D G Kuhel

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, United States

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Publications (6)22.79 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a large family of proteins whose role is to translocate various substances across biological membranes. They include the Tangier disease protein ABC1, sulfonylurea receptors (SUR), multidrug resistance protein (MDR), and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR). In the current study, we investigated the involvement of ABC transporters in the regulation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or interferon (IFN)-gamma-induced interleukin (IL)-12 p40 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production, nitric oxide formation, as well as major histocompatibility complex II up-regulation in macrophages. The general ABC transporter inhibitor glibenclamide suppressed both IL-12 p40 and nitric oxide production. However, glibenclamide failed to affect the production of TNF-alpha. The selective ABC1 inhibitors 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid and sulfobromophthalein mimicked the suppressive effect of glibenclamide on IL-12 p40 production. On the other hand, both the MDR inhibitor verapamil and CFTR blocker 2,2'-iminodibenzoic acid failed to suppress the production of IL-12 p40. Furthermore, selective inhibitors and activators of SURs were without effect. In agreement with the pharmacological data, macrophages expressed mRNA for ABC1, but not SURs or CFTR. Intracellular levels of IL-12 p40 were decreased by glibenclamide, suggesting that glibenclamide does not affect IL-12 p40 secretion. The effect of glibenclamide did not involve an interference with the activation of the p38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases or c-Jun kinase. Glibenclamide also suppressed IFN-gamma-induced up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex II. Taken together, our results indicate that ABC proteins regulate LPS and/or IFN-gamma-induced macrophage activation.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 05/2002; 301(1):103-10. · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin 12 (IL-12) is a crucial cytokine in the regulation of T helper 1 vs. T helper 2 immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the endogenous purine nucleoside adenosine on the production of IL-12. In mouse macrophages, adenosine suppressed IL-12 production. Although the order of potency of adenosine receptor agonists suggested the involvement of A2a receptors, data obtained with A2a receptor-deficient mice showed that the adenosine suppression of IL-12 and even TNF-alpha production is only partly mediated by A2a receptor ligation. Studies with adenosine receptor antagonists or the adenosine uptake blocker dipyridamole showed that adenosine released endogenously also decreases IL-12. Although adenosine increases IL-10 production, the inhibition of IL-12 production is independent of the increased IL-10. The mechanism of action of adenosine was not associated with alterations of the activation of the p38 and p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinases or the phosphorylation of the c-Jun terminal kinase. Adenosine failed to affect steady-state levels of either IL-12 p35 or p40 mRNA, but augmented IL-10 mRNA levels. In summary, adenosine inhibits IL-12 production via various adenosine receptors. These results support the notion that adenosine-based therapies might be useful in certain autoimmune and/or inflammatory diseases.
    The FASEB Journal 11/2000; 14(13):2065-74. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polyamines are endogenous immunomodulatory molecules. Recent studies revealed that polyamines suppress the production of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the polyamines spermine, spermidine, and putrescine on the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40, IL-10, and interferon (IFN-gamma) in mouse peritoneal macrophages and spleen cell suspensions. Spermine, but not spermidine or putrescine, suppressed, in a concentration-dependent manner, the production of IL-12 p40 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. The effect of spermine was post-transcriptional, because steady-state levels of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNAs) for IL-12 (p35 and p40) were not affected. In contrast to its inhibitory effect on IL-12 p40, spermine (0.3-3 microM) augmented IL-10 production. The down-regulation of IL-12 p40 by spermine was independent of enhancement of IL-10 by this agent, for spermine retained its ability to suppress IL-12 production in peritoneal macrophages obtained from IL-10-deficient mice. The alterations in cytokine production by spermine did not involve an effect on early intracellular pathways of LPS signal transduction, including the p38 or p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, or the c-jun terminal kinase. In spleen cell suspensions, spermine suppressed the release of IFN-gamma induced either by LPS or anti-CD3 antibody. In summary, spermine exerts anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing IL-12 and IFN-gamma and by augmenting the production of IL-10.
    Shock 09/2000; 14(2):144-9. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extracellular purines, including adenosine and ATP, are potent endogenous immunomodulatory molecules. Inosine, a degradation product of these purines, can reach high concentrations in the extracellular space under conditions associated with cellular metabolic stress such as inflammation or ischemia. In the present study, we investigated whether extracellular inosine can affect inflammatory/immune processes. In immunostimulated macrophages and spleen cells, inosine potently inhibited the production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-12, macrophage-inflammatory protein-1alpha, and IFN-gamma, but failed to alter the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The effect of inosine did not require cellular uptake by nucleoside transporters and was partially reversed by blockade of adenosine A1 and A2 receptors. Inosine inhibited cytokine production by a posttranscriptional mechanism. The activity of inosine was independent of activation of the p38 and p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, the phosphorylation of the c-Jun terminal kinase, the degradation of inhibitory factor kappaB, and elevation of intracellular cAMP. Inosine suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production and mortality in a mouse endotoxemic model. Taken together, inosine has multiple anti-inflammatory effects. These findings, coupled with the fact that inosine has very low toxicity, suggest that this agent may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory/ischemic diseases.
    The Journal of Immunology 02/2000; 164(2):1013-9. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Immune cell activation releases ATP into the extracellular space. ATP-sensitive P2 purinergic receptors are expressed on immune cells and activation of these receptors alters immune cell function. Furthermore, ATP is metabolized by ectonucleotidases to adenosine, which has also been shown to alter cytokine production. In the present study, we investigated how extracellular ATP affects interleukin (IL)-12 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production in bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated murine peritoneal macrophages and we also examined whether extracellular ATP alters the production of the T helper 1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma. Pretreatment of the peritoneal macrophages with ATP or various ATP analogues decreased both IL-12 and TNF-alpha production induced by LPS (10 microgram ml(-1)). The effect of ATP was partially reversed by cotreatment with adenosine deaminase (0.1 - 1 u ml(-1)), suggesting that the suppressive effect of ATP on cytokine production is, in part, due to its degradation products. Immunoneutralization with an anti-IL-10 antibody demonstrated that although ATP increases IL-10 production, the inhibition of IL-12 and TNF-alpha production is independent of the increased IL-10. The effect of ATP was pretranslational, as it suppressed steady state levels of mRNAs for IL-12 (both p35 and p40). In spleen cells stimulated with either LPS (10 microgram ml(-1)) or anti-CD3 (2 microgram ml(-1)) antibody, ATP suppressed, in a concentration-dependent manner, the production of IFN-gamma. These results suggest that extracellular ATP has multiple anti-inflammatory effects and that release of ATP into the extracellular space may play a role in blunting the overactive immune response in autoimmune diseases.
    British Journal of Pharmacology 01/2000; 129(5):909-914. · 5.07 Impact Factor
  • Shock. 01/2000; 14(2):144-149.