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Publications (3)10.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: As a result of a 1990 survey by questionnaire, the symptoms of atopy among all 4,952 school children aged 5 to 16 years in the municipal district of Viborg, Denmark, were registered. Random checks, made among children who were recorded as having symptoms, and others who were recorded as having none, accorded well with the information supplied by the parents about symptoms and the clinical diagnosis of a specialist; 10.5% of all school children had rhinitis, 7% had atopic eczema, 3.2% had urticaria and 4.5% had asthma; 1/4 of all those questioned had shown symptoms within the last year, and a further 13% of all the children were reported as having had atopic symptoms that had disappeared more than a year previously. Of the children showing symptoms within the last year before the survey, 2/3 had gone to a doctor. Of the children with present symptoms, largely asthma, 1/4 had been referred to a hospital allergy clinic. For 1/3 of the children with present symptoms, these had led to no contact with a doctor. Of the cases with present symptoms, 6.5% had had contact with natural healers or chiropractors. Rhinitis and asthma were most frequent among boys, while atopic eczema was most frequent among girls. For both sexes, the frequency of rhinitis increased during their years at school, while the frequency of skin symptoms fell.
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 09/1993; 4(3):117-22. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of intolerance to food additives was assessed in a group of unselected school children aged 5-16 years. A study group of 271 children was selected on the basis of the results of a questionnaire on atopic disease answered by 4,274 (86%) school children in the municipality of Viborg, Denmark. The children in the study group followed an elimination diet for two weeks before they were challenged with a mixture of food preservatives, colourings and flavours. The challenge was open and the additives were prepared as a fizzy lemonade. If the open challenge was positive, a double-blind placebo controlled challenge with gelatine capsules was performed. The study included 281 children, 10 were excluded, and the remaining 271 children were given the open challenge (98 healthy controls and 173 with atopic symptoms). The open challenge was negative in all 98 healthy control children who had not reported any atopic symptoms. Of the 173 children reporting present or previous atopic disease 17 had a positive open challenge. Of these 17 children 1 experienced gastrointestinal symptoms, 13 reacted with aggravation of atopic eczema, and 3 with urticaria. Twelve of these 17 children went through the double-blind challenge which was positive in 6 cases. Five of these 6 children had positive reactions to synthetic colourings and 1 to citric acid. No serious reactions were seen. Based upon calculations of the results from this study and an earlier multi-center study in children referred to hospital clinics, the prevalence of intolerance to food additives in school children is estimated to be 1-2%.
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 09/1993; 4(3):123-9. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As a result of a 1990 survey by questionnaire, the symptoms of atopy among all 4, 952 school children aged 5 to 16 years in the municipal district of Viborg, Denmark, were registered. Random eheeks, made among children who were recorded as having symptoms, and others who were recorded as having none, accorded well with the information supplied by the parents about symptoms and the clinical diagnosis of a specialist; 10. 5% of all school children had rhinitis, 7% had atopic eczema, 3. 2% had urticaria and 4. 5% had asthma; ¼ of all those questioned had shown symptoms within the last year, and a further 13% of all the children were reported as having had atopic symptoms that had disappeared more than a year previously. Of the children showing symptoms within the last year before the survey, ⅔ had gone to a doctor. Of the children with present symptoms, largely asthma, ¼ had been referred to a hospital allergy clinic. For ⅓ of the children with present symptoms, these had led to no contact with a doctor. Of the cases with present symptoms, 6. 5% had had contact with natural healers or chiro-practers. Rhinitis and asthma were most freqent among boys, while atopic eczema was most frequent among girls. For both sexes, the frequency of rhinitis increased during their years at school, while the frequency of skin symptoms fell.
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 07/1993; 4(3):117 - 122. · 3.38 Impact Factor