Physicians. LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After completion of this educational activity, the obstetrician/gynecologist should be better able to evaluate the principles of prenatal diagnosis of congenital CMV infection so doctors will be familiar with the tests and procedures needed, in order to reach a diagnosis of congenital CMV; to assess the natural history and outcome of congenital CMV infection enabling obstetricians to counsel prenatally pregnant women with CMV; and to analyze the prognostic markers for fetal CMV, so managing physicians will be able to predict more accurately the outcomes of fetuses infected by CMV.
    Obstetrical & gynecological survey 11/2010; 65(11):736-43. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ObjectiveTo review the evidence and provide recommendations for the counselling and management of obese parturients.OutcomesOutcomes evaluated include the impact of maternal obesity on the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, and perinatal morbidity and mortality.EvidenceLiterature was retrieved through searches of Statistics Canada, Medline, and The Cochrane Library on the impact of obesity in pregnancy on antepartum and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetrical anaesthesia, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to April 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies.ValuesThe evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal Fetal Medicine and Clinical Practice Obstetric Committees of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.Benefits, Harms, and CostsImplementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase recognition of the issues clinicians need to be aware of when managing obese women in pregnancy, improve communication and consultation amongst the obstetrical care team, and encourage federal and provincial agencies to educate Canadians about the values of entering pregnancy with as healthy a weight as possible.
    International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics. 08/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: To review the evidence and provide recommendations for the counselling and management of obese parturients. Outcomes: Outcomes evaluated include the impact of maternal obesity on the provision of antenatal and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Literature was retrieved through searches of Statistics Canada, Medline, and The Cochrane Library on the impact of obesity in pregnancy on antepartum and intrapartum care, maternal morbidity and mortality, obstetrical anaesthesia, and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to April 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the Maternal Fetal Medicine and Clinical Practice Obstetric Committees of the SOGC under the leadership of the principal authors, and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Implementation of the recommendations in this guideline should increase recognition of the issues clinicians need to be aware of when managing obese women in pregnancy, improve communication and consultation amongst the obstetrical care team, and encourage federal and provincial agencies to educate Canadians about the values of entering pregnancy with as healthy a weight as possible.
    International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 08/2010; 110(2):167-73. · 1.41 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
409.21 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1992–2013
    • University of Toronto
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      • • Department of Medical Imaging
      • • Department of Anesthesia
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2012
    • JVS Toronto
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2010
    • Kingston College
      Kingston, New York, United States
  • 2009
    • Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 1990–2009
    • Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2008
    • Santa Maria Goretti Hospital
      Littoria, Latium, Italy
  • 1997–2007
    • Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
      • • Department of Medical Imaging
      • • Department of Evaluative Clinical Sciences
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 1998
    • McMaster University
      • Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • 1996
    • National Maternity Hospital
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 1991–1993
    • Mount Sinai Hospital
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1989
    • Columbia College
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1988
    • New York Presbyterian Hospital
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Gracie Square Hospital, New York, NY
      New York City, New York, United States