Daniel Weintraub

University of Pennsylvania, Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States

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Publications (159)847.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Prescribing practice patterns and factors associated with treatment changes in older patients initiating antipsychotic treatment for the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia is not well known. The objective of this study is to study 90-day prescribing practice patterns across the three most commonly prescribed antipsychotics. This is a retrospective study using national data from the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The study included patients older than 65 years diagnosed with dementia who began outpatient treatment with an antipsychotic medication between 2005 and 2008. Patients were followed for 90 days from their antipsychotic start. The primary event of interest was changing to another psychotropic medication. Cumulative incidence of treatment change was determined with antipsychotic discontinuation and death as competing risks. Covariate-adjusted hazard ratios for treatment change were determined using competing risk regression models. During the study period, 15,435 patients initiated an atypical antipsychotic; 14,791 started olanzapine, quetiapine, or risperidone. Over half (55%) of the patients discontinued index treatment within 90 days, 36% continued, 3% died while on index treatment, and 6% changed to another psychotropic medication. Compared with quetiapine, the adjusted hazard of treatment change was higher by 43% (p = 0.005) for olanzapine and by 12% (p = 0.08) for risperidone. The higher hazard of treatment change with olanzapine suggests patients either responded worse to or experienced more adverse events with olanzapine compared with quetiapine. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 03/2015; DOI:10.1002/gps.4281 · 3.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and correlates of cognitive impairment (CI) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in early, untreated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Both CI and NPS are common in PD and impact disease course and quality of life. However, limited knowledge is available about cognitive abilities and NPS. Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) is a multi-site study of early, untreated PD patients and healthy controls (HCs), the latter with normal cognition. At baseline, participants were assessed with a neuropsychological battery and for symptoms of depression, anxiety, impulse control disorders (ICDs), psychosis, and apathy. Baseline data of 423 PD patients and 196 HCs yielded no between-group differences in demographic characteristics. Twenty-two percent of PD patients met the PD-recommended screening cutoff for CI on the Montral Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), but only 9% met detailed neuropsychological testing criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI)-level impairment. The PD patients were more depressed than HCs (P < 0.001), with twice as many (14% vs. 7%) meeting criteria for clinically significant depressive symptoms. The PD patients also experienced more anxiety (P < 0.001) and apathy (P < 0.001) than HCs. Psychosis was uncommon in PD (3%), and no between-group difference was seen in ICD symptoms (P = 0.51). Approximately 10% of PD patients in the early, untreated disease state met traditional criteria of CI, which is a lower frequency compared with previous studies. Multiple dopaminergic-dependent NPS are also more common in these patients compared with the general population, but others associated with dopamine replacement therapy are not or are rare. Future analyses of this cohort will examine biological predictors and the course of CI and NPS. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
    Movement Disorders 03/2015; DOI:10.1002/mds.26170 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous functional neuroimaging studies in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with impulse control disorders (ICDs) demonstrated dysfunction of the reward network, although the extent of anatomical changes is unclear. The aim of this study was to measure brain cortical thickness and subcortical volumes, and to assess their relationship with presence and severity of symptoms, in PD patients with and without ICDs. We studied 110 PD patients (N = 58 with ICDs) and 33 healthy controls (all negative for ICDs) who underwent an extensive neurological, neuropsychological, and behavioral assessment as well as structural 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Between-group differences in brain cortical thickness and subcortical volumes, assessed with the FreeSurfer 5.1 tool, were analyzed. In patients with ICDs, we found significant cortical thinning in fronto-striatal circuitry, specifically in the right superior orbitofrontal, left rostral middle frontal, bilateral caudal middle frontal region, and corpus callosum, as well as volume reduction in the right accumbens and increase in the left amygdala. Finally, we observed a positive association relationship between severity of impulsive symptoms and left rostral middle frontal, inferior parietal, and supramarginal areas. These results support the involvement of both reward and response inhibition networks in PD patients with ICDs. Moreover, their severity is associated with alterations in brain regions linked with reward and top-down control networks. Increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying impulsive and compulsive behaviors might help improve therapeutic strategies for these important disorders. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
    Movement Disorders 02/2015; DOI:10.1002/mds.26154 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing evidence suggests that genetic factors play a role in the variability associated with cognitive performance in Parkinson's disease (PD). Mutations in the LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of monogenic PD; however, the cognitive profile of LRRK2-related PD is not well-characterized. A cohort of 1,447 PD patients enrolled in the PD Cognitive Genetics Consortium was screened for LRRK2 mutations and completed detailed cognitive testing. Associations between mutation carrier status and cognitive test scores were assessed using linear regression models. LRRK2 mutation carriers (n = 29) demonstrated better performance on the Mini Mental State Examination (P = 0.03) and the Letter-Number Sequencing Test (P = 0.005). A smaller proportion of LRRK2 carriers were demented (P = 0.03). Our cross-sectional study demonstrates better performance on certain cognitive tests, as well as lower rates of dementia in LRRK2-related PD. Future longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether LRRK2 mutation carriers exhibit slower cognitive decline. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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    ABSTRACT: Background There is compelling evidence from over 60 epidemiological studies that smoking significantly reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). In general, those who currently smoke cigarettes, as well as those with a past history of such smoking, have a reduced risk of PD compared to those who have never smoked. Recently it has been suggested that a cardinal nonmotor sensory symptom of PD, olfactory dysfunction, may be less severe in PD patients who smoke than in PD patients who do not, in contrast to the negative effect of smoking on olfaction described in the general population.Methods We evaluated University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) scores from 323 PD patients and 323 controls closely matched individually on age, sex, and smoking history (never, past, or current).ResultsPatients exhibited much lower UPSIT scores than did the controls (P < 0.0001). The relative decline in dysfunction of the current PD smokers was less than that of the never- and past-PD smokers (respective Ps = 0.0005 and 0.0019). Female PD patients outperformed their male counterparts by a larger margin than did the female controls (3.66 vs. 1.07 UPSIT points; respective Ps < 0.0001 and 0.06). Age-related declines in UPSIT scores were generally present (P < 0.0001). No association between the olfactory measure and smoking dose, as indexed by pack-years, was evident.ConclusionsPD patients who currently smoke do not exhibit the smoking-related decline in olfaction observed in non-PD control subjects who currently smoke. The physiological basis of this phenomenon is yet to be defined. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 12/2014; DOI:10.1002/mds.26126 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Parkinson Anxiety Scale is a new scale developed to measure anxiety severity in Parkinson's disease specifically. It consists of three dimensions: persistent anxiety, episodic anxiety, and avoidance behavior. This study aimed to assess the measurement properties of the scale while controlling for the rater (self- vs. clinician-rated) effect. The Parkinson Anxiety Scale was administered to a cross-sectional multicenter international sample of 362 Parkinson's disease patients. Both patients and clinicians rated the patient's anxiety independently. A many-facet Rasch model design was applied to estimate and remove the rater effect. The following measurement properties were assessed: fit to the Rasch model, unidimensionality, reliability, differential item functioning, item local independency, interrater reliability (self or clinician), and scale targeting. In addition, test–retest stability, construct validity, precision, and diagnostic properties of the Parkinson Anxiety Scale were also analyzed. A good fit to the Rasch model was obtained for Parkinson Anxiety Scale dimensions A and B, after the removal of one item and rescoring of the response scale for certain items, whereas dimension C showed marginal fit. Self versus clinician rating differences were of small magnitude, with patients reporting higher anxiety levels than clinicians. The linear measure for Parkinson Anxiety Scale dimensions A and B showed good convergent construct with other anxiety measures and good diagnostic properties. Parkinson Anxiety Scale modified dimensions A and B provide valid and reliable measures of anxiety in Parkinson's disease that are comparable across raters. Further studies are needed with dimension C. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 12/2014; DOI:10.1002/mds.26111 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment is one of the earliest, most common, and most disabling non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus, routine screening of global cognitive abilities is important for the optimal management of PD patients. Few global cognitive screening instruments have been developed for or validated in PD patients. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Dementia Rating Scale-2 (DRS-2) have been used extensively for cognitive screening in both clinical and research settings. Determining how to convert the scores between instruments would facilitate the longitudinal assessment of cognition in clinical settings and the comparison and synthesis of cognitive data in multicenter and longitudinal cohort studies. The primary aim of this study was to apply a simple and reliable algorithm for the conversion of MoCA to MMSE scores in PD patients. A secondary aim was to apply this algorithm for the conversion of DRS-2 to both MMSE and MoCA scores. The cognitive performance of a convenience sample of 360 patients with idiopathic PD was assessed by at least two of these cognitive screening instruments. We then developed conversion scores between the MMSE, MoCA, and DRS-2 using equipercentile equating and log-linear smoothing. The conversion score tables reported here enable direct and easy comparison of three routinely used cognitive screening assessments in PD patients. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 11/2014; DOI:10.1002/mds.26062 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Impulse control disorders (ICDs), including compulsive gambling, buying, sexual behavior, and eating, are a serious and increasingly recognized psychiatric complication in Parkinson's disease (PD). Other impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs) have been described in PD, including punding (stereotyped, repetitive, purposeless behaviors) and dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS; compulsive PD medication overuse). ICDs have been most closely related to the use of dopamine agonists (DAs), perhaps more so at higher doses; in contrast, DDS is primarily associated with shorter-acting, higher-potency dopaminergic medications, such as apomorphine and levodopa. Possible risk factors for ICDs include male sex, younger age and younger age at PD onset, a pre-PD history of ICDs, and a personal or family history of substance abuse, bipolar disorder, or gambling problems. Given the paucity of treatment options and potentially serious consequences, it is critical for PD patients to be monitored closely for development of ICDs as part of routine clinical care. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 10/2014; 30(2). DOI:10.1002/mds.26016 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment, including dementia, is common in Parkinson's disease (PD). The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) has been recommended as a screening tool for Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), with values below 26 indicative of possible dementia. Using a detailed neuropsychological battery, we examined the range of cognitive impairment in PD patients with an MMSE score of 26 or higher. In this multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study, we performed neuropsychological testing in a sample of 788 PD patients with MMSE scores of 26 or higher. Evaluation included tests of global cognition, executive function, language, memory, and visuospatial skills. A consensus panel reviewed results for 342 subjects and assigned a diagnosis of no cognitive impairment, mild cognitive impairment, or dementia. Sixty-seven percent of the 788 subjects performed 1.5 standard deviations below the normative mean on at least one test. On eight of the 15 tests, more than 20% of subjects scored 1.5 standard deviations or more below the normative mean. Greatest impairments were found on Hopkins Verbal Learning and Digit Symbol Coding tests. The sensitivity of the MMSE to detect dementia was 45% in a subset of participants who underwent clinical diagnostic procedures. A remarkably wide range of cognitive impairment can be found in PD patients with a relatively high score on the MMSE, including a level of cognitive impairment consistent with dementia. Given these findings, clinicians must be aware of the limitations of the MMSE in detecting cognitive impairment, including dementia, in PD. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 09/2014; 29(10). DOI:10.1002/mds.25924 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment is a common and disabling problem in Parkinson disease (PD) that is not well understood and is difficult to treat. Identification of genetic variants that influence the rate of cognitive decline or pattern of early cognitive deficits in PD might provide a clearer understanding of the etiopathogenesis of this important nonmotor feature.
    JAMA Neurology 09/2014; 71(11). DOI:10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.1455 · 7.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) significantly impacts both patients' and spouses' emotional and physical health. However, despite the importance of social relationships for wellbeing, few studies have examined relationship quality and their correlates in individuals with PD and their partners. Specifically, no known studies have examined the association between benefit finding, or the experience of personal growth and other positive changes in the face of a stressor, and perceived marital quality. To address these gaps in the field, 25 married couples participated in a cross-sectional, pilot study. Patients were veterans diagnosed with idiopathic PD receiving care at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center. Each patient and spouse independently completed self-reported measures of sociodemographics, physical and mental wellbeing, caregiver burden, marital quality, and perceived benefits associated with having PD. Actor-partner interdependence models revealed that, after adjusting for covariates, greater perceived benefits from either having PD or living with a spouse with PD was associated with greater marital quality, both for that individual and their partner. Thus, perceiving positive consequences, such as personal growth, as a result of personally having PD or living with a spouse with PD is related to greater marital quality for both members of the marital dyad. Findings may inform individual and couples-based interventions that address the value of benefit finding and incorporate other techniques of positive reappraisal. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
    Journal of Family Psychology 09/2014; 28(5). DOI:10.1037/a0037847 · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The discovery of novel plasma-based biomarkers could lead to new approaches in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we explore the role of plasma apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) as a risk marker for PD and evaluate the influence of APOA1 promoter variation on plasma ApoA1 levels. Plasma ApoA1 and the single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs670, were assayed in a discovery cohort (cohort 1) of 301 PD patients, 80 normal controls (NCs), and 165 subjects with other neurodegenerative diseases, as well as a cohort (cohort 2) of 158 PD patients from a second clinical site. Additionally, rs670 was genotyped in a third cohort of 1,494 PD and 925 NC subjects from both clinical sites. Compared to both normal and disease controls, PD patients have lower plasma ApoA1 (P < 0.001 for both comparisons). Moreover, in PD patients, plasma ApoA1 levels are correlated with genotype at the APOA1 promoter polymorphism, rs670. Specifically, lower plasma ApoA1 levels were found in rs670 major allele (G) homozygotes in both cohort 1 (P = 0.009) and in a replication cohort (cohort 2; n = 158 PD patients; P = 0.024). Finally, evaluating rs670 genotype frequencies in 1,930 PD cases versus 997 NCs, the rs670 GG genotype shows a trend toward association (odds ratio: 1.1; P = 0.10) with PD. Our results are compatible with a model whereby circulating ApoA1 levels may be useful in risk-stratifying subjects for the development of PD, with higher ApoA1 levels suggesting relative protection. Future studies evaluating modulation of ApoA1 as a novel therapeutic strategy in PD are warranted. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 09/2014; DOI:10.1002/mds.26022 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective:To evaluate the course and predictors of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) and cognition in patients with de novo Parkinson disease (PD).Methods:Cross-sectional study of the cohort of de novo, untreated (at enrollment) patients with PD and healthy controls (HCs) from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative. Participants have serial assessments of global cognition and symptoms of depression, anxiety, psychosis, impulse control disorders (ICDs), sleep and wakefulness, apathy, and fatigue. Available data up to 24 months of follow-up were included.Results:The available sample size was as follows: baseline (PD = 423, HCs = 196), 12 months (PD = 261, HCs = 145), and 24 months (PD = 96, HCs = 83). Patients with PD experienced more depression, fatigue, apathy, and anxiety than HCs at all time points, and apathy (p = 0.001) and psychosis (p = 0.003) increased over time in patients with PD. Approximately two-thirds of patients with PD who screened positive for depression at any given visit were not taking an antidepressant. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment score decreased significantly over time in patients with PD (p < 0.001), but the change was comparable to that in HCs. At the 24-month visit, 44% of patients had been on dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) for at least 1 year, and this group reported more incident ICDs (p = 0.009) and excessive daytime sleepiness (p = 0.03).Conclusion:Multiple NPS are more common in de novo, untreated patients with PD compared with the general population, but they also remain relatively stable in early disease, while global cognition slightly deteriorates. In contrast, initiation of DRT is associated with increasing frequency of several other NPS.
    Neurology 08/2014; 83(12). DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000000801 · 8.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson disease (PD) are common and can be difficult to manage. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy and tolerability of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, for the treatment of ICDs in PD.METHODS: Patients with PD (n = 50) and an ICD were enrolled in an 8-week, randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled study of naltrexone 50-100 mg/d (flexible dosing). The primary outcome measure was response based on the Clinical Global Impression-Change score, and the secondary outcome measure was change in symptom severity using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS) ICD score.RESULTS: Forty-five patients (90%) completed the study. The Clinical Global Impression-Change response rate difference favoring naltrexone in completers was 19.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] -8.7% to 44.2%). While this difference was not significant (odds ratio = 1.6, 95% CI 0.5-5.2, Wald χ(2) [df] = 0.5 [1], p = 0.5), naltrexone treatment led to a significantly greater decrease in QUIP-RS ICD score over time compared with placebo (regression coefficient for interaction term in linear mixed-effects model = -7.37, F[df] = 4.3 [1, 49], p = 0.04). The estimated changes in QUIP-RS ICD scores from baseline to week 8 were 14.9 points (95% CI 9.9-19.9) for naltrexone and 7.5 points (95% CI 2.5-12.6) for placebo.CONCLUSIONS: Naltrexone treatment was not efficacious for the treatment of ICDs in PD using a global assessment of response, but findings using a PD-specific ICD rating scale support further evaluation of opioid antagonists for the treatment of ICD symptoms in PD.CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class I evidence that in patients with PD and an ICD, naltrexone does not significantly increase the probability of achieving response. However, the study lacked the precision to exclude an important difference in response rates.
    Neurology 07/2014; DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000000729 · 8.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment is a common occurrence in Parkinson's disease (PD), although the severity and specific presentation varies across patients. Initial deficits, including mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), may remain stable or in many cases, may progress over variable lengths of time to Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). As there are currently no marketed treatments for milder forms of cognitive impairment, an opportunity exists to define the path for therapeutic development in this area. In the absence of a well-defined path for the approval of therapies that target PD-MCI, pharmaceutical companies are unlikely to pursue this indication. In order to move forward and improve the quality of life for PD patients, it is imperative for the field to have consensus on the definition of PD-MCI, the best instruments to measure cognitive decline, and a strategy for future clinical trials.
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    ABSTRACT: Background: A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety communication in August 2011 warned that citalopram was associated with a dose dependent risk of QT prolongation and recommended dose restriction in patients over the age of 60 but did not provide data for this age group. Methods: CitAD was a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants were assigned to citalopram (target dose of 30 mg/day) or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. 186 people, 181 of whom were over the age of 60, having probable AD with clinically significant agitation were recruited from September 2009 to January 2013. After the FDA safety communication about citalopram, ECG was added to the required study procedures before enrollment and repeated at week 3 to monitor change in QTc interval. Forty-eight participants were enrolled after enhanced monitoring began. Results: Citalopram treatment was associated with a larger increase in QTc interval than placebo (difference in week 3 QTc adjusting for baseline QTc: 18.1 ms [95% CI: 6.1, 30.1]; p = 0.004). More participants in the citalopram group had an increase >= 30 ms from baseline to week 3 (7 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo; Fisher's exact p = 0.046), but only slightly more in the citalopram group met a gender-specific threshold for prolonged QTc (450 ms for males; 470 ms for females) at any point during follow-up (3 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo, Fisher's exact p = 0.611). One of the citalopram participants who developed prolonged QTc also displayed ventricular bigeminy. No participants in either group had a cardiovascular-related death. Conclusion: Citalopram at 30 mg/day was associated with improvement in agitation in patients with AD but was also associated with QT prolongation.
    PLoS ONE 07/2014; 9(6):e98426. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0098426 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Alzheimer's and Dementia 07/2014; 10(4):P926. DOI:10.1016/j.jalz.2014.07.146 · 17.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Existing anxiety rating scales have limited construct validity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). This study was undertaken to develop and validate a new anxiety rating scale, the Parkinson Anxiety Scale (PAS), that would overcome the limitations of existing scales. The general structure of the PAS was based on the outcome of a Delphi procedure. Item selection was based on a canonical correlation analysis and a Rasch analysis of items of the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) from a previously published study. Validation was done in a cross-sectional international multicenter study involving 362 patients with idiopathic PD. Patients underwent a single screening session in which the PAS was administered, along with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the HARS, and the BAI. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was administered to establish Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) diagnoses of anxiety and depressive disorders. The PAS is a 12-item observer or patient-rated scale with three subscales, for persistent, episodic anxiety and avoidance behavior. Properties for acceptability and reliability met predetermined criteria. The convergent and known groups validity was good. The scale has a satisfactory factorial structure. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve and Youden index of the PAS are higher than that of existing anxiety rating scales. The PAS is a reliable and valid anxiety measure for use in PD patients. It is easy and brief to administer, and has better clinimetric properties than existing anxiety rating scales. The sensitivity to change of the PAS remains to be assessed. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 07/2014; 29(8). DOI:10.1002/mds.25919 · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are a relatively recent addition to the behavioral spectrum of PD-related non-motor symptoms. Social and economic factors may play a role on the ICD phenotype of PD patients. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and characterize the clinical profile of ICDs in a sample of low-income, low-education PD patients with no social security benefits from a Latin American country. Methods: We included 300 consecutive PD patients and 150 control subjects. The presence of ICD and related disorders was assessed using a structured interview. After the interview and neurological evaluation were concluded, all subjects completed the Questionnaire for Impulsive-compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease-Rating Scale (QUIP-RS). Results: Regarding ICDs and related disorders (hobbyism-punding), 25.6% (n = 77) of patients in the PD group and 16.6% (n = 25) in the control group fulfilled criteria for at least one ICD or related disorder (p = 0.032). There was a statistically significant difference in the QUIP-RS mean score between PD and control subjects (5.6 +/- 9.7 and 2.7 +/- 4.21, p = 0.001). The most common ICD was compulsive eating for both PD (8.6%) and control (2.6%) groups. Conclusions: The results of this study confirm that for this population, symptoms of an ICD are significantly more frequent in PD subjects than in control subjects. Nevertheless, socioeconomic differences may contribute to a lower overall frequency and distinct pattern of ICDs in PD patients compared with what has been reported in other countries.
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 06/2014; 20(8). DOI:10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.05.014 · 4.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Consensus diagnostic criteria for multiple system atrophy consider dementia as a nonsupporting feature, despite emerging evidence demonstrating that cognitive impairments are an integral part of the disease. Cognitive disturbances in multiple system atrophy occur across a wide spectrum from mild single domain deficits to impairments in multiple domains and even to frank dementia in some cases. Frontal-executive dysfunction is the most common presentation, while memory and visuospatial functions also may be impaired. Imaging and neuropathological findings support the concept that cognitive impairments in MSA originate from striatofrontal deafferentation, with additional contributions from intrinsic cortical degeneration and cerebellar pathology. Based on a comprehensive evidence-based review, the authors propose future avenues of research that ultimately may lead to diagnostic criteria for cognitive impairment and dementia associated with multiple system atrophy. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society
    Movement Disorders 06/2014; 29(7). DOI:10.1002/mds.25880 · 5.63 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

5k Citations
847.42 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2015
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2014
    • University Hospital Donostia
      San Sebastián, Basque Country, Spain
  • 2011–2014
    • William Penn University
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2013
    • University of the Sciences in Philadelphia
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2012
    • Johns Hopkins Medicine
      • Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2008
    • Yale University
      • Department of Psychiatry
      New Haven, CT, United States
  • 2004–2005
    • Drexel University
      • Department of Psychology
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2000
    • University of Louisville
      Louisville, Kentucky, United States