D. Rizzo

University College London, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (79)136.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, HerMES, is a legacy program designed to map a set of nested fields totalling ~380 deg^2. Fields range in size from 0.01 to ~20 deg^2, using Herschel-SPIRE (at 250, 350 and 500 \mu m), and Herschel-PACS (at 100 and 160 \mu m), with an additional wider component of 270 deg^2 with SPIRE alone. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the re-processed optical and ultra-violet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multi-wavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The survey will detect of order 100,000 galaxies at 5\sigma in some of the best studied fields in the sky. Additionally, HerMES is closely coordinated with the PACS Evolutionary Probe survey. Making maximum use of the full spectrum of ancillary data, from radio to X-ray wavelengths, it is designed to: facilitate redshift determination; rapidly identify unusual objects; and understand the relationships between thermal emission from dust and other processes. Scientific questions HerMES will be used to answer include: the total infrared emission of galaxies; the evolution of the luminosity function; the clustering properties of dusty galaxies; and the properties of populations of galaxies which lie below the confusion limit through lensing and statistical techniques. This paper defines the survey observations and data products, outlines the primary scientific goals of the HerMES team, and reviews some of the early results.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 03/2012; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.
    Nature 01/2012; 485(7397):213-6. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the potential of submm-mm and submm-mm-radio photometric redshifts using a sample of mm-selected sources as seen at 250, 350 and 500 {\mu}m by the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. From a sample of 63 previously identified mm-sources with reliable radio identifications in the GOODS-N and Lockman Hole North fields 46 (73 per cent) are found to have detections in at least one SPIRE band. We explore the observed submm/mm colour evolution with redshift, finding that the colours of mm-sources are adequately described by a modified blackbody with constant optical depth {\tau} = ({\nu}/{\nu}0)^{\beta} where {\beta} = +1.8 and {\nu}0 = c/100 {\mu}m. We find a tight correlation between dust temperature and IR luminosity. Using a single model of the dust temperature and IR luminosity relation we derive photometric redshift estimates for the 46 SPIRE detected mm-sources. Testing against the 22 sources with known spectroscopic, or good quality optical/near-IR photometric, redshifts we find submm/mm photometric redshifts offer a redshift accuracy of |z|/(1+z) = 0.16 (< |z| >= 0.51). Including constraints from the radio-far IR correlation the accuracy is improved to |z|/(1 + z) = 0.15 (< |z| >= 0.45). We estimate the redshift distribution of mm-selected sources finding a significant excess at z > 3 when compared to ~ 850 {\mu}m selected samples.
    Monthly Notices of The Royal Astronomical Society - MON NOTIC ROY ASTRON SOC. 09/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: We present spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 68 Herschel sources detected at 5sigma at 250, 350 and 500um in the HerMES SWIRE-Lockman field. We explore whether existing models for starbursts, quiescent star-forming galaxies and active galactic nucleus dust tori are able to model the full range of SEDs measured with Herschel. We find that while many galaxies (~56 per cent) are well fitted with the templates used to fit IRAS, Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and Spitzer sources, for about half the galaxies two new templates are required: quiescent ('cirrus') models with colder (10-20K) dust and a young starburst model with higher optical depth than Arp 220. Predictions of submillimetre fluxes based on model fits to 4.5-24um data agree rather poorly with the observed fluxes, but the agreement is better for fits to 4.5-70um data. Herschel galaxies detected at 500um tend to be those with the highest dust masses. (1 data file).
    VizieR Online Data Catalog. 08/2011; 740:90002.
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    ABSTRACT: We examine the rest-frame far-infrared emission from powerful radio sources with 1.4-GHz luminosity densities of 25 ≤ log(L1.4/W Hz−1) ≤ 26.5 in the extragalactic Spitzer First Look Survey field. We combine Herschel/SPIRE flux densities with Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer infrared data to obtain total (m) infrared luminosities for these radio sources. We separate our sources into a moderate, 0.4 < z < 0.9, and a high, 1.2 < z < 3.0, redshift sub-sample and we use Spitzer observations of a z < 0.1 3CRR sample as a local comparison. By comparison to numbers from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Simulated Skies, we find that our moderate-redshift sample is complete and our high-redshift sample is 14 per cent complete. We constrain the ranges of mean star formation rates (SFRs) to be 3.4–4.2, 18–41 and 80–581 M⊙ yr−1 for the local, moderate- and high-redshift samples, respectively. Hence, we observe an increase in the mean SFR with increasing redshift which we can parametrize as ∼(1 + z)Q, where Q = 4.2 ± 0.8. However, we observe no trends of mean SFR with radio luminosity within the moderate- or high-redshift bins. We estimate that radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the high-redshift sample contribute 0.1–0.5 per cent to the total SFR density at that epoch. Hence, if all luminous starbursts host radio-loud AGN we infer a radio-loud phase duty cycle of 0.001–0.005.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 03/2011; 413(3):1777 - 1786. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present first results of a study of the submillimetre (submm) (rest-frame far-infrared) properties of z∼ 3 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and their lower redshift counterparts BX/BM galaxies, based on Herschel-SPIRE observations of the Northern field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS-N). We use stacking analysis to determine the properties of LBGs well below the current limit of the survey. Although LBGs are not detected individually, stacking the infrared luminous LBGs (those detected with Spitzer at 24 μm) yields a statistically significant submm detection with mean flux 〈S250〉= 5.9 ± 1.4 mJy confirming the power of SPIRE in detecting UV-selected high-redshift galaxies at submm wavelengths. In comparison, the Spitzer 24 μm detected BX/BM galaxies appear fainter with a stacked value of 〈S250〉= 2.7 ± 0.8 mJy. By fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) we derive median infrared luminosities, LIR, of 2.8 × 1012 L⊙ and 1.5 × 1011 L⊙ for z∼ 3 LBGs and BX/BMs, respectively. We find that LIR estimates derived from present measurements are in good agreement with those based on UV data for z∼ 2 BX/BM galaxies, unlike the case for z∼ 3 infrared luminous LBGs where the UV underestimates the true LIR. Although sample selection effects may influence this result we suggest that differences in physical properties (such as morphologies, dust distribution and extent of star-forming regions) between z∼ 3 LBGs and z∼ 2 BX/BMs may also play a significant role.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters 11/2010; 409(1):L7 - L12. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We study the dust properties of galaxies in the redshift range 0.1 ≲z≲ 2.8 observed by the Herschel Space Observatory in the field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North as part of the PACS Extragalactic Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) key programmes. Infrared (IR) luminosity (LIR) and dust temperature (Tdust) of galaxies are derived from the spectral energy distribution fit of the far-IR (FIR) flux densities obtained with the PACS and SPIRE instruments onboard Herschel. As a reference sample, we also obtain IR luminosities and dust temperatures of local galaxies at z < 0.1 using AKARI and IRAS data in the field of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compare the LIR–Tdust relation between the two samples and find that the median Tdust of Herschel-selected galaxies at z≳ 0.5 with LIR≳ 5 × 1010 L⊙ appears to be 2–5 K colder than that of AKARI-selected local galaxies with similar luminosities, and the dispersion in Tdust for high-z galaxies increases with LIR due to the existence of cold galaxies that are not seen among local galaxies. We show that this large dispersion of the LIR−Tdust relation can bridge the gap between local star-forming galaxies and high-z submillimetre galaxies (SMGs). We also find that three SMGs with very low Tdust (≲20 K) covered in this study have close neighbouring sources with similar 24-μm brightness, which could lead to an overestimation of FIR/(sub)millimetre fluxes of the SMGs.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 11/2010; 409(1):75 - 82. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 68 Herschel sources detected at 5σ at 250, 350 and 500 μm in the HerMES SWIRE-Lockman field. We explore whether existing models for starbursts, quiescent star-forming galaxies and active galactic nucleus dust tori are able to model the full range of SEDs measured with Herschel. We find that while many galaxies (∼56 per cent) are well fitted with the templates used to fit IRAS, Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and Spitzer sources, for about half the galaxies two new templates are required: quiescent (‘cirrus’) models with colder (10–20 K) dust and a young starburst model with higher optical depth than Arp 220. Predictions of submillimetre fluxes based on model fits to 4.5–24 μm data agree rather poorly with the observed fluxes, but the agreement is better for fits to 4.5–70 μm data. Herschel galaxies detected at 500 μm tend to be those with the highest dust masses.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 11/2010; 409(1):2 - 11. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver on-board Herschel has been carrying out deep extragalactic surveys, one of the aims of which is to establish spectral energy distributions of individual galaxies spanning the infrared/submillimetre (IR/SMM) wavelength region. We report observations of the IR/SMM emission from the Lockman North field and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey Field-North. Because galaxy images in the wavelength range covered by Herschel generally represent a blend with contributions from neighbouring galaxies, we present sets of galaxies in each field, especially free of blending at 250, 350 and 500 μm. We identify the cumulative emission of these galaxies and the fraction of the FIR cosmic background radiation they contribute. Our surveys reveal a number of highly luminous galaxies at redshift z≲ 3 and a novel relationship between IR and visible emission that shows a dependence on luminosity and redshift.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 11/2010; 409(1):66 - 74. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using Herschel Photodetector Array Camera (PACS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) observations of Lockman Hole-North and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) as part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) project, we explore the far-infrared (IR) properties of a sample of mid-IR-selected starburst-dominated ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z∼ 2. The selection of the sample is based on the detection of the stellar bump that appears in the spectral energy distribution of star-forming galaxies at 1.6 μm. We derive robust estimates of infrared luminosities (LIR) and dust temperatures (Td) of the population and find that while the luminosities in our sample span less than an order of magnitude (12.24 ≤ log(LIR/L⊙) ≤ 12.94), they cover a wide range of dust temperatures (25 ≤Td≤ 62 K). Galaxies in our sample range from those that are as cold as high-z submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) to those that are as warm as optically faint radio galaxies (OFRGs) and local ULIRGs. Nevertheless, our sample has median Td= 42.3 K, filling the gap between SMGs and OFRGs, bridging the two populations. We demonstrate that a significant fraction of our sample would be missed from ground-based (sub)mm surveys (850–1200 μm), showing that the latter introduce a bias towards the detection of colder sources. We conclude that Herschel observations confirm the existence of high-z ULIRGs warmer than SMGs, show that the mid-IR selection of high-z ULIRGs is not Td dependent, reveal a large dispersion in Td of high-z ULIRGs and provide the means to characterize the bulk of the ULIRG population, free from selection biases introduced by ground-based (sub)mm surveys.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2010; 409(1):22 - 28. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dusty, star forming galaxies contribute to a bright, currently unresolved cosmic far-infrared background. Deep Herschel-SPIRE images designed to detect and characterize the galaxies that comprise this background are highly confused, such that the bulk lies below the classical confusion limit. We analyze three fields from the HerMES programme in all three SPIRE bands (250, 350, and 500 microns); parameterized galaxy number count models are derived to a depth of ~2 mJy/beam, approximately 4 times the depth of previous analyses at these wavelengths, using a P(D) (probability of deflection) approach for comparison to theoretical number count models. Our fits account for 64, 60, and 43 per cent of the far-infrared background in the three bands. The number counts are consistent with those based on individually detected SPIRE sources, but generally inconsistent with most galaxy number counts models, which generically overpredict the number of bright galaxies and are not as steep as the P(D)-derived number counts. Clear evidence is found for a break in the slope of the differential number counts at low flux densities. Systematic effects in the P(D) analysis are explored. We find that the effects of clustering have a small impact on the data, and the largest identified systematic error arises from uncertainties in the SPIRE beam. Comment: Accepted for publication in MNRAS
    09/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the cross-identification and source photometry techniques used to process Herschel SPIRE imaging taken as part of the Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). Cross-identifications are performed in map-space so as to minimise source blending effects. We make use of a combination of linear inversion and model selection techniques to produce reliable cross-identification catalogues based on Spitzer MIPS 24 micron source positions. Testing on simulations and real Herschel observations show that this approach gives robust results for even the faintest sources S250~10 mJy. We apply our new technique to HerMES SPIRE observations taken as part of the science demostration phase of Herschel. For our real SPIRE observations we show that, for bright unconfused sources, our flux density estimates are in good agreement with those produced via more traditional point source detection methods (SussExtractor; Savage & Oliver et al. 2006) by Smith et al. 2010. When compared to the measured number density of sources in the SPIRE bands, we show that our method allows the recovery of a larger fraction of faint sources than these traditional methods. However this completeness is heavily dependant on the relative depth of the existing 24 micron catalogues and SPIRE imaging. Using our deepest multi-wavelength dataset in GOODS-N, we estimate that the use of shallow 24 micron in our other fields introduces an incompleteness at faint levels of between 20-40 per cent at 250 micron. Comment: Accepted for publication in MNRAS, 19 pages, 11 figures
    09/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We study the dust properties of galaxies in the redshift range 0.1<z<2.8 observed by the Herschel Space Observatory in the field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North as part of PEP and HerMES key programmes. Infrared (IR) luminosity (L_IR) and dust temperature (T_dust) of galaxies are derived from the spectral energy distribution (SED) fit of the far-infrared (FIR) flux densities obtained with PACS and SPIRE instruments onboard Herschel. As a reference sample, we also obtain IR luminosities and dust temperatures of local galaxies at z<0.1 using AKARI and IRAS data in the field of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compare the L_IR-T_dust relation between the two samples and find that: the median T_dust of Herschel-selected galaxies at z>0.5 with L_IR>5x10^{10} L_\odot, appears to be 2-5 K colder than that of AKARI-selected local galaxies with similar luminosities; and the dispersion in T_dust for high-z galaxies increases with L_IR due to the existence of cold galaxies that are not seen among local galaxies. We show that this large dispersion of the L_IR-T_dust relation can bridge the gap between local star-forming galaxies and high-z submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). We also find that three SMGs with very low T_dust (<20 K) covered in this study have close neighbouring sources with similar 24-\mum brightness, which could lead to an overestimation of FIR/(sub)millimeter fluxes of the SMGs. Comment: 9 pages, 6 figures, To appear in MNRAS
    09/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: The reliability of infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions to measure star formation rates in galaxies is investigated for a large sample of galaxies observed with the SPIRE and PACS instruments on Herschel as part of the HerMES project. We build flux-limited 250 micron samples of sources at redshift z<1, cross-matched with the Spitzer/MIPS and GALEX catalogues. About 60 % of the Herschel sources are detected in UV. The total IR luminosities, L_IR, of the sources are estimated using a SED-fitting code that fits to fluxes between 24 and 500 micron. Dust attenuation is discussed on the basis of commonly-used diagnostics: the L_IR/L_UV ratio and the slope, beta, of the UV continuum. A mean dust attenuation A_UV of ~ 3 mag is measured in the samples. L_IR/L_UV is found to correlate with L_IR. Galaxies with L_IR > 10 ^{11} L_sun and 0.5< z<1 exhibit a mean dust attenuation A_UV about 0.7 mag lower than that found for their local counterparts, although with a large dispersion. Our galaxy samples span a large range of beta and L_IR/L_UV values which, for the most part, are distributed between the ranges defined by the relations found locally for starburst and normal star-forming galaxies. As a consequence the recipe commonly applied to local starbursts is found to overestimate the dust attenuation correction in our galaxy sample by a factor ~2-3 . Comment: accepted for publication in MNRAS, Herschel special issue
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters 07/2010; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), is the Herschel Space Observatory`s submillimetre camera and spectrometer. It contains a three-band imaging photometer operating at 250, 350 and 500 microns, and an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) which covers simultaneously its whole operating range of 194-671 microns (447-1550 GHz). The SPIRE detectors are arrays of feedhorn-coupled bolometers cooled to 0.3 K. The photometer has a field of view of 4' x 8', observed simultaneously in the three spectral bands. Its main operating mode is scan-mapping, whereby the field of view is scanned across the sky to achieve full spatial sampling and to cover large areas if desired. The spectrometer has an approximately circular field of view with a diameter of 2.6'. The spectral resolution can be adjusted between 1.2 and 25 GHz by changing the stroke length of the FTS scan mirror. Its main operating mode involves a fixed telescope pointing with multiple scans of the FTS mirror to acquire spectral data. For extended source measurements, multiple position offsets are implemented by means of an internal beam steering mirror to achieve the desired spatial sampling and by rastering of the telescope pointing to map areas larger than the field of view. The SPIRE instrument consists of a cold focal plane unit located inside the Herschel cryostat and warm electronics units, located on the spacecraft Service Module, for instrument control and data handling. Science data are transmitted to Earth with no on-board data compression, and processed by automatic pipelines to produce calibrated science products. The in-flight performance of the instrument matches or exceeds predictions based on pre-launch testing and modelling: the photometer sensitivity is comparable to or slightly better than estimated pre-launch, and the spectrometer sensitivity is also better by a factor of 1.5-2. Comment: Accepted for publication in Astronomy & Astrophyics (Herschel first results special issue)
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 05/2010; 518(L3). · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Herschel Space Observatory enables us to accurately measure the bolometric output of starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) by directly sampling the peak of their far-infrared (IR) emission. Here we examine whether the spectral energy distribution (SED) and dust temperature of galaxies have strongly evolved since z~2.5. We use Herschel deep extragalactic surveys from 100 to 500um to compute total IR luminosities in galaxies down to the faintest levels, using PACS and SPIRE in the GOODS-North field (PEP and HerMES key programs). We show that measurements in the SPIRE bands can be used below the statistical confusion limit if information at higher spatial resolution is used to identify isolated galaxies whose flux is not boosted by bright neighbors. Below z~1.5, mid-IR extrapolations are correct for star-forming galaxies with a dispersion of only 40% (0.15dex), therefore similar to z~0 galaxies. This narrow distribution is puzzling when considering the range of physical processes that could have affected the SED of these galaxies. Extrapolations from only one of the 160um, 250um or 350um bands alone tend to overestimate the total IR luminosity. This may be explained by the lack of far-IR constraints around and above ~150um (rest-frame) on local templates. We also note that the dust temperature of luminous IR galaxies around z~1 is mildly colder by 10-15% than their local analogs and up to 20% for ULIRGs at z~1.6. Above z=1.5, distant galaxies are found to exhibit a substantially larger mid- over far-IR ratio, which could either result from stronger broad emission lines or warm dust continuum heated by a hidden AGN. Two thirds of the AGNs identified in the field with a measured redshift exhibit the same behavior as purely star-forming galaxies. Hence a large fraction of AGNs harbor star formation at very high SFR and in conditions similar to purely star-forming galaxies. Comment: Astronomy and Astrophysics, Herschel Special Issue, in press as a Letter; 5 pages
    05/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We present colours of sources detected with the Herschel/SPIRE instrument in deep extragalactic surveys of the Lockman Hole, Spitzer-FLS, and GOODS-N fields in three photometric bands at 250, 350 and 500 micrometers. We compare these with expectations from the literature and discuss associated uncertainties and biases in the SPIRE data. We identify a 500 micrometer flux limited selection of sources from the HerMES point source catalogue that appears free from neighbouring/blended sources in all three SPIRE bands. We compare the colours with redshift tracks of various contemporary models. Based on these spectral templates we show that regions corresponding to specific population types and redshifts can be identified better in colour-flux space. The redshift tracks as well as the colour-flux plots imply a majority of detected objects with redshifts at 1<z<3.5, somewhat depending on the group of model SEDs used. We also find that a population of S_250/S_350<0.8 at fluxes above 50 mJy as observed by SPIRE is not well represented by contemporary models and could consist of a mix of cold and lensed galaxies. Comment: 5 pages, 8 figures, for special Herschel issue
    05/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: Emission at far-infrared wavelengths makes up a significant fraction of the total light detected from galaxies over the age of Universe. Herschel provides an opportunity for studying galaxies at the peak wavelength of their emission. Our aim is to provide a benchmark for models of galaxy population evolution and to test pre-existing models of galaxies. With the Herschel Multi-tiered Extra-galactic survey, HerMES, we have observed a number of fields of different areas and sensitivity using the SPIRE instrument on Herschel. We have determined the number counts of galaxies down to ~20 mJy. Our constraints from directly counting galaxies are consistent with, though more precise than, estimates from the BLAST fluctuation analysis. We have found a steep rise in the Euclidean normalised counts at <100 mJy. We have directly resolved 15% of the infrared extra-galactic background at the wavelength near where it peaks. Comment: Astronomy and Astrophysics, Herschel Special Issue, in press as a Letter; 5 pages
    05/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We have carried out two extremely deep surveys with SPIRE, one of the two cameras on Herschel, at 250 microns, close to the peak of the far-infrared background. We have used the results to investigate the evolution of the rest-frame 250-micron luminosity function out to z=2. We find evidence for strong evolution out to a redshift of around 1 but evidence for at most weak evolution beyond this redshift. Our results suggest that a significant part of the stars and metals in the Universe today were formed at z<1.4 in spiral galaxies. Comment: Astronomy and Astrophysics, Herschel Special Issue, in press as a Letter; 5 pages
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201014675. 05/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: Local luminosity functions are fundamental benchmarks for high-redshift galaxy formation and evolution studies as well as for models describing these processes. Determining the local luminosity function in the submillimeter range can help to better constrain in particular the bolometric luminosity density in the local Universe, and Herschel offers the first opportunity to do so in an unbiased way by imaging large sky areas at several submillimeter wavelengths. We present the first Herschel measurement of the submillimeter 0<z<0.2 local luminosity function and infrared bolometric (8-1000 $\mu$m) local luminosity density based on SPIRE data from the HerMES Herschel Key Program over 14.7 deg^2. Flux measurements in the three SPIRE channels at 250, 350 and 500 \mum are combined with Spitzer photometry and archival data. We fit the observed optical-to-submillimeter spectral energy distribution of SPIRE sources and use the 1/V_{max} estimator to provide the first constraints on the monochromatic 250, 350 and 500 \mum as well as on the infrared bolometric (8-1000 \mum) local luminosity function based on Herschel data. We compare our results with modeling predictions and find a slightly more abundant local submillimeter population than predicted by a number of models. Our measurement of the infrared bolometric (8-1000 \mum) local luminosity function suggests a flat slope at low luminosity, and the inferred local luminosity density, 1.31_-0.21^+0.24 x 10^8 Lsun Mpc^-3, is consistent with the range of values reported in recent literature. Comment: Accepted for publication in the A&A Herschel Special Issue
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201014694. 05/2010;

Publication Stats

933 Citations
136.61 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2008–2011
    • Imperial College London
      • Department of Physics
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2005–2007
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      • Institut d'astrophysique spatiale (IAS)
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2003–2006
    • The Astronomical Observatory of Brera
      Merate, Lombardy, Italy