C J Kelly

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Leinster, Ireland

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Publications (87)239.39 Total impact

  • Eilis McGovern · Cathal J Kelly ·

    BMJ (online) 10/2011; 343:d6862. DOI:10.1136/bmj.d6862 · 17.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Les patients cancéreux ont un risque augmenté d'évènements thromboemboliques veineux. Certaines substances utilisées lors de chimiothérapies ont également été associées au développement de thromboses. Les cas rapportés d'épisodes ischémiques artériels aigus chez des patients cancéreux sont rares. Méthodes Les patients opérés chirurgicalement pour une ischémie aigue associée à une tumeur maligne dans un centre hospitalo-universitaire étaient identifiés sur une période de 10 ans. Les caractéristiques démographiques des patients, les types de cancer, l'utilisation de chimiothérapies, le site de la thrombose, les traitements et les résultats étaient notés. Résultats Quatre cents dix-neuf patients étaient opérés pour une ischémie aigue artérielle. Parmi eux, 16 patients (3,8%) avaient un cancer associé. Les sites les plus fréquents de cancer étaient le tractus urogénital (n = 5) et les poumons (n = 5). Huit patients (50%) avaient été diagnostiqués de leur cancer récemment, et quatre (25%) de ces cancers étaient découverts fortuitement après l'épisode d'ischémie aigue. Quatre patients (25%) développaient une ischémie aigue lors d'une chimiothérapie. L'artère fémorale superficielle était le site le plus fréquent d'occlusion (50%), suivie par les artères brachiales (18%) et poplitées (12%). Tous les patients avaient une thrombo-embolectomie, mais deux (12%) patients nécessitaient un pontage secondaire. Six patients (37%) perdaient leur membre, et la mortalité intra-hospitalière était de 12%. L'histologie révélait que toutes les occlusions étaient dues à une maladie thromboembolique, sans cellule tumorale identifiée. Lors du suivi, 44% de patients étaient vivants à 1 an. Conclusion Le cancer et la chimiothérapie peuvent prédisposer les patients à l'ischémie aigue artérielle. Au contraire d'autres rapports qui retrouvaient que cet évènement était préterminal et mieux traité par des mesures palliatives, dans cette série, un diagnostic et une intervention précoces permettaient un sauvetage de membre et la survie du patient.
    Annales de Chirurgie Vasculaire 10/2011; 25(7):1016–1022. DOI:10.1016/j.acvfr.2012.11.002
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer patients have an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events. Certain chemotherapeutic agents have also been associated with the development of thrombosis. Reported cases of acute arterial ischemic episodes in cancer patients are rare. Patients who underwent surgery for acute limb ischemia associated with malignancy in a university teaching hospital over a 10-year period were identified. Patient demographics, cancer type, chemotherapy use, site of thromboembolism, treatment and outcome were recorded. Four hundred nineteen patients underwent surgical intervention for acute arterial ischemia, 16 of these patients (3.8%) had associated cancer. Commonest cancer sites were the urogenital tract (n = 5) and the lungs (n = 5). Eight patients (50%) had been recently diagnosed with cancer, and four (25%) of these cancers were incidental findings after presentation with acute limb ischemia. Four patients (25%) developed acute ischemia during chemotherapy. The superficial femoral artery was the most frequent site of occlusion (50%), followed by the brachial (18%) and popliteal (12%) arteries. All patients underwent thromboembolectomy, but two (12%) patients subsequently required a bypass procedure. Six patients (37%) had limb loss, and in-patient mortality was 12%. Histology revealed that all occlusions were due to thromboembolism, with no tumor cells identified. At follow-up, 44% of patients were found to be alive after 1 year. Cancer and chemotherapy can predispose patients to acute arterial ischemia. Unlike other reports that view this finding as a preterminal event most appropriately treated by palliative measures, in this series, early diagnosis and surgical intervention enabled limb salvage and patient survival.
    Annals of Vascular Surgery 08/2011; 25(7):954-60. DOI:10.1016/j.avsg.2011.06.002 · 1.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Down syndrome, or trisomy 21, has a characteristic constellation of clinical findings, including various congenital heart defects. We report a case of an adult male with Down syndrome who presented with a 3-week history of lower limb pain and swelling, attributed to cellulitis. Clinical and angiographic evaluation identified a below-knee mycotic pseudoaneurysm secondary to infective endocarditis. Surgical aneurysmal repair and revascularization were performed. Various management options are outlined in this report.
    Vascular 10/2010; 18(5):297-8. DOI:10.2310/6670.2010.00040 · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are both associated with excessive vascular calcification and elevated levels of inflammatory markers IL-6 and hsCRP. The recently identified Osteoprotegerin(OPG)/RANKL/TRAIL pathway has been implicated in vascular calcification, but data on levels in PAD and effect of co-existent DM are lacking. 4 groups of patients were recruited - 26 with PAD and DM, 35 with DM alone, 22 with PAD alone, and 21 healthy individuals. Serum OPG, RANKL, TRAIL, hsCRP and IL-6 were measured using commercial ELISA assays. Presence and severity of PAD was defined using ankle brachial index (ABI). Serum OPG (7.4±0.3 vs.5.8±0.2 pmol/l, p<0.0001), TRAIL (95.5±5.2 ng/ml vs. 76.2±4.4 ng/ml, p=0.006), hsCRP (2.6±0.3 vs. 1.8±0.3 mg/l, p=0.048), and IL-6 (4.1±0.4 vs. 2.9±0.4 pg/ml, p=0.06) were higher in patients with PAD. There was no difference in RANKL. Only OPG was significantly higher in PAD and DM (7.2±0.3 pmol/l) and PAD alone (7.7±0.4 pmol/l) compared to DM only (5.8±0.3 pmol/l) and healthy controls (5.6±0.4 pmol/l), p<0.01, but OPG was no higher in those with DM plus PAD versus those with PAD alone (p<0.3). Only OPG was associated with PAD severity, correlating negatively with ABI (r=-0.26, p=0.03), independent of age, gender, glycaemic status, hsCRP and IL-6. PAD is associated with higher serum OPG, regardless of the co-existence of DM. This finding, in addition to its correlation with severity of PAD, suggests that OPG may be a novel marker for the presence and severity of PAD, possibly by reflecting the degree of underlying vascular calcification.
    Thrombosis Research 10/2010; 126(6):e423-7. DOI:10.1016/j.thromres.2010.09.003 · 2.45 Impact Factor

  • Journal of Surgical Radiology 07/2010; 1(1):42-44. DOI:10.5299/jsurgrad.0101.A08
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    ABSTRACT: To avoid ischemic necrosis, compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency treated with decompression once identified. A potentially lethal, oxidant-driven reperfusion injury occurs after decompression. N-acetylcysteine is an antioxidant with the potential to attenuate the reperfusion injury. We asked whether N-acetylcysteine could preserve striated muscle contractility and modify neutrophil infiltration and activation after simulated compartment syndrome release. Fifty-seven rats were randomized to control, simulated compartment syndrome, and simulated compartment syndrome plus N-acetylcysteine groups. We isolated the rodent cremaster muscle on its neurovascular pedicle and placed it in a pressure chamber. Chamber pressure was elevated above critical closing pressure for 3 hours to simulate compartment syndrome. Experiments were concluded at three times: 1 hour, 24 hours, and 7 days after decompression of compartment syndrome. We assessed twitch and tetanic contractile function and tissue myeloperoxidase activity. Ten additional rats were randomized to control and N-acetylcysteine administration after which neutrophil respiratory burst activity was assessed. The simulated compartment syndrome decreased muscle contractility and increased muscle tissue myeloperoxidase activity compared with controls. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine preserved twitch and tetanic contractility. N-acetylcysteine did not alter neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) acutely but did reduce infiltration at 24 hours, even when given after decompression. N-acetylcysteine reduced neutrophil respiratory burst activity. N-acetylcysteine administration before or after simulated compartment syndrome preserved striated muscle contractility, apparently by attenuating neutrophil activation and the resultant oxidant injury. Our data suggest a potential role for N-acetylcysteine in the attenuation of muscle injury after release of compartment syndrome and possibly in the prophylaxis of compartment syndrome.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 03/2010; 468(8):2251-9. DOI:10.1007/s11999-010-1287-7 · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    Geraldine Maccarrick · Cathal Kelly · Ronan Conroy ·
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    ABSTRACT: Curriculum reform poses significant challenges for medical schools across the globe. This paper describes the reforms that took place at the medical school of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) between 2005 and 2008 and the institutional self review process that accompanied these reforms. Although fully accredited with the Irish Medical Council the RCSI sought additional detailed review of all aspects of its undergraduate medical program. Five medical educationalists were invited to visit the College in 2005 and again in 2008 to act as 'critical friends' and guide the self review using the World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) standards which had recently been adopted in Ireland. The process of institutional self review (as opposed to more high stakes accreditation) can bring about significant reform, especially when supported by a panel of 'critical friends' working alongside faculty to help guide and support sustained curriculum reform. The WFME standards continue to provide a useful framework to consider all medical education activities within a medical school engaged in continuous renewal. Adequate preparation for such reviews is critical to the success of such an undertaking and should be supported by a comprehensive communication strategy and project plan.
    Medical Teacher 01/2010; 32(5):e227-32. DOI:10.3109/0142159X.2010.482396 · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of endovascular stent grafts in the treatment of para-anastomotic aneurysms (PAAs) as an alternative to high-risk open surgical repair. We identified all patients with previous open aortic aneurysm repair who underwent infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at our institution from June 1998 to April 2007. Patient demographics, previous surgery, and operative complications were recorded. One hundred forty-eight patients underwent EVAR during the study period and 11 patients had previous aortic surgery. Of these 11 redo patients, the mean age was 62 years at initial surgery and 71 years at EVAR. All patients were male. Initial open repair was for rupture in five (45%) patients. The average time between initial and subsequent reintervention was 9 years. All patients were ASA Grade III or IV. Fifty-five percent of the PAAs involved the iliac arteries, 36% the abdominal aorta, and 9% were aortoiliac. Ten patients had endovascular stent-grafts inserted electively, and one patient presented with a contained leak. Aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were deployed in seven patients, and bifurcated stent-grafts in four patients. A 100% successful deployment rate was achieved. Perioperative mortality was not seen and one patient needed surgical reintervention to correct an endoleak. Endovascular repair of PAAs is safe and feasible. It is a suitable alternative and has probably now become the treatment of choice in the management of PAAs.
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology 08/2009; 32(6):1165-70. DOI:10.1007/s00270-009-9653-0 · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Myocardial dysfunction is often seen during the inflammatory response to major surgery at 4 to 6h postoperatively. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of glutamine pretreatment, as a means of preconditioning, on lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial dysfunction. C57BL/6 mice were randomized into four groups: Control; lipopolysaccharide; glutamine plus lipopolysaccharide; and Quercetin, an inhibitor of heat shock protein synthesis plus glutamine and lipopolysaccharide. Left ventricular function was assessed at 6h following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) insult by invasive hemodynamics. Heat shock protein (HSP)72 in heart tissue was determined by Western immunoblot at 12h after glutamine administration. Administration of lipopolysaccharide resulted in significant decrease in left ventricular end systolic pressure (LVESP) (69.1 +/- 2.52 mm Hg versus 106.3 +/- 3.36 mm Hg in controls), reduced dP/dtmax (4704.1 +/- 425.31 mm Hg/s versus 9389.8 +/- 999.4 mm Hg/s in controls), and the increase in left ventricular end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) (5.10 +/- 0.28 mm Hg versus 2.16 +/- 0.27 mm Hg in controls) (P < 0.05). Peritoneal injection of 25 g/kg of glutamine 12 h prior to lipopolysaccharide exposure induced HSP72 expression in heart tissues and attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced left ventricular dysfunction: LVESP 85.94 +/- 3.8 mm Hg (P < 0.05), dP/dtmax 8331 +/- 425 mm Hg (P < 0.05), LVEDP 2.32 +/- 0.23 mm Hg (P < 0.01). Quercetin partially attenuated glutamine induced HSP72 expression and blocked the protective response of glutamine. These data demonstrate that cardioprotection with glutamine is associated with induction of HSP72 and may be an approach to activating the preconditioning response in the heart in clinical practise.
    Journal of Surgical Research 06/2009; 160(2):282-7. DOI:10.1016/j.jss.2009.04.033 · 1.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is lack of consensus regarding concurrent vs. staged approaches, and the prioritisation of staged procedures in cases presenting with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) synchronously. We aim to present our experience, review the literature on this therapeutic dilemma and examine the role of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). An observational study of the experience of two centres and a systematic review of the published literature. Twenty-four patients were identified from the prospective databases of two tertiary referral centres between 2001 and 2006. Intervention for both malignancy and aneurysm was performed in 13 patients. In 10 patients, cancer resection was performed initially and was followed by open aneurysm repair (n=3) or EVAR (n=7). Two patients (AAA diameters: 7.0 and 8.0cm) underwent EVAR prior to colonic resection. One patient was selected for synchronous surgery. There were no interval AAA ruptures, graft infection or postoperative mortalities. Literature review identified 269 such cases; of these 101 were treated by combined surgery. In staged surgery, there were nine interval aneurysmal ruptures and one aortic graft infection. In our experience, staged management can be undertaken, without interval aneurysmal rupture. EVAR has an evolving role in preventing delay in CRC management, in high-risk patients, and during combined intervention.
    European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery: the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery 03/2009; 37(5):544-56. DOI:10.1016/j.ejvs.2009.01.004 · 2.49 Impact Factor

  • Diabetes 01/2009; 58(Suppl 1):715-p. · 8.10 Impact Factor

  • Diabetic Medicine 01/2009; 26(Suppl 1):46. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    M Brosnan · C G Collins · D S Moneley · C J Kelly · A.L. Leahy ·
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    ABSTRACT: AAA screening programmes have proven to be beneficial and cost effective worldwide for males greater than 65 years of age, with 4.9% males of 65-75 years of age having an un-diagnosed AAA at screening, resulting in a 42% reduction in the risk of rupture in an English population. This study assessed the incidence of AAA and risk factors for atherosclerosis in Irish males of 55-75 years. From April 2006 to December 2007, males between the ages of 55 and 75 years, living within the catchment area of Blanchardstown Hospital were invited for AAA screening using duplex ultrasound and cardiovascular risk factor screening. 1.9% (17/904) of the study population had previously un-diagnosed aneurysms detected, with sizes ranging from 3.0 cm to 5.8 cm (0.6% in 55-65 years old (yo) and 4.2% in 65-75 yo, p<0.01). 33% (302/904) of patients had hyperlipidaemia, while 16% of those with a previous diagnosis of hyperlipidaemia, were inadequately controlled on the test date. 31% of patients had a single elevated blood pressure reading, meriting further investigation for possible hypertension. 3% (28/904) of all patients had a raised glucose levels which had not previously been identified and of those who had a previous history of DM, 46% had abnormal glucose levels. 16% of patients (93/573) were morbidly obese (BMI>30) and 64% (292/573) were overweight. The incidence of AAAs in 65-75-year-old men is similar to international figures. This study confirms that screening for hyperlipidaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, obesity and hypertension may be worthwhile in all males over 55 years, while AAA screening should be reserved for 65-75-year-old Irish males.
    European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery: the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery 12/2008; 37(3):300-4. DOI:10.1016/j.ejvs.2008.10.005 · 2.49 Impact Factor
  • J S Tsang · P.A. Naughton · S Leong · A.D.K. Hill · C.J. Kelly · A.L. Leahy ·
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    ABSTRACT: Shortened trainingtimes duetothe European Working Time Directive (EWTD) and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. Virtual reality (VR) simulation is a fascinating innovation allowing surgeons to develop without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. A Medline search was performed to identify studies and commentaries on the use of VR simulators in endovascular training. Three studies on carotid stenting and four on peripheral vascular angioplasty demonstrate that simulator training is a valid, feasible and acceptable training tool. One randomised study reports that these skills learned on simulators are transferable to the operating room. VR simulators have a role in competency based, structured training of vascular interventionalists and should improve patient safety.
    The surgeon: journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland 09/2008; 6(4):214-20. DOI:10.1016/S1479-666X(08)80031-5 · 2.18 Impact Factor

  • Irish Journal of Medical Science 02/2008; 177(S1). · 0.83 Impact Factor

  • Irish Journal of Medical Science 01/2008; 177(Supp 14):488. · 0.83 Impact Factor
  • J L O'Donnell · F P Henry · E Kavanagh · P Brennan · E Kay · P Murphy · C J Kelly ·
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    ABSTRACT: We present the case of a 36-year-old female with a three-week history of a pulsatile, tender mass in the anterior triangle of the neck. Radiology demonstrated that this was a vascular tumour deep to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Pre-operative embolisation and complete surgical resection was performed. Histology revealed Castleman's disease. Unicentric hyaline vascular Castleman's disease is an unusual cause of neck mass. Surgical resection remains the best chance for cure in unicentric disease. Long term follow-up is necessary as the risk of subsequent malignancy exists.
    Irish Journal of Medical Science 03/2006; 175(1):79-80. DOI:10.1007/BF03169010 · 0.83 Impact Factor
  • M Joyce · R Casey · C Gang · D Winter · C J Kelly · D J Bouchier-Hayes ·
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate whether inhibition of hydroxymethylglutaryl co-enzyme A reductase attenuates leucocyte-endothelial cell interactions and alters expression of endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) following exposure to endotoxin. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pravastatin + LPS groups (seven per group). Pravastatin sodium was gavaged at 0.4 mg per kg per day for 5 days, after which LPS 15 mg/kg was administered via the jugular vein. Intravital microscopy was used to determine leucocyte-endothelial cell interactions. Following the administration of LPS there was a significant reduction in leucocyte rolling velocity at 10 min (mean(s.e.m.) 69(3) versus 102(6) per cent of baseline value; P = 0.041), an increase in the number of adherent leucocytes at 10 min (4.5(0.5) versus 2.8(0.3) per 100 microm; P = 0.044) and an increase in the number of leucocytes undergoing transendothelial migration at 30 min (4.2(0.4) versus 1.7(0.4) per field; P = 0.008) compared with controls. Pretreatment with pravastatin significantly attenuated LPS-induced leucocyte-endothelial cell interactions (rolling velocity 89(6) per cent at 10 min, P = 0.038; adherent leucocytes 3.0(0.5) per 100 microm at 10 min, P = 0.038; migrating leucocytes 1.9(0.5) per field at 30 min, P = 0.001). This endothelial protection was associated with maintenance of ecNOS and reduced iNOS expression within mesenteric tissues. These data show that pravastatin produces anti-inflammatory effects in response to injurious stimuli by attenuation of leucocyte-endothelial cell interactions.
    British Journal of Surgery 08/2005; 92(8):1034-40. DOI:10.1002/bjs.4985 · 5.54 Impact Factor

  • The surgeon: journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland 07/2005; 3(3):160-3. DOI:10.1016/S1479-666X(05)80036-8 · 2.18 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
239.39 Total Impact Points


  • 1998-2011
    • Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
      • Department of Surgery
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 1992-2011
    • Beaumont Hospital
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Surgery
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2009
    • Imperial College London
      • Section of Biosurgery and Surgical Technology
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1994
    • William Penn University
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
    • The Adelaide and Meath Hospital Ireland
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 1991
    • University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Surgery
      Philadelphia, PA, United States